Experimental Courses 2017-2018, G-O

G H I J K L M N O


GDCB 585X. Fundamentals of Predictive Plant Phenomics. (3-3) Cr. 4. F. (Cross-listed with BCB 585X and M E 585X.) Prereqs: Acceptance into the P3 program or instructor permission. Principles of engineering, data analysis, and plant sciences and their interplay applied to predictive plant phenomics. Transport phenomena, sensor design, image analysis, graph models, network data analysis, fundamentals of genomics and phenomics. Multidisciplinary laboratory exercises.

GEOL 103X. Age of Dinosaurs. (1-0) Cr. 1.F.  Introduction to the diversity of dinosaur species. Discussion of basic evolutionary theory and interpreting fossil evidence. Overview of Mesozoic Earth history including paleogeographic and paleoclimate reconstructions. Course available via the World Wide Web.

GEOL 357X. Geological Mapping and Field Methods. (0-3) Cr. 1 S. Prereq: GEOL 100 or GEOL 201; PHYS 111; credit or enrollment in GEOL 356. Generation and interpretation of geological maps via a combination of laboratory and field exercises. Developing skills in 3D thinking, cross-section construction, stereonet analysis, field data collection, and communicating scientific results.

GEOL 468X. Applied Geostatistics for Geoscientists. (Dual-listed with Geol 568X) (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: GEOL 452, C R P 351, C R P 452, NREM 345, or NREM 446. Introduction to geospatial data collection, analysis, interpretation, and presentation. Geospatial techniques including geographic information systems (GIS), remote sensing (RS), and global positioning systems (GPS). Study of applied geostatistical analysis (e.g., interpolation and spatial regression).

GEOL 568X. Applied Geostatistics for Geoscientists. (Dual-listed with Geol 468X) (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: GEOL 452, C R P 351, C R P 452, NREM 345, or NREM 446. Introduction to geospatial data collection, analysis, interpretation, and presentation. Geospatial techniques including geographic information systems (GIS), remote sensing (RS), and global positioning systems (GPS). Study of applied geostatistical analysis (e.g., interpolation and spatial regression).

GERON 589X. Systems Neuroscience: Brain, Behavior, and Nutrition-Related Integrative Physiology. (2-0) Cr. 2. S. (Cross-listed with PSYCH 589X, NEURO 589X, NUTRS 589X, FS HN 589X.) Prereqs: Graduate standing, or undergraduate with consent of instructor. Structural, functional, and biochemical aspects of brain and non-motor behavior across the human lifespan. Types of neuroimaging used to assess the brain. Current research is leveraged to gauge how nutrition, diseases related to nutrition, and associated physiological processes influence the brain, particularly for common developmental, psychological, and neurological disorders.

GLOBE 360X. Global Health. (3-0) Cr. 3. (Cross-listed with MICRO 360X and V MPM 360X.) Prereqs: Biol 211, and either Micro 201 or Micro 302. Global Health explores health and its determinants across the world with a commitment to the many disciplines and variables that influence health. The course will stress the interconnectedness of humans, animals, and the environment, with emphasis on poor countries. The course is designed to challenge the typical understanding of what impacts health and to stimulate the student to take an entrepreneurial approach to finding solutions. Current events will be a major focus of the class. Within the context of health and disease, topics will include poverty, infectious diseases, gender, social media, climate change, animal health, agriculture, and more. Each student will complete one case study on a topic related to global health. Outside reading and films will be required for each class meeting. There will be four exams. Students will also be expected to sign up for Twitter and use Black Board.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement

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HCI 510X. Foundations of Game-based Learning. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with C I 510X). Prereq: 12 graduate credits. Theories, principles and best practices of utilizing games in educational environments. Topics include the theoretical foundations of learning games and game play, identity development in
online environments, and assessment of learning in and out of games.

HD FS 112X. Introduction to Behavioral Observation. (.5-1) Cr. 1 F. Prereq: HD FS 111. Introduction to behavioral observation -- methods and purposes. Practice with specific observational coding instruments.

HD FS 156X. Project OBSERVE Orientation. (2-0) Cr. 1. F. Prereqs: Successful completion of HDFS 110. Introduction to systematic observation and purpose, implementation, and interpretation of observational measures.

HG ED 538X. Foundations of Engineering Education. Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with ENGR 538X.) Prereq: Engineering graduate students or instructor permission required. Introduction to the field of engineering education, with an emphasis on engineering education history, existing challenges, teaching and learning pedagogies and theories, research opportunities, and research methodologies. The course goal is to develop students as scholars and to have students think critically about engineering and education. Students will apply the knowledge gained from this course to propose a research project related to their own discipline. The proposal is intended to help students learn and apply the key elements of engineering education research. This course is intended for students with a variety of interests and career goals, including those interested in learning to conduct engineering education research, exploring research discoveries about teaching and learning, and engaging with the engineering education community.

HIST 255X. Introduction to World History, 1500-Present. (3-0) Cr.3. S. Social and cultural developments; economic and political ideas and institutions; colonization of the Americas; biological exchanges; industrialization; political revolutions; European colonialism; emergence of the Global South; Cold War; decolonization; fossil fuels and energy; global environmental change.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

HIST 271X. The History of Sports in the United States. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Professionalization of sports from their origins as invented recreational activities to their present status as fiscally privileged, legally protected cultural icons. Covering the period from the 17th to the end of the 20th century.

HIST 310X. Africa to 1880. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with AF AM 310X.) Survey of the history of African societies, cultures and civilizations from earliest times to 1880. Evolution of states across the continent; social, economic, political, and cultural developments; nature and consequences of African interactions and relationship with Europeans.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

HIST 387X. First Ladies in U.S. History. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with POL S 387X and W S 387X.)  Evolution of the role and office of the First Lady in U.S. history, including her political activism, social impact, and international influence. Analysis of the authority, intersectionality, and agency of First Ladies in the aggregate and exploration of how individual First Ladies have interpreted and adapted this unique public position.

HIST 449X. US Gilded Age, 1877-1900. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Sophomore classification. U.S. History from the end of Reconstruction to the turn of the twentieth century. Discussion of prominent themes, including the opening of the West, the emergence of big business, rapid urbanization, immigration, race relations, American imperialism, and social reform.

HIST 481X. Public History. (1-2) Cr. 3. F. Repeatable. Prereq: HIST 221 and 222. Development of theories and methods in the field of public history. Emphasis on practical applications such as archival research, museum interpretation, historic preservation, and oral history within the context of United States history.

HORT 291A. Horticulture Professional Development: Turfgrass Competition. (0-2) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Intensive training in preparation for intercollegiate competition in turfgrass, planting, design, plant identification, installation, cost estimating, and other skills at national contests in horticulture. Students must compete in related national competition to earn credit. Graduation restrictions: Only one credit of HORT 291A, 291B, or 291C may count toward Horticulture credits for graduation. A maximum of four credits of any combination of HORT 291A, 291B, and 291C may count toward credits for graduation.

HORT 291C. Horticulture Professional Development: Cross-Commodity. (0-2) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Intensive training in preparation for intercollegiate competition in planting, plant identification and other skills at national contests in horticulture. Students must compete in related national competition to earn credit. Graduation restrictions: Only one credit of HORT 291A, 291B, or 291C may count toward Horticulture credits for graduation. A maximum of four credits of any combination of HORT 291A, 291B, and 291C may count toward credits for graduation.

HORT 476X. Horticultural Postharvest Technology. (3-2) Cr. 3. F. (Dual-listed with HORT 576X.) Prereq: HORT 221. Study of pre- and post-harvest factors, procedures, and challenges that affect market quality of horticultural commodities. Emphasis on storage and handling technologies to preserve quality and extend storage life of edible and ornamental horticultural crops. Field trips outside scheduled class time required.

HORT 576X. Horticultural Postharvest Technology. (3-2) Cr. 3. F. (Dual-listed with HORT 476X.) Prereq: HORT 221. Study of pre- and post-harvest factors, procedures, and challenges that affect market quality of horticultural commodities. Emphasis on storage and handling technologies to preserve quality and extend storage life of edible and ornamental horticultural crops. Field trips outside scheduled class time required.

HSP M 301X. Hospitality Revenue Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. An overview of the revenue management in the lodging and food service industry will be provided. Emphasis will be placed on the application of analytical and forecasting techniques to formulate and implement pricing strategies in responses to daily operation complexities.

HSP M 431X. Case Studies in Event Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Dual-listed with HSP M 531X.) Prereqs: Graduate-level standing and permission by instructor. Operational and strategic challenges in the event management industry through directed case studies, roundtable discussions, and industry-related readings. Students will critically evaluate case studies related to event management in areas of event strategy, financial management, event operations, stakeholder development, event design, marketing, and other event topics.

HSP M 531X. Case Studies in Event Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Dual-listed with HSP M 431X.) Prereqs: Graduate-level standing and permission by instructor. Operational and strategic challenges in the event management industry through directed case studies, roundtable discussions, and industry-related readings. Students will critically evaluate case studies related to event management in areas of event strategy, financial management, event operations, stakeholder development, event design, marketing, and other event topics.

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I E 347X. Medical Manufacturing. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: MAT E 273. Discussion of the role of industrial engineering and manufacturing in the medical field, identification of corresponding industry sectors, overview of commercial biomaterials, 3D modeling, relevant fabrication technologies, and validation of medical devices.

I E 673X. Spine Biomechanics. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: I E 571 or equivalent. Gross and fine anatomy of spine, mechanism of pain, epidemiology, in vitro testing, psychophysical studies, spine stability models, bioinstrumentation: intradiscal pressure, intra-abdominal pressure and electromyography. Biomechanics of lifting and twisting, effects of vibration, effects of posture/lifting style, lifting belts, physical models, optimization models, mathematical models, muscle models, finite element models, current trends in medical management and rehabilitation, chiropractic.

IND D 251X. Activity-Centered Industrial Design. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Admitted to Industrial Design Program and by permission of the instructor. Introduction to design for complex and dynamic situations that include people, products, activities and environments. Emphasizes the relationship between internal and external factors that impact pleasure and performance in these systems. Includes an overview of human diversity and examines the role of the industrial designer in developing the artifacts of daily activity. Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.
Meets U. S. Diversity Requirement.

INFAS 631X. Cyber Security Operations Practicum. (1-6) Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with CPR E 631X). Prereqs: CPR E 532, CPR E 534, and permission of instructor. Practical experience in cyber operations. Cyber security threat analysis, malware analysis, and intrusion detection management. Cyber security data analysis methods. Pen testing tools and techniques. Weekly threat analysis briefings.

INFAS 634X. Current Research Problems in Cyber Security. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: CPR E 530, CPR E 531, permission of instructor. Discussion of national cybersecurity/information systems security problems. Students will learn how to apply research techniques, think clearly about these issues, formulate and analyze potential solutions, and communicate their results. Working in small groups under the mentorship of technical clients from government and industry, each student will formulate, carry out, and present original research on current cybersecurity/information assurance problems of interest to the nation. This course will be run in a synchronized distance fashion, coordinating some activities with our partner schools and our technical clients.

ITAL 107X. Intensive Beginning Italian. (4-0) Cr. 4. F. A communicative approach to grammar and vocabulary within the context of Italian culture for students whose native language is not Italian. Taught in Italian.

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JL MC 240X. Principles of Journalism. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Analysis of journalism industry and specific audiences served by print, electronic, visual and digital media. Introduction to core values of journalism and guiding principles that encompass literacy, ethics, law, history, the economy and cultural and societal implications.

JL MC 414X. Digital Newsroom. (1-4) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: Jl MC 344 or 346 or 347; C+ or better in Jl MC 202 or Jl MC 206.  Fundamentals of digital content creation for use in online news service. Emphasis on reporting, writing and editing skills with additional training in digitizing content. Includes production of photography, slide shows, audio production, video production and blogs.

JL MC 503X. Advanced Communication Research Methods: Quantitative. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: JLMC 502 (or equivalent basic research method course) or permission of the instructor. In-depth examination of quantitative research methods in journalism and mass communication, including surveys, experiments and media content analyses. Data collection, data analysis and presentation of research findings. Application of quantitative research designs to journalism and mass communication cases.

JL MC 504X. Advanced Communication Research Methods: Qualitative. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: JL MC 502 or equivalent research methods course. In-depth examination of qualitative methods in journalism and mass communication research. Social scientific and humanistic modes of inquiry. Discussions of critical-cultural theory, design and presentation of qualitative studies, and application of qualitative research methods in communication.

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KIN 214X. Building Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs. Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Freshman Classification. Repeatable for maximum of 2 credits. Service learning with practical experience in school research focused on promoting physical activity and wellness in youth.

KIN 242X. Planning for Success in a Health Career. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: KIN H major in PHP option with sophomore status or above. Exploration of various health fields to clarify career goals and prepare a parallel career plan outside of medicine. Facilitate preparation of relevant materials for professional and graduate school admission.

KIN 511X. Physical Activity Strategies for Youth. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Physical Activity Strategies for Youth. (3-0). Cr. 3. F. Provide adequate opportunities to develop a more in-depth understanding of (a) the challenges in youth physical activity (PA), (b) the relevant theoretical models that are popular in youth PA, and (c) the strategies that can be implemented to promote PA in youth.

KIN 573X. Impact of Physical Activity on Healthy Aging. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: KIN 355, KIN 358, KIN 366, KIN 372 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Issues of aging from multiple kinesiological perspectives, such as the role of physical activity on brain health, on muscle health, on bone health, and on emotional health. Presentation of research article by students, and discussion; or research articles. Guest professors will present within their area of expertise and lead the discussions. Each student will complete a major writing assignment and verbal presentation in which a review of literature on a related topic will be presented.

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L A 171X. City Play! Active Urban Landscapes. (3-0) Cr. 3. Evolution of play in cities. Introduction to two important concepts: how play has become a central theme in the economic development and sustainability of cities around the world; and, how the design of cities needs to make room for equitable access to play for everyone.

L A 587X. Landscape Structures. (3-1-2) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: LA 583X; graduate standing. Introduction to materials design communication of construction detail of landscape structures. Emphasis on the aesthetic and functional uses of building materials and the sustainable application of wood systems, paving systems, retaining walls, masonry and concrete systems, and metals to landscape projects. Preliminary preparation of construction documents.

LD ST 370X. Special Topics in Leadership Studies. Cr. 1-3. F. Seminar on special topics, research, and theory in Leadership Studies. Students must register for a different topic each time. Not open to first year students.

LING 318X. Introduction to ESL methods and materials. (2-1) Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with ENGL 318X) Prereqs: ENGL/LING 219. Introduction to methods and materials for teaching English as a Second Language (ESL) for elementary and secondary students. Strategies and resources for teaching reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. Elementary Education students must take this course in the same semester as either CI 280S or CI 480S.

LING 320X. Topics in Linguistic Structure. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with ENGL 320X.) Prereqs: ENGL/LING 219, 220.  Special topics related to the study of linguistic structure. Focus on language structure in areas not covered in detail by existing courses. Topics include field linguistics, morphology, forensic linguistics, neurolinguistics, semantics, non-English phonology, acoustic phonetics, linguistic universals, and historical linguistics. Repeatable.

LING 350X. Comparative Linguistics of American Sign Language. (Cross-listed with ASL 350X) (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: ASL 206. Scientific and stylistic language analysis. Phonology, morphology, semantics, syntax, and social-cultural pragmatics of American Sign Language. Comparative prescriptive and descriptive views on ASL and English form and function.

LING 410X. Language as Data.  (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Junior standing. Methods of discovering language patterns in text documents solve practical text analysis problems in the disciplines. Fundamentals of linguistics and its role in text analysis. Practice writing R scripts to perform text analysis and visualize textual data.

LING 492X. Fieldwork in Communication Disorders. Cr. 1-2. F. (Cross-listed with CMDIS 492X.) Prereqs: CMDIS/LING 371;471; completion or concurrent enrollment in CMDIS/LING 480A or 480B or 480C. Guided observation of clinical evaluation and treatment in Communication Disorders on campus and in the community. Assessed service learning component.

LING 517X. Corpus Linguistics. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with  ENGL 517X) Prereq: ENGL 511 or LING 511 or an introductory course in Linguistics. Corpus linguistics methods of language analysis, including corpus design, construction and annotation; data in corpus studies; tools and methods of analysis. Corpus methods applied in vocabulary, grammar, register and dialect variation, language change, pragmatics, semantics, stylistics, language learning and teaching, and language testing.

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M E 318X. Solar Powered Racing Vehicles - Design, Construction and Racing. (1-2) Cr. 3 F. (Cross-listed with CPR E 318X/E E 318X/MAT E 318X.) Prereq: Permission of instructor and department. Project-based course centered on the design, construction and racing of a solar powered vehicle; focus will be around hands on design and manufacturing of solar car with support from leading companies and collaborators, accompanied by a series of focus-based classes, workshops and networking events optimized to enhance the student's learning experience and employability.

M E 401X. Human Centered Design, Pre-Departure Course. (1-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Acceptance into Study Abroad Program. A pre-departure course for M E 402X. Safety and health issues while on site; travel logistics; required travel documents and deadlines; cultural norms.

M E 416X. Mechanism Design and Analysis. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: M E 325. An introduction to the design and analysis of mechanisms and the use of prescribed design methodologies to identify design requirements and achieve desired motion profiles. Topics include fundamental mechanism kinematics; graphical and analytical mechanism synthesis methods; velocity and acceleration analysis; and the design of linkages, cams and gear trains. Significant amount of team-based problem solving and the development of physical and computational models to assist in the design process.

M E 427X. Vehicle Dynamics and Suspension Design. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: MATH 265, MATH 267, and E M 345. Analysis and evaluation of the performance of cars, trucks and other surface vehicles. Computer simulation of ride, braking, and directional response. Considerations in the design and fabrication of suspension systems.

M E 502X. Microfluidics and Nanofluidics: Theory, Design and Devices. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: M E 436 (Heat Transfer) or an undergraduate class on transport phenomena, or Instructor’s permission. Analysis of fluid motion in the field of microfluidics, i.e., the dynamics of fluid flow at the sub-millimeter scale under the influence of relevant physical forces. Contemporary microfluidics is relevant to the scientific study of flows in small geometries, to the design of tools for biology, medicine and energy technologies. Constitutive relations for the stress tensor in a fluid; Conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy. Capillary and multiphase flow at small scales. Wettability and related surface engineering methods. Interfacial transport phenomena involving thermal, chemical or electrical gradients. Analytical and numerical methods to design microfluidic devices such as pumps, valves, heat exchangers, actuators, dispensers and mixers. Analysis of applications of multiphase microfluidics in engineering and biological structures.

M E 550X. Advanced Biosensors:Fundamentals and Applications. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: Graduate status. Recommend a basic background in engineering and one or more introductory biology courses. 3 credits (Spring, 2016) Extensive overview of biosensors including biological/biomedical microelectromechanical (Bio-MEMs) systems and bioanalytical devices with an introduction to fundamental principles, detection methods, and miniaturization techniques. Fundamental biosensor theory including biorecognition, transduction, signal acquisition, and post processing/data analysis will be discussed. Distinct sensing modalities (e.g., electrochemical, optical, thermal and mass based), biorecognition agents (e.g., enzymes, antibodies, aptamers, whole cells/tissues, genetically engineered proteins) and advanced transduction materials (e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene, quantum/carbon dots, and polymers/hydrogels) and their use in the context of specific applications (e.g., biomedical, environmental, food safety) will be reviewed in detail. Additionally, students will design a theoretical biosensor and present their design in a written proposal and oral presentation.

M E 585X. Fundamentals of Predictive Plant Phenomics. (3-3) Cr. 4. F. (Cross-listed with BCB 585X and GDCB 585X.) Prereqs: Acceptance into the P3 program or instructor permission. Principles of engineering, data analysis, and plant sciences and their interplay applied to predictive plant phenomics. Transport phenomena, sensor design, image analysis, graph models, network data analysis, fundamentals of genomics and phenomics. Multidisciplinary laboratory exercises.

MAT E 318X. Solar Powered Racing Vehicles - Design, Construction and Racing. (1-2) Cr. 3 F. (Cross-listed with CPR E 318X/E E 318X/M E 318X.) Prereq: Permission of instructor and department. Project-based course centered on the design, construction and racing of a solar powered vehicle; focus will be around hands on design and manufacturing of solar car with support from leading companies and collaborators, accompanied by a series of focus-based classes, workshops and networking events optimized to enhance the student's learning experience and employability.

MAT E 319X. Mechanics of Structures and Materials. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: PHYS 221, credit or enrollment in MATH 166. Fundamentals of engineering mechanics as applied to materials. Forces and moments; stresses in loaded bodies; elasticity and stress analysis including stress / strain relationships; failure of materials including the mechanics of creep, fracture, and fatigue. Only one of Mat E 319X or (EM 274 + EM 324) may be used for graduation requirements.

MAT E 395X. Theory and Applications of Frugal Engineering. Arr.Cr. S. The goal of the class is to introduce students to Frugal Innovation, in which low-cost practical engineering solutions are sought for specific products to be used in the developing world. Technical instruction will include engineering principles necessary for working in the constrained environment of a village with minimal infrastructure, limited to no construction materials. Design conception, feasibility, production, and implementation are emphasized within the context of local cultures and needs.

MATH 240X. Mathematics of Investment and Credit. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Math 166. Interest rates, time value of money, annuities. Loans, bonds, yield rates. Term structure of interest rates, asset and liability management. Duration, convexity, immunization.

MATH 441X. Life Contingencies I. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: MATH 240X, STAT 341. Present value determination of random variables associated with benefits and expenses for life insurance and annuities, premium calculation methodologies, parametric survival models, single life state, benefit premiums, and reserves.

MATH 619X. Commutative Algebra. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. prereq: MATH 505. Detailed study of commutative rings with applications to number theory and algebraic geometry, including prime ideals, Going Up and Going Down theorems, exact sequences, modules of fractions, primary decomposition, rings of integers, dimension theory.

MATH 620X. Lie Algebras and Their Representations. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: MATH 504; and MATH 507 or MATH 510. Nilpotent and solvable Lie algebras. Root systems and the classification of finite-dimensional complex semi-simple Lie algebras. The universal enveloping algebra. Representation theory including Weyl's theorem, Verma modules, highest weight theory.

MATH 667X. Computational Methods for Hyperbolic Partial Differential Equations. (3-0) Cr. 3. F., offered odd-numbered years. Prereqs: MATH 561, MATH 562. Mathematical theory of weak/entropy solutions of nonlinear hyperbolic conservation laws; shock speed and Riemann problems; numerical methods for scalar equations and systems including Euler equations; conservative methods; approximate Riemann solvers; total variation stability; DG method.

MICRO 115X. Phage Discovery Lab. (1-3) Cr. 2. F. An exploratory laboratory where students will purify phage from soil, visualize phage using electron microscopy and isolate genomic material for nucleic acid sequencing.

MICRO 360X. Global Health. (3-0) Cr. 3. (Cross-listed with GLOBE 360X and V MPM 360X.) Prereqs: Biol 211, and either Micro 201 or Micro 302. Global Health explores health and its determinants across the world with a commitment to the many disciplines and variables that influence health. The course will stress the interconnectedness of humans, animals, and the environment, with emphasis on poor countries. The course is designed to challenge the typical understanding of what impacts health and to stimulate the student to take an entrepreneurial approach to finding solutions. Current events will be a major focus of the class. Within the context of health and disease, topics will include poverty, infectious diseases, gender, social media, climate change, animal health, agriculture, and more. Each student will complete one case study on a topic related to global health. Outside reading and films will be required for each class meeting. There will be four exams. Students will also be expected to sign up for Twitter and use Black Board.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement

MICRO 517X. Gut Microbiome: Implications for Health and Diseases. (3-0) Cr.3. F. (Cross-listed with AN S 517X, FS HN 517X, and V MPM 517X.) Prereq: Basic Knowledge in microbiology. Explore current research on gut microbiome including modern tools used to study the gut microbiome. Examine the linkages between gut microbiome and health status, diseases, and manipulation of gut microbiome to improve health.

MIS 315X. Business Data Streams and Issues. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with ACCT 315X.) Prereq: COM S 113. Identification of open data sources and other private data sources. Develop methods of data access, collection, and sharing; develop methods to validate and standardize data sources; develop methods to assess data worthiness (risk).

MIS 515X. Business Data. (3-0) Cr.3. F. Understanding the issues and challenges of data from multiple sources, different velocities, in large volumes with questionable veracity.

MIS 548X. Applications of Machine Learning for Business Intelligence. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Introduction to applications for data science concepts in the business domain. As big data, machine learning, business analytics, business intelligence and other concepts grow in business applications, it is essential for students to understand the underlying concepts, data, models, and applications to be successful in a data-driven world. Students will learn how to determine problem types, data restrictions, model selection, tool choice, and analysis of data science concepts for greater business value.

MIS 556X . Business Analytics Capstone Project. Cr. 3 S. Prereqs: MIS 547 or departmental permissions. Synthesize analytics concepts, skills, and practices learned during the program of study to complete a course project. Projects proposals relevant to a firm are proposed and accepted midway through the program. Student cohort teams will complete the capstone project under the supervision of an advisory team of faculty. At the completion of the course teams will present their project marking the completion of the program of study.

MIS 568X. Marketing Analytics. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with MKT 568X.) Integration of various concepts to solve problems using appropriate tools. Specifically, the course consist of the following three components: (a) help students develop consultative problem-solving skills; (b) introduce various newly developed consumer behavior theories; (c) provide an overview of quantitative models in the field of marketing analytics. Hands-on experiences to enhance skills such as formulating problems, structuring and prioritizing problems, synthesizing results and communicating intuition from complicated analyses.

MGMT 320X. Corporate Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Technology Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: MGMT 310. Entrepreneurial approaches aimed at the identification, development and exploitation of technical and organizational innovations, the management of new product or process developments, and the effective management of new venture in the context of mid-size to large corporations in manufacturing as well as in service industries. Development of an awareness and understanding of the range, scope, and complexity of issues related to the creation of a corporate environment that is supportive of entrepreneurial endeavors as well as to gain insights concerning the effective implementation of technological and organizational innovations in corporate settings.

MGMT 605X. Seminar in Strategic Management and Entrepreneurship . Cr. 3. F. Critical review of theory and research in the field of strategic management and entrepreneurship. Introduction to representative conceptual and empirical research. Review theories that provide the foundation for management research, and review current research in associate research streams. The review will cover fundamental questions in strategy. Ideas on how to teach management topics will also be introduced.

MGMT 607X. Current Topics in Entrepreneurship Research. (2-1) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Enrollment in the doctoral program. This course covers current theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches in entrepreneurship research. Current entrepreneurship research is inherently interdisciplinary such that we will draw on insights from scholars across a range of disciplines.

MGMT 608X. Human Resources Management Theory & Research. Cr. 3. S. Advanced research seminar in human resources management. The scope and coverage of the seminar is designed to representatively reflect the important content areas in the field, and the major theoretical and empirical contributions in each area. The seminar will be decidedly research focused with discussions concentrating on critical reviews and evaluations of existing work, and the identification of potential directions for theory development and future research. Through reading assignments, weekly papers, and the development of a theoretical paper, students should gain an appreciation for the current status of theory and research, and begin to articulate major issues and challenges facing the field of human resources management.

MKT 342X. Foundation of Personal Selling. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: MKT 340. The process of selling and how to sell effectively. Focus on selling in a business environment and applying to concepts to general interpersonal settings in personal life. Students will actively participate in class, collaborate with teammates to develop skills to sell ideas and become more effective in representing themselves and their company and its products and services. Develop skills necessary to build long-term, profitable relationships with clients.

MKT 361X. Social Media Marketing Strategy. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: MKT 340. The course will cover marketing, advertising and communications strategies in the new media landscape where traditional media (e.g., television, print) and the online social media (i.e., Web 2.0; e.g., online social networks, user-generated content, blogs, forums) co-exist. Students will be expected to have knowledge about the fundamentals of traditional advertising methods and strategies. With this background knowledge, the primary focus of this course will be on understanding social media, how to build social media marketing strategies, and how to track their effectiveness. This course will not look at more tactical aspects of advertising/communications such as creative, message management, and publicity. This will first and foremost be a marketing strategy course.

MKT 568X. Marketing Analytics. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with MIS 568X.) Integration of various concepts to solve problems using appropriate tools. Specifically, the course consist of the following three components: (a) help students develop consultative problem-solving skills; (b) introduce various newly developed consumer behavior theories; (c) provide an overview of quantitative models in the field of marketing analytics. Hands-on experiences to enhance skills such as formulating problems, structuring and prioritizing problems, synthesizing results and communicating intuition from complicated analyses.

MKT 606X. Seminar in Consumer Behavior II. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: MKT 601. A rigorous foundation of the major conceptual and methodological paradigms in the consumer-behavior literature. Seeks to further develop and study issues contained in MKT 601.

M S E 437X. Electronic Properties of Materials. (3-0) Cr. 3 S. (Cross-listed with M S E 537X) (Dual-listed with E E 437X) Prereq: E E 332 or MAT E 317 or PHYS 322. Review of classical and quantum mechanical descriptions of electrons in solids, band theory, metallic conduction, lattice vibrations, semiconductors, semiconductor devices, dielectrics, polarization, dielectric relaxation, crystal anisotropy, ferroelectricity, piezoelectricity, superconductivity, magnetism, device applications.

M S E 537X. Electronic Properties of Materials. (3-0) Cr. 3 S. (Cross-listed with M S E 437X) (Dual-listed with E E 537X) Prereq: E E 332 or MAT E 317 or PHYS 322. Review of classical and quantum mechanical descriptions of electrons in solids, band theory, metallic conduction, lattice vibrations, semiconductors, semiconductor devices, dielectrics, polarization, dielectric relaxation, crystal anisotropy, ferroelectricity, piezoelectricity, superconductivity, magnetism, device applications.

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NEURO 589X. Systems Neuroscience: Brain, Behavior, and Nutrition-Related Integrative Physiology. (2-0) Cr. 2. S. (Cross-listed with PSYCH 589X, NUTRS 589X, FS HN 589X, GERON 589X.) Prereqs: Graduate standing, or undergraduate with consent of instructor. Structural, functional, and biochemical aspects of brain and non-motor behavior across the human lifespan. Types of neuroimaging used to assess the brain. Current research is leveraged to gauge how nutrition, diseases related to nutrition, and associated physiological processes influence the brain, particularly for common developmental, psychological, and neurological disorders.

NREM 240X. Quantitative Problem Solving in Natural Resources. (2-2) Cr. 3 S. Prereqs: STAT 101 or STAT 104, or permission from the instructor. Applied quantitative problem-solving skills for natural resource management. Focus on group and individual exercises, with practical problems in geography, hydrology, forestry and ecology. Laboratory includes field data collection and computer data processing and modeling.

NREM 485X. Undergraduate Seminar. (1-0) Cr. 1 F. S. Prereqs: Junior or Senior classification in Animal Ecology or Forestry majors (instructor may grant permission for students in other majors to register for course). Weekly seminars on current research topics in natural resource ecology and management. Style and best practice in oral research communication. Skills and principles for evaluating research merit and quality of technical communication.

NUTRS 589X. Systems Neuroscience: Brain, Behavior, and Nutrition-Related Integrative Physiology. (2-0) Cr. 2. S. (Cross-listed with PSYCH 589X, NEURO 589X, FS HN 589X, GERON 589X.) Prereqs: Graduate standing, or undergraduate with consent of instructor. Structural, functional, and biochemical aspects of brain and non-motor behavior across the human lifespan. Types of neuroimaging used to assess the brain. Current research is leveraged to gauge how nutrition, diseases related to nutrition, and associated physiological processes influence the brain, particularly for common developmental, psychological, and neurological disorders.