Experimental Courses 2021-2022, A-F

A B C D E F

A

A B E 327L. Animal Production Systems Design Lab. (0-2) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in TSM 327. Engineering analysis of Livestock and Poultry production systems as related to applications of Precision Livestock Farming Technology (PLFT), economic and environmental management, and manure and nutrient management. Focus on the design of animal production systems based on ASABE/NRCS Standards and Local Codes. Concrete and earthen manure storages and open-lot runoff management structures; utilization of RUSLE-2 and P-index in the development of comprehensive nutrient management plans; making economic and environmental management decisionsrelated to improving production, gaseous emissions reporting, and odor mitigation.

A B E 375X. Introduction to Global Engineering. (Cross-listed with ENGR 375X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Junior classification in engineering, or instructor permission. Focus will be on preparing future engineers to be change-makers, peacemakers, social entrepreneurs, and facilitators of sustainable human development, and equip them with the tools, knowledge, global perspective, and entrepreneurial mindset required to solve the world’s most pressing issues. Understanding the role that engineers play in sustainable human development, global engineering, and international development. Faculty and guest speakers with first-hand experience and subject matter expertise will provide real-world insights and a practical framework for conducting small-scale engineering projects in low income countries through a combination of community development practices, appropriate technologies, and engineering project management.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

A B E 516X. Data Science and Analytics for Agricultural and Biosystem Engineers. (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Credit in A B E 160 or equivalent.  Introduction to research methods associated with data science concepts and their applications. Analyses and research related to agricultural and biosystems engineering and technology; methods to develop and maintain reproducible data analysis pipelines; best practices of data visualization and communication of data-driven results to broad audiences; concepts of data integrity and ethics.

A B E 585X. Biosystems for Sustainable Development. (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Understanding and appreciation of sustainable development issues related to food, water, energy, and climate change nexus and its implications for environmental sustainability, nutrition security, one health, and economic development of communities in the US and other countries. Application of basic agricultural, biological, math, and engineering/applied sciences to solve society’s problems for water, food, energy, and environment systems. Emphasis placed on learning from case studies and developing sustainable solutions for communities. Students will learn to lead by example, improve their leadership and communication skills to understand local conditions and motivate themselves and others to improve the world around us.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

A ECL 375X. Marine Ecology and Ecosystems Dynamics. (Cross-listed with BIOL 375X and ENSCI 375X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: BIOL 211 and completion or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 212. Overview of the ecological processes, ecosystems, and biodiversity in marine environments. Ever-changing dynamics caused by environmental disturbances, internal forces, or by human impacts on species and ecosystems.

A ECL 444X. Aquatic Toxicology. (Dual-listed with A ECL 544X and TOX 544X; cross-listed with TOX 444X). (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereqs: Graduate student status, or undergraduate status having declared a minor in Pharmacology and Toxicology, or having completed BIOL 211 and BIOL 212. An overview of interactions between anthropogenic chemicals and aquatic ecosystems. Topics include history of aquatic toxicology, methods of toxicity testing, and species responses to toxicants. Emphasis is on aquatic pollutants of emerging concern (e.g., nanoparticles, microplastics).

A ECL 544X. Aquatic Toxicology. (Dual-listed with A ECL 444X and TOX 444X; cross-listed with TOX 544X). (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereqs: Graduate student status, or undergraduate status having declared a minor in Pharmacology and Toxicology, or having completed BIOL 211 and BIOL 212. An overview of interactions between anthropogenic chemicals and aquatic ecosystems. Topics include history of aquatic toxicology, methods of toxicity testing, and species responses to toxicants. Emphasis is on aquatic pollutants of emerging concern (e.g., nanoparticles, microplastics).

A M D 288X. Styling. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: A M D 131, A M D 275. Focus on the many facets of the styling profession, including commercial styling, editorial (magazine) styling, personal style consultation, and red-carpet styling. Study of the practical requirements of the profession and the importance of an appropriate digital presence. Course will utilize a hands-on approach with lectures and projects.

A M D 355X. Textile History: Global Perspectives of Textiles. (3-0). Cr. 3. S.SS Prereq: 3 credits HIST or ART H; A M D 204 recommended. Survey of world textile history from prehistory to the present. Emphasis on how social, cultural, artistic, technological, and economic contexts have affected the development of world textiles and on the interrelationships among their designs, techniques, symbolism, and meanings. Heightened attention to issues of power, privilege, and equity. Hands-on experience with textile making.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

A M D 366X. History of Menswear. (3-0) Cr. 3. Focus on the important changes in European and American menswear from the Renaissance to the present. Discussion of changing silhouettes and styles, and special topics in menswear such as the codification of the suit, dandyism, and subcultural styles. A strong emphasis will be placed on how men’s dress is connected to the social, cultural, political, economic, environmental, and technological contexts of the Western world.

A M D 388X. Trend Forecasting. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: A M D 204, A M D 245, A M D, 275, 3 credits from ACCT 284, MATH 104, MATH 105, MATH 140, MATH 150, or equivalent. Explore many facets of fashion forecasting, including trend research, managing inspiration sources and trend ideas, product adoption, degrees of difference, and turning a fashion forecast into a buying plan. Applications of fashion forecasting will be examined, who does it and how it fits into various careers. The course will utilize a hands-on approach with lecture, discussion, and projects.

A M D 509X. Clothing Comfort: Theory and Practice . (3-0) Cr. 3. F. The background knowledge and relevant theories on clothing comfort issues, specifically the functional garment and protective clothing, will be introduced. The heat stress/heat strain associated with wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) will be explored and studied. Several cases on sportswear, firefighter gear, military personnel, mining workers, medical practitioners and law enforcement will be analyzed. The current standard related to clothing comfort testing and evaluation from textile material to garment will be reviewed. The performance evaluation through textile material and clothing testing and analysis will be practiced through a course research project.

ACCT 461X. Entrepreneurship and Accounting Information . (Cross-listed with ENTSP 461X). (Dual listed with ACCT 561X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: ACCT 284. Accounting information recording, dissemination, and use by entrepreneurs. Introduces pro forma financials, venture capital, private equity, and state and federal regulations for business creation and formation. Other topics include intrapreneurship, intellectual property, information privacy, cybersecurity, and internal controls, including managing the risk of embezzlement.

ACCT 561X. Entrepreneurship and Accounting Information . (Dual-listed with 461X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: ACCT 284. Accounting information recording, dissemination, and use by entrepreneurs. Introduces pro forma financials, venture capital, privateequity, and state and federal regulations for business creation and formation. Other topics include intrapreneurship, intellectual property,information privacy, cybersecurity, and internal controls, including managing the risk of embezzlement.

ACCT 580A. CPA Exam Preparation - AUD. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: Master of Accounting student. Preparation for the Auditing and Attestation (AUD) section of the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) examination. Only two of ACCT 580A, 580B, 580C, 580D, 580E, and 580F may count toward graduation. Offered satisfactory-fail only.

ACCT 580B. CPA Exam Preparation - BEC. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: Master of Accounting student. Preparation for the Business Environment and Concepts (BEC) section of the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) examination. Only two of ACCT 580A, 580B, 580C, 580D, 580E, and 580F may count toward graduation. Offered satisfactory-fail only.

ACCT 580C. CPA Exam Preparation - FAR. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: Master of Accounting student. Preparation for the Financial Accounting and Reporting (FAR) section of the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) examination. Only two of ACCT 580A, 580B, 580C, 580D, 580E, and 580F may count toward graduation. Offered satisfactory-fail only.

ACCT 580D. CPA Exam Preparation - REG. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: Master of Accounting student. Preparation for the Regulation (REG) section of the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) examination. Only two of ACCT 580A, 580B, 580C, 580D, 580E, and 580F may count toward graduation. Offered satisfactory-fail only.

ACCT 580E. CMA Exam Preparation - Part 1. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: Master of Accounting student. Preparation for Part 1 (Financial Planning, Performance, and Analytics) of the Certified Management Accountant (CMA) examination. Only two of ACCT 580A, 580B, 580C, 580D, 580E, and 580F may count toward graduation. Offered satisfactory-fail only.

ACCT 580F. CMA Exam Preparation - Part 2. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: Master of Accounting student. Preparation for Part 2 (Strategic Financial Management) of the Certified Management Accountant (CMA) examination. Only two of ACCT 580A, 580B, 580C, 580D, 580E, and 580F may count toward graduation. Offered satisfactory-fail only.

ACSCI 391X.  Actuarial Exam P Lab. (1-0) Cr. 1. F.S.SS. Prereq: STAT 326. Material review for actuarial exam P.

ACSCI 392X.  Actuarial Exam FM Lab. (1-0) Cr. 1. F.S.SS. Prereq: MATH 240. Material review for actuarial exam FM.

AER E 364X. Cyber-Physical Systems Application. (Cross-listed with CPS 364X). (2-2) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: ENGR 160 or equivalent course; credit or enrollment in MATH 267; knowledge of Python. Fundamental principles of cyber-physical systems and their system-level applications at an introductory level; introduction to radio control systems and control of actuators; computer programming of physical systems; data processing and communication; control loops; X-by-wire control systems; simulation; testing of control loops.

AER E 365X. Avionics and Controls Laboratory. (1-2) Cr. 2. F. Pre-reqs: AER E 160, AER E 161, enrollment or credit in MATH 267. Fundamental principles of digital avionics; radio control systems and pulse-width-modulation control of servos and motors; programming embedded systems; data communication; PID control loops; fly-by-wire control systems; simulation; bench/flight testing of control loops.

AER E 515X. Atomistic and Multiscale Mechanics of Materials. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: E M 510; E M 516; AER E 525. Introduction to atomistic and multiscale computational methodology for the graduate-level study of mechanics of materials. At the end of this course, students will have an awareness and understanding of the application of atomistic and multiscale materials modeling techniques to fracture, plasticity, phase transformation, corrosion, thermal and mass transport in a variety of engineering materials.

AER E 651X. Space Trajectory Optimization. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: AER E 451, AER E 551. Classical methods and recent advances in space trajectory optimization. Primer vector theory, introduction to direct and indirect methods for trajectory optimization, the problem of multi gravity assist with deep space maneuvers (MGADSM), optimization of the MGADSM using evolutionary algorithms, hidden genes genetic algorithms for trajectory optimization, and shape-based methods for trajectory design.

AESHM 111X. Professional Development for AESHM . (1-0) Cr. 1. F.S. Prereq: Concurrent with AESHM 112 . Introduction to: Career Services, resumes and portfolios, presentation skills, intrapersonal skills with a wellness focus, interpersonal skills including leadership, business etiquette, and professional ethics.

AESHM 345X. Retail/Hospitality Experiences & Events. Cr. 1-3. Survey course of retail and hospitality events. Production and execution of retail and hospitality events in the Student Innovation Center.

AESHM 462X. Black Lives Matter: Fashion, Politics, and Resistance Movements. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S. (Offered 2022). Prereq: A M D 165 or permission of instructor.  Use historical and cultural methods to examine the history of the Black Lives Matter movement its relationship to past resistance/activist movements and fashion and appearance. Summarize and evaluate literature on Black activism and Black identity. Plan and develop a public exhibition and opening event.

AESHM 501X. Introduction to Scholarly Research for Graduate Students. Cr. 1. F.S.SS. Focus on the basics of developing scholarly research, including definition and purpose of research and the components of research reporting. Emphasis on standards for each section of research reports. Tips for research reporting and processes of research development. An introduction to ethical standards. Required of all new AESHM graduate students.
Satisfactory-Fail.

AESHM 579X. Data Analytics for Apparel, Event, and Hospitality Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. SS. Prereq: STAT 587 or equivalent (AESHM 510, HD FS 503). Business analytics is a process of transforming data into meaningful insights and actionable results in the context of decision making and problem solving. Review of the data-related challenges apparel, event, and hospitality organizations confront and the importance of data analytics in making critical management decisions. Basic analytic techniques including data management, analysis, interpretation, and visualization and analyze case studies that successfully deployed these techniques.

AF AM 469X. History of Racial Violence in Europe and the United States, 1865-1945. (Cross-listed with HIST 469X). (3-0). Cr. 3. Irr. S. History of racial and genocidal violence comparing the experiences of Black, Latino/a/x, Native, and Asian peoples in the United States with Jewish people, the Romani, and people of African descent in Europe. The class focuses on the forms of individual and state-sponsored violence, culminating in the Holocaust. Field trip to Washington, D.C.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

AFAS 483X. Situational Leadership Laboratory with Physical Training . (0-2) Cr. 2. Repeatable. F.S. Prereq: AFAS 403. Situational leadership laboratory is for extended cadets that have completed the AFROTC curriculum but have not finished their degree. This provides an opportunity to continue growing as a leader in supervisory and mentorship positions while assisting the cadre with planning and controlling of all upper-level AFROTC military activities. Extended cadets will have the opportunity to work directly with cadre on special projects and duties that further prepare them for life as an active duty officer. Full participation in all events will be determined based on student's physical and medical eligibility.

AGEDS 323X. Strategic Communication in Agriculture and the Environment. (Cross-listed with P R 323X). Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: ENGL 250; junior classification. Effective communication of agricultural and environmental issues. Analysis of attitudes, advocacy, stakeholder engagement, and impacts on individual and societal choices. Application in the domains of public relations, mass media, and popular culture.

AGEDS 425X. Curriculum for Agricultural Science Education. (Dual-listed with AGEDS 525X). Cr. 1-6. Repeatable. SS. Inquiry-based techniques for education related to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in agriculture in secondary classrooms. Analyze, demonstrate, and design activities, labs, and projects using inquiry-based frameworks for teaching and learning.  

AGEDS 525X. Curriculum for Agricultural Science Education. (Dual-listed with AGEDS 425X). Cr. 1-6. Repeatable. SS. Inquiry-based techniques for education related to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in agriculture in secondary classrooms. Analyze, demonstrate, and design activities, labs, and projects using inquiry-based frameworks for teaching and learning.

AGEDS 568X. Qualitative Interviews and Analysis. (3-0) Cr. 3F. Prereq: Graduate status. Understanding the role of interviews in agricultural education research, basis for theory of meaning, and variations of interview technique among qualitative traditions. Development of facilitation technique for individual interviews; and focus groups. Transcription and basic qualitative analysis. Use of interview findings to prepare manuscripts.

AGEDS 580X. A Survey of Leadership Theories. (3-0) Cr. 3F.  Examine postulates, applications and limitations of various leadership theories such as Transformational Leadership, Authentic Leadership, Servant Leadership, and Adaptive Leadership. Valuable to individuals interested in pursuing leadership opportunities in academia and business; and specifically Agricultural Education, Communication and Extension Education.

AGRON 240X. Hemp: Potential and Constraints for a New Crop. (Cross-listed with ENT 240X). (2-0). Cr. 2. History, biology, and agronomy of hemp as it is allowed to be grown in Iowa.

AGRON 425X. Crop and Soil Modeling. (Dual-listed with 525). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MATH 165 or equivalent; AGRON 316 or AGRON 354 or equivalent. Understanding basic crop physiology and soil processes through the use of mathematical and statistical approaches. Structure of crop models, dynamics and relationship among components such as leaf-level photosynthesis, canopy architecture, root dynamics and soil carbon and nitrogen pools.

AGRON 537X. Quantitative Analytics for Plant Breeding. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: AGRON 181, MATH 140. Methods to quantify consequences of decisions based on analytical methods used in crop genetic improvement and cultivar development.

AGRON 693X. Entrepreneurship for Graduate Students in Science and Engineering. (Cross-listed with BCB 693X, E E 693X, ENGR 693X, GENET 693X, and M E 693X). (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.  Prereq: Graduate student status and completion of at least one semester of graduate coursework. Understanding key topics of starting a technology based company, from development of technology-led idea to early-stage entrepreneurial business. Concepts discussed include: entrepreneurship basics, starting a business, funding your business, protecting your technology/business IP.Subject matter experts and successful, technology-based entrepreneurs will provide real world examples from their experience with entrepreneurship. Learn about the world class entrepreneurship ecosystem at ISU and Central Iowa. Satisfactory-fail only.

AM IN 327X. Native American Agriculture. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: AM IN 210. Indigenous agriculture in North America. Topics include pre-contact agriculture in North America, cultural perspectives on agriculture, the changes caused by contact with Europeans, and the state of contemporary Native agriculture in a global market. Themes may include Native solutions to challenges of hunger and inadequate nutrition, food sovereignty, seed saving, and food deserts.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

AN S 219X. Survey of Animal Nutrition . (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: BIOL 101, BIOL 212 or equivalent and CHEM 163, 167, 177 or 201 . Nutrients, simple digestion and absorption, feed management strategies, nutrient requirements, ration formulation for livestock and companion animals.

AN S 316X. Equine Reproduction Lab.  Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in AN S 331, AN S 116 or instructor permission. Reproductive anatomy with emphasis on the physiology of normal reproductive function; breeding season management; ways to control and improve reproduction; semen collection, evaluation, and processing; artificial insemination; pregnancy testing; parturition in the mare, foal care. Participation outside of class time is expected.

AN S 351X. Principles of Domestic Animal Genetics. (Cross-listed with GEN 351X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: BIOL 211, BIOL 212, and STAT 101 or 104.  Foundation of genetics, genomics, and statistical concepts in domestic animal populations.

ANTHR 310X. Environmental Anthropology. (3-0). Cr. 3. Prereq: ANTHR 201. Exploration of contemporary theories and methods in environmental anthropology with a focus on anthropological approaches to the global climate crisis.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement. 

ANTHR 335X. Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereqs: ANTHR 201 or ANTHR 306 recommended. Anthropological approaches to the study of Middle East cultures. Survey of major culture areas, discussion of economic, political, and social and religious issues and systems. Examination of contemporary social movements.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

ANTHR 599X. Creative Component. Cr.1-5. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Prereqs: Graduate classification, permission of major professor. Individually directed study applying anthropological methods and theory to a practical research problem; for students electing the nonthesis degree option.

ARCH 518X. Balkans to Baltics: Modern Architecture in Europe's Middle. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Graduate or Senior classification. History and theory of modern architecture in Eastern Europe from the late 19th century through the end of the 20th century. Analytic term paper and weekly readings with in-class discussions. Credits count toward fulfillment of History Theory Culture requirement
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

ARCH 536X. Advanced Design Media.  (Dual-listed with AGEDS 436). Cr. 3. Repeatable. Prereq: Graduate Classification and ARCH 601 or equivalent skills. Special topics in design media applications.

ARTGR 383X . A Concise History of Graphics and Sports. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. This introduction to basic concepts of branding in design explores the processes of sports, graphics of sports, design criteria of sport objects, consumer trends, and social importance of sports will be discussed. This course takes a historical perspective of sport graphics and objects starting at the first known understanding of what could be considered “Sport,” from ancient times to the present. Interpretation of sport graphics and sport objects. Measuring the sports impact and associated graphics with emotions; sounds that date the sport or strengthen our memories of them, photographs of objects and people from different periods, images of industrial, sport, agrarian and city landscapes to remind us of the dominant role played by sport/graphics or that sport object in the country of its origin.

ARTGR 483X. Science + Design: Interpretation of Natural Resources in Montana. (Cross-listed with NREM 483X). (1-4) Cr.3. F. Prereq: ARTGR 271 or BIOL 211 or graduate classification, and permission of instructor. Interdisciplinary service-learning. Design and production of natural resource related interpretive signs for Montana natural areas. Field-work experience followed by on-campus studio.

ARTGR 489X. Design Ethics. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Junior/Senior classification.  Historical and contemporary issues in ethics and decision-making related to visual arts, related visual communication, and design disciplines, including education/training, professional practice and research, the social role of design, and the implications and consequences of designed artifacts and systems.

ARTGR 583X. Science + Design: Interpretation of Natural Resources in Montana. (Cross-listed with NREM 583X). (1-4) Cr.3. F. Prereq: ARTGR 271 or BIOL 211 or graduate classification, and permission of instructor. Interdisciplinary service-learning. Design and production of natural resource related interpretive signs for Montana natural areas. Field-work experience followed by on-campus studio.

ARTIS 170X. Exploring the Visual Arts. (3-0) Cr.3. Visual arts and how it relates to individuals, their community, and the importance in a cultural and global context. Understand vocabulary of the visual arts, and develop strategies for observation and critical thinking through assignments including reflective writing and observational analysis on various works of art. Engage with various visual art topics and disciplines such as: defining what art is, learning about types of art and its use and meaning of materials, how art plays a role in the expression of humanity, and how personal awareness and perspective can benefit from the engagement of art.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

B

B M S 438X. Principles of Physiology. (Dual- listed with 538). (4-0) Cr 4. F. Prereq: BIOL 212, BIOL 212L. Principles of human normal neurophysiology, endocrine and reproductive physiology, muscle physiology, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, and digestive physiology, and regulation of body fluid.

B M S 503X. Fundamentals of Biomedical Sciences . (1-0) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: Admission to B M S Graduate Program. Institutional training essential for biomedical research, orientation to institutional career services and communication resources, professional development activities and practice with critical evaluation of data presentation and interpretation in biomedical literature.

B M S 535X. Molecular and Cellular Basis of Disease. (1-0) Cr. 1. F. Prereqs: Graduate student status. Descriptions of molecular and cellular biology, especially as it pertains to veterinary medicine. Discussions of cellular components, cellular functions and anomalies thereof. Emphasis placed on divergences relevant to companion animals and livestock.

BBMB 445X. Molecular Signaling. (Dual-listed with BBMB 545X). (2-0) Cr. 2. Alt. S (offered 2022). Prereqs: BBMB 405 or BBMB 420; or BBMB 506 and BBMB 507. Molecular mechanisms of cellular signaling including receptor activation, desensitization and cross talk, signal transduction pathways, nuclear receptors, growth factor and extracellular matrix activators, protein kinases, caspase and transcription factor downstream signals, and lipids, gases and cyclic nucleotides as regulators of cell signaling. Course content includes current literature, student and instructor presentations and, for BBMB 545 students only, research proposal writing and review.

BBMB 498X. Research through Scientific Literature. (2-0) Cr. 2. Repeatable. F.S. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in BBMB 404 or BBMB 504. Examination and discussion of current research and review articles in biochemistry, biophysics, and molecular biology. Critical evaluation and scrutiny of scientific data in journal articles.

BBMB 531X. Plant Biochemistry. (2-0) Cr. 2. F. Prereqs: BBMB 301 or equivalent. In-depthexploration of plant biochemistry with a focus on the unique aspects ofplants versus heterotrophic organisms. Analysis of unique pathways, metabolic trafficking between unique organelles and tissues, and techniques for their characterization.

BBMB 545X. Molecular Signaling. (Dual-listed with BBMB 445X). (2-0) Cr. 2. Alt. S (offered 2022). Prereqs: BBMB 405 or BBMB 420; or BBMB 506 and BBMB 507. Molecular mechanisms of cellular signaling including receptor activation, desensitization and cross talk, signal transduction pathways, nuclear receptors, growth factor and extracellular matrix activators, protein kinases, caspase and transcription factor downstream signals, and lipids, gases and cyclic nucleotides as regulators of cell signaling. Course content includes current literature, student and instructor presentations and, for BBMB 545 students only, research proposal writing and review.

BBMB 549X. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. (Cross-listed with CHEM 549X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: any one of the following: CHEM 324, CHEM 325, BBMB 461, BBMB 561. Theoretical principles of NMR, practical aspects of experimental NMR, solution and solid state NMR, methodologies for molecule characterization, protein structure determination, NMR relaxation, and recent advances.

BCB 523X. Mathematical Modeling in Biology . (Dual-listed with MATH 423X; Cross-listed with MATH 523X and BCBIO 423X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MATH 266 or equivalent; MATH 265 or equivalent recommended. Introduction to mathematical techniques for modeling and simulation, parameter identification, and analysis of biological systems. Applications drawn from many branches of biology and medicine. Apply differential equations, difference equations, and dynamical systems theory to a wide array of biological problems.

BCB 693X. Entrepreneurship for Graduate Students in Science and Engineering. (Cross-listed with AGRON 693X, E E 693X, ENGR 693X, GENET 693X, and M E 693X). (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.  Prereq: Graduate student status and completion of at least one semester of graduate coursework. Understanding key topics of starting a technology based company, from development of technology-led idea to early-stage entrepreneurial business. Concepts discussed include: entrepreneurship basics, starting a business, funding your business, protecting your technology/business IP.Subject matter experts and successful, technology-based entrepreneurs will provide real world examples from their experience with entrepreneurship. Learn about the world class entrepreneurship ecosystem at ISU and Central Iowa. Satisfactory-fail only.

BCBIO 423X. Mathematical Modeling in Biology . (Dual-listed with MATH 523X; Cross-listed with MATH 423X and BCB 523X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MATH 266 or equivalent; MATH 265 or equivalent recommended. Introduction to mathematical techniques for modeling and simulation, parameter identification, and analysis of biological systems. Applications drawn from many branches of biology and medicine. Apply differential equations, difference equations, and dynamical systems theory to a wide array of biological problems.

BIOL 113X. Exploring Possibilities in Life Sciences. (Cross-listed with GEN 113X). (1-0) Cr. 1. Seminar focusing on introducing students to life science fields and careers. Explores interdisciplinary career paths and guidance on strategies for success in achieving career goals. Satisfactory-fail only.

BIOL 114X. Experiential Learning and Explorations in Life Sciences. (Cross-listed with GEN 114X). (1-0) Cr. 1. A second year experiential learning course focused on careers in life science fields. Sections offer themed learning allowing students to choose an immersive experience in an area of interest. Sections utilize hands-on engagement, field trips to on- and off-campus locations, and small group discussions with speakers working in different life science careers. Satisfactory-fail only.

BIOL 299X. Introduction to Undergraduate Research. (Cross-listed with GEN 299X). Cr. 1-2. F.S.SS. Identify a research opportunity on campus and conduct guided research under the supervision.

BIOL 358X. Bee Biology, Management, and Beekeeping. (Cross-listed with ENT 358X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Introductory (200-level)biology coursework or Permission of instructor. Bee diversity and evolution, ecology, role as pollinators, behavior, anatomy, and development. Management of bees as agricultural pollinators and honey producers, focusing on honey bees. Working with live bee hives and demonstration of practical beekeeping skills will occur during several field trips to local hives.

BIOL 375X. Marine Ecology and Ecosystems Dynamics. (Cross-listed with A ECL 375X and ENSCI 375X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: BIOL 211 and completion or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 212. Overview of the ecological processes, ecosystems, and biodiversity in marine environments. Ever-changing dynamics caused by environmental disturbances, internal forces, or by human impacts on species and ecosystems.

BIOL 395X. Professional Development in Biological Sciences- Exploring Experiential Learning. (2-0). Cr. 2. F. Find, prepare, and apply for research assistantships with ISU faculty, pre-health shadowing opportunities, and summer research internships with business partners, non-profit organizations, and governmental agencies.

BIOL 403X. Inroduction to Pathology II. (Cross-listed with V PTH 403X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: V PTH 402/BIOL 402. Continuation of pathology topics begun in V PTH/BIOL VPTH 402. How specific organ systems respond to injury using principles and information covered in VPTH 402/ BIOL 402. Study of a set of prototypical diseases that affect humans and animals.

BIOL 466X. Molecular and Genome Evolution . (Cross-listed with GEN 466X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: BIOL 315, BIOL 313 or GEN 313. It is now possible to sequence and study genomes with astonishing precision and depth. Every day brings new discoveries about life, about genomes, about the molecular evolution of organisms and their genomes, and how these features are shaped by the evolutionary processes of drift and selection. Explore fundamentals of gene and genome evolution, and how these processes are shaped by ecological context and organismal history.

BUSAD 105X. Exploration of Majors & Careers in Business . (2-0) Cr. 1. F.S. Exploration course providing in-depth information and education regarding majors and related careers in business, with the goal for students of making a decision on which business major(s) to pursue. 8 week course. Satisfactory-Fail.

C

C DEV 501X. Foundations of Community Development . (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Introduction to the philosophy, techniques, and methodologies of community development relative to engagement, planning, evaluation, economic analysis, leadership and capacity building. The purpose of the course is to engage students in some of the kinds of activities community development professionals often encounter and develop a broad understanding of the application of that work.

C E 190X. Introduction to Undergraduate Research in Civil and Environmental Engineering . (Cross-listed with ENV E). Cr. 2. Repeatable. Prereq: Permission of instructor . Introduction to research, focusing on sub-disciplines of civil engineering. Research questions, hypotheses, literature reviews, experimental design, data collection, data analysis, and presentation. Topics chosen to introduce students to water resources, environmental engineering, transportation engineering, geotechnical/materials engineering, or structural engineering. Only two credits may count toward graduation in C E.

C E 462X.  Site Evaluations for Civil Engineering Projects. (2-3) Cr. 3. Prereq: C E 360 or instructor approval. Identification and mapping of engineering soils from aerial photos, maps, and soil surveys. Planning subsurface investigations, geomaterials prospecting, geotechnical hazards, geomorphology, in situ testing and sampling, geophysical site characterization, instrumentation and monitoring, interpretation of engineering parameter values for design.

C E 555X. Traffic Flow Theories for Existing and Emerging Modes. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: C E 355 and 3 credits in statistics or probability. Introduction to the classic traffic flow theories and the recent developments in autonomous vehicles. Models and theories that characterize the flow of traffic in its many facets, including human factor, automation, and traffic control. Project based learning method. Work in teams and apply analytical methods to study time-dependent traffic networks, probabilistic queuing systems and the mixed environment of autonomous and human-operated vehicles.

C E 574X.  Integrated Assessment Modeling and Science-Policy Integration for Global Environmental Change. (3-0). Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Graduate standing; courses in programming (e.g., C E 160), statistics (e.g., STAT 305), water resources (e.g., C E 372, ENSCI 402). Overview of conceptual insights and quantitative analysis of global climate change with a focus on physical models and policy implications. State-of-the-art Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs) within a context of water sustainability with implications to the energy, food, and environmental sectors. Water resources related environmental management and problem-solving under global change. Climate modeling and impacts of climate change on water, energy, and food systems. Application of Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs) in understanding the water-energy-food nexus. National and international climate policy.

C E 594YX. Spl Topics in Construction Engr and Mgt: Engineering for Disaster and Climate Resilience. Cr. 3. Alt. F. (Offered in 2021).  Prereq: Senior classification or permission of instructor. The course is intended to provide engineering and non-engineering students with inter-disciplinary approaches to principles of engineering and planning for hazard risk reduction and climate change adaptation nationally and globally. Topics include traditional phases of disaster management, resilience theories and practices, vulnerability and risk assessments for disasters and climate change, system-of-systems design problems for civil infrastructure systems, project management tools, and exploration of current policy trends in areas of disaster and climate change resilience. Focus will be on the application of engineering in communities exposed or prone to disasters and climate change, humanitarian response, and development. Students will learn methods (systems dynamics, social network analysis, agent-based simulation GIS) to engage with marginalized communities on addressing complex and uncertain problems using systems thinking, inter-disciplinary approaches, partnerships and policy.

C J 120X. The Criminal Justice League Learning Community Seminar . (1-0) Cr. 1. Orientation to academic program requirements, career awareness, strategies for successful transition to college. Topics include: University and LAS College requirements and procedures; occupational tracks and career options open to criminal justice; and introduction to career planning. Satisfactory-Fail.

C J 121X. The Criminal Justice League Learning Community Seminar II . (1-0) Cr. 1. Foundations for student success in the criminal justice major. Students will examine current issues in crime and criminal justice and build career awareness and planning skills through guest speakers and field trips. Offered Satisfactory-Fail only.

C J 354X.  Prevention of Crime and Delinquency . (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: C J 240.  Introduction to various efforts to prevent crime and juvenile delinquency, as well as the reduction of specific risk factors for both. Theories that provide the baseline for various approaches to prevention, as well as the development, operation and effectiveness of prevention efforts centered in various social institutions such as the family, schools, neighborhoods/communities, religion and the media. Examine programs originating from within the traditional criminal justice institutions of the police, courts, and correctional systems

C J 360X. Latinas and Victimization. (Cross-listed with US LS 360X). (3-0). Cr. 3. S. Intersections of race/ethnicity, class, gender, culture, acculturation, and immigration/migration in the victimization experiences of Latina women interacting with criminal justice systems and services. Topics include: domestic/intimate partner violence, sexual assault, human trafficking among Hispanic, Latina, and Chicana women, and the impact of language barriers, abuser threats of deportation, social and institutional discrimination and racism, cultural norms, and cultural insensitivity among first responders and service providers on help-seeking, well-being, and interactions with the criminal justice system.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

C J 451X.  Contemporary Issues in Policing . (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: C J 351 and Criminal Justice major.  Introduction to contemporary issues in policing in the United States. Topics include: the media/law enforcement relationship, cultural competence for police, use of technology, and career foundations for hiring and advancement. Scenario-based learning in individual and group settings will help students to grasp the challenges next generation leaders will face in policing.

C R P 593X. Field Trip. Cr. 1-2. F.S.SS. Repeatable. Prereq: Graduate standing; C R P major or permission of instructor. Field travel, either domestic or international, to observe and analyze local professional planning practices and to provide firsthand exposure to the destination community and its residents. Satisfactory-Fail.

C R P 598X. Comprehensive Exam Preparation. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. F.S.SS irr. Prereq: Advanced standing in MCRP program with required courses completed or simultaneously in progress. Preparation to complete the capstone requirement for the MCRP program, which is a comprehensive exam that will be administered as part of this course. Material based on content of required courses and electives as well as study and test-taking strategies. Ideally taken in the Fall semester of a student's second academic year immediately prior to graduation. Satisfactory-fail only.

CH E 290X. Introduction to Undergraduate Research/Independent Study. (3-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Introduction to independent study with emphasis on skills necessary to pursue further independent study of a topic of special interest to student and faculty. Topics may include introductions to laboratory safety, standard operating procedures, design of experiments, data analysis, computational methods, literature searches, and professional communications. Pre-enrollment contract between student and instructor required. Satisfactory-Fail.

CH E 499X. Applied Industrial Research. (9-0). Cr. 3. Repeatable. Prereq:  CH E 205, CH E 210, and Permission of the Instructor. Application of core chemical engineering concepts to solve industrially-sponsored process design problems in teams. Introduction to literature review and analysis, intellectual property, and project management.

CH E 580X. Introduction of Project Management for Thesis Research. (Cross-listed with I E 580X and M S E 580X). (1-0) Cr. 1. F.S. Tools and skills of Project Management (PM) adapted from industry to improve efficiency in thesis research. Project charter initiation for thesis, timeline and meeting scheduling tools, expectation management, and communication with advisors. Practice of the PM skills using student’s own thesis. Presentation of a project charter. Demonstration of knowledge of related PM skills and the ability of utilizing these skills for thesis research. Sharing thesis ideas and learning experiencein the Graduate for Advancing Professional Skills (GAPS) learning community. Satisfactory-fail grading only.

CHEM 549X. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. (Cross-listed with BBMB 549X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: any one of the following: CHEM 324, CHEM 325, BBMB 461, BBMB 561. Theoretical principles of NMR, practical aspects of experimental NMR, solution and solid state NMR, methodologies for molecule characterization, protein structure determination, NMR relaxation, and recent advances.

CL ST 410X. Soul, Mind, and World in Ancient Greek Philosophy. (Cross-listed with PHIL 410X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: At least 6 credits of Philosophy or Classical Studies. Prominent theories of soul and mind developed by Greek philosophers in the classical period (roughly 500 BCE-200 CE).Special attention paid to the ways these thinkers locate their psychological theories within their general metaphysical views, for example the way Aristotle locates his theory of soul and body within his general theory of form and matter.The primary goal is to understand these theories on their own terms but among the issues to be covered are several of continuing interest in philosophy, such as the relationship between mind and body and the possibility of weakness of the will.Philosophers to be studied include Plato, Aristotle, and some of their predecessors and successors.

COM S 192X. Explorations in Computing Research I. (.5-.5). Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S. Explore research opportunities for undergraduate students in Computer Science; understanding the nature of research and development process; reviewing the literature; development of writing, presentation, and data reporting skills; rotation under different research labs; group work.

COM S 488X. Computer Networks. (Dual-listed with COM S 588X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: COM S 352 or CPR E 308. Fundamental concepts in the design and implementation of computer communication in both wired and wireless networks, their protocols, and applications. Topics include the layered network architecture in the Internet, applications, transport, network, and data link layers and their protocols, Socket API, software-defined networking, and network security. Lectures organized in a top-down approach to cover the layers of network design.

COM S 579X. Natural Language Processing . (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: COM S 474/574 or Com S 573. Introduction to NLP and its connection with other branches of Artificial Intelligence, such as machine learning and knowledge representation. Text analysis including n-gram language models, stemming and lemmatization, part-of-speech (POS) tagging. Topic modeling, summarization, text classification, knowledge extraction, and text reasoning. Applications of deep learning in NLP including question answering, machine reading comprehension, word and sentence embedding. Research project required.

COM S 588X. Computer Networks. (Dual-listed with COM S 488X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: COM S 352 or CPR E 308. Fundamental concepts in the design and implementation of computer communication in both wired and wireless networks, their protocols, and applications. Topics include the layered network architecture in the Internet, applications, transport, network, and data link layers and their protocols, Socket API, software-defined networking, and network security. Lectures organized in a top-down approach to cover the layers of network design.

CPR E 287X. Cyber-Physical System Fundamentals. (2-2) Cr. 3. Prereq: Engr 160 or equivalent. Fundamentals of cyber-physical systems, including introduction to digital systems design, embedded platforms and programming, sensing and actuation, and performance analysis. Introduction to data communication concepts, including systems-level view of signal processing and electronic circuits, networking standards and protocols. Laboratory exercises with embedded circuits, signals, and measurement applications.

CPR E 301X. ECSEL Leadership Studio. (Cross-listed with E E 301X). (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S. Introductory leadership course provides emerging student leaders with an understanding of effective leadership practices, social change strategies, and information on engagement opportunities on campus and in the community. Students will be expected to connect course content to their lives, critically analyze their experiences, and to become civically engaged in society.

CPR E 437X. Introduction to Wireless Security . (Cross-listed with CYB E 437X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: CPR E 331 or CPR E 430. With communication and network services and applications increasingly leveraging wireless media, the importance of information and network security in the wireless domain continues to grow. The challenges of providing secure communication and network services are considerably more difficult in wireless environments than in traditional wired systems (e.g., the Internet), so the focus of the course will be purely wireless covering both networking issues and security aspects of modern wireless environments. Fundamentals of mobile LANs and WANs, ad hoc, sensor networks/internet of things and cloud, mobile IP/TCP, confidentiality, key establishment, authentication, broadcasting, RFIDs, and rogue attacks.

CPR E 482X. Hardware Design for Machine Learning. (3-3) Cr. 4. Prereqs: CPR E 381 or COM S 321. Introduction to hardware architectures for machine learning. Full system view – machinelearning frameworks to hardware interface to hardware architecture. General purpose CPU extensions for machine learning. GPU extensions for machine learning. Spatial architec-tures for machine learning. Performance, energy, and accuracy trade-offs. Hardware designoptimizations for machine learning, including quantization, data re-use, SIMD, and SIMT. Lab section will culminate with the design and evaluation of an application-specific machinelearning accelerator.

CPR E 562X. Secure Software Engineering. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq:  CPR E 308 or COM S 352. Fundamentals and techniques to design and implement software systems. Assessment of security vulnerabilities in software systems, exploitation of software vulnerabilities, and methods to secure vulnerable software. Secure coding practices, data analytics for security, microservices and cloud services security. Reverse engineering and security assessment of cyber-physical systems.

CPR E 563X. Advanced Data Storage Systems. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: CPR E 308 OR COM S 352. Focus on how to keep valuable digital data (e.g., scientific computations, financial transactions, family photos) safely in modern computer systems. Fundamentals of data storage technologies including state of the art. Topics include storage hardware, Linux file systems, and warehouse-scale big data storage, with an emphasis on the design tradeoffs for robustness and security. Team projects based on high-impact open-source systems.

CPR E 595X. Independent Study. Cr. 1-3. F.S.SS. Investigation of an approved topic commensurate with the student's prerequisites.

CPS 364X. Cyber-Physical Systems Application. (Cross-listed with AER E 364X). (2-2) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: ENGR 160 or equivalent course; credit or enrollment in MATH 267; knowledge of Python. Fundamental principles of cyber-physical systems and their system-level applications at an introductory level; introduction to radio control systems and control of actuators; computer programming of physical systems; data processing and communication; control loops; X-by-wire control systems; simulation; testing of control loops.

CYB E 398X. Cooperative Edcuation (Co-op). Prereq: Permission of department and Engineering Career Services . Professional work period. One semester per academic or calendar year. Students must register for this course before commencing work. Satisfactory - Fail.

CYB E 437X. Introduction to Wireless Security . (Cross-listed with CPR E 437X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: CPR E 331 or CPR E 430. With communication and network services and applications increasingly leveraging wireless media, the importance of information and network security in the wireless domain continues to grow. The challenges of providing secure communication and network services are considerably more difficult in wireless environments than in traditional wired systems (e.g., the Internet), so the focus of the course will be purely wireless covering both networking issues and security aspects of modern wireless environments. Fundamentals of mobile LANs and WANs, ad hoc, sensor networks/internet of things and cloud, mobile IP/TCP, confidentiality, key establishment, authentication, broadcasting, RFIDs, and rogue attacks.

D

DIET 531X. Nutrition Therapy for Eating Disorders. Cr. 3. Repeatable. Prereq: Enrollment in MFCS-Dietetics and a course in medical nutrition therapy or consent of instructor. An online study of eating disorders management and nutrition care. Topics include eating disorders medical complications, clinical care guidelines, basic pharmacology, clinical nutrition education, nutrition care planning, psychology of eating disorders, team collaboration, and therapeutic modalities for nutrition counseling.

DSN S 118X. Global Design Connection Learning Community Orientation. Cr. .5. Repeatable. For International students and interested domestic students registered in the College of Design Core Program. Orientation to the College of Design cultural community. Introduction to cross-cultural communication strategies and inclusion. Weekly meetings will include the introduction of culture, discussion of cultural differences and similarities and barriers to communication, as well as conversations on how to promote cultural learning and understanding throughout the College of Design, Iowa State University and the greater Ames Community. Satisfactory - Fail.

DSN S 304X. Global Challenges: Intro to UN Sustainable Development Goals. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals — also known as the SDGs or the Global Goals —cover a wide range of sustainability issues; highlighting local, national and international priority areas to end poverty and hunger, improve health and education, make cities more sustainable and combat climate change. Students are empowered & challenged to become self-directed as they explore each issue individually and collectively from a personal, academic and professional perspective.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

DSN S 340XDesign Entrepreneurship. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Focus on the interconnection between entrepreneurial thinking and applied design practices of innovation. Explores several business management tools, models and frameworks, relating it to the development of design projects. Critical areas for successful growth, open innovation, and entrepreneurial mindset. Designer entrepreneurs are more attuned to the social and meaningful values of their creations, than economical growth for an industrial venture. Social impact, inclusive responsibility, future foresight and change mindset are the key motors of their dive into innovation and creative problem-solving. By developing an attitude towards risk-taking, initiative, uncertainty and creative leaps, the course is substantiated by strategy planning and leadership skill sets that allow students to turn their innovative ideas and conceptual solutions into products (or services or experiences), and to distribute them in a viable market and/or a business venture.

DSN S 501X. Introduction to Research Design. Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Admission into a graduate program or senior standing . Introduction to research design and methodology in social science research. Essential knowledge and skills required to frame and conduct research independently. Emphasizes various aspects of research design including: foundations of research; understanding research -related concepts; research ethics; developing research questions; reviewing literature and theory; critiquing and evaluating research studies; exploring data collection and analysis; writing research proposal and presenting findings to a diverse audience.

E

E E 301X. ECSEL Leadership Studio. (Cross-listed with CPR E 301X). Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S. Introductory leadership course provides emerging student leaders with an understanding of effective leadership practices, social change strategies, and information on engagement opportunities on campus and in the community. Students will be expected to connect course content to their lives, critically analyze their experiences, and to become civically engaged in society.

E E 411X. Wave Propagation and Transmission Lines. Cr. 3. S. Pre-req: E E 311. Time varying Maxwell’s equations; wave equation in an unbounded generally lossy (multi-layered) media; uniform plane waves, dielectric constant, propagation, attenuation and phase constants; wave impedance; phase and group velocities; wave polarization; reflection and transmission coefficients (at oblique incidence) at boundaries (conducting and dielectric); Doppler effect; transmission lines; propagation, attenuation, phase constants; phase velocity; characteristic impedance; load impedance and its influence; reflection and transmission coefficients; cascaded transmission lines; steady-state voltage and current; standing waves; SWR; Smith chart; matching techniques including, quarter-wave matching, single and double stub matching.

E E 515X. Passive Microwave Circuit Design. (3-0). Cr. 3. Repeatable. Prereq: E E 311. Introduction to concepts, foundations, knowledge and applications that are uniquely related to engineering component and system designs and issues at microwave frequencies. Microwave network theory and the use of scattering matrix. Design criteria for waveguide and coaxial microwave components. Application of these components in the design of useful systems such as radars, testing systems, receivers, etc. Work in small teams to design, fabricate, and test useful microwave components and system, which may be designed using microstripline technology.

E E 592X. Seminar in Electical Engineering. Cr. 1-4. Repeatable. F.S. Technical seminar presentations on topics in various areas in electrical engineering. It will have the following sections, corresponding to graduate study areas in the department: Bioengineering; Communications, signal processing, and machine learning; Electric power and energy systems; Electromagnetic, microwave, and nondestructive evaluation; Microelectronics and photonics; Systems and controls; and VLSI. Satisfactory-Fail.

E E 623X. High-Dimensional Probability and Linear Algebra for Machine Learning. (Cross-listed with MATH 623X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MATH 510 or MATH 507; E E 523 or STAT 542. Key topics from non-asymptotic random matrix theory: Bounds on minimum and maximum singular values of many classes of high-dimensional random matrices, and on sums of a large number of random matrices. Chaining. Other linear algebra and probability concepts commonly used in Theoretical Machine Learning research. Discussion of recent papers in this area.

E E 693X.  Entrepreneurship for Graduate Students in Science and Engineering . (Cross-listed with AGRON 693X, BCB 693X, ENGR 693X, GENET 693X, and M E 693X). (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.  Prereq: Graduate student status and completion of at least one semester of graduate coursework. Understanding key topics of starting a technology based company, from development of technology-led idea to early-stage entrepreneurial business. Concepts discussed include: entrepreneurship basics, starting a business, funding your business, protecting your technology/business IP. Subject matter experts and successful, technology-based entrepreneurs will provide real world examples from their experience with entrepreneurship. Learn about the world class entrepreneurship ecosystem at ISU and Central Iowa. Satisfactory-fail only.

E M 580X. Phase Transformations and Plasticity. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: E M 566 or E M 567 or permission of instructor. Continuum approaches to phase transformations and plasticity at nano-, micro-, and macroscales. Interaction between phase transformations and plasticity and different scales. Temperature-, stress-, and strain-induced phase transformations. Transformation-induced plasticity. Thermodynamics and kinetics. Nucleation and growth. Large strain formulation. High pressure phenomena and theories.

E M 585X. Continuum Mechanochemistry. (2-1) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: EM 566 Phase Transformations in Elastic Materials or consent of instructor. Continuum mechanical, thermomechanical, and kinetic fundamentals of the effect of stresses and strains on chemical reactions, phase transformations, diffusion, and compositional changes. Mechanochemical phenomena. Large strain formulation. High pressure mechanochemistry: multiscale approach. Mechanics of oxidation. Lithiation and delithiation of silicon electrodes. Nanovoid formation due to Kirkendall effect.

E M 586X. Micromechanics of Structural Changes in Materials. (2-1) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: E M 566 or permission of instructor. Continuum and micromechanical approaches to material deformation, phase transformations, and microstructure evolution. Thermodynamics and kinetics. Eshelby inclusion. Interface propagation and re-orientation. Microscale phase field approach. Large strain formulation. Phase transformations, chemical reactions, twinning, and fracture.

ECON 194X. Special Topics in Economics. Cr. 1. Repeatable. 8 week course. Instructor-arranged topics exploring economics concept and tools.

ECON 271X. Introduction to Data Analysis in Agri-Food Industry. Cr. 3. S. Prereq: ECON 101. Introduction to quantitative methods for economic decision making. Examples from agricultural and natural resource economics presented using spreadsheet software tools such as Microsoft Excel.

ECON 383X. Economics of Innovation . Cr. 3. F.  Prereq: ECON 101. Key concepts in the economics of innovation. Definition and measure of innovation; useful mental frameworks in understanding innovation; factors that drive innovation; and policies and actions that impact direction and rate of innovation.

ECON 410X. Experimental Economics. Cr. 3. Prereq: ECON 301. Introduction to experimental economics and major subject areas addressed by laboratory and field experiments. Topics include an introduction to the technique of using laboratory experimental methods to test economic theories, understanding economic behavior, and conducting field experiments. Additional topics will introduce students to human subjects review, experimental design, writing a literature review, and the study of a series of experiments: markets, individual decision-making, asset markets, behavioral game theory, and neuroeconomics.

ECON 511X. Research Seminar in Experimental Economics . Cr. 3. F.  Prereq: ECON 510.  Design, conduct, interpret, and report on economic experiments. Preparation of a potentially publishable experimental research paper. Topics vary according to student interest.

ECON 531X. Trends Impacting Agri-Food Businesses. Cr. 2. F. Prereq: Enrollment in The Ivy Executive MBA program within the Ivy College of Business at Iowa State University. Explore trends impacting agricultural and food businesses. Video interviews with a range of entrepreneurs, investors and industry experts will expose students to a variety of ideas and opinions on the most important trends and issues impacting the future structure of agri-food markets and explore the implications for agri-food businesses. In addition, students will be challenged to develop their own ideas about how these trends will impact their business and career.

ECON 594X. Research Methods in Economics I . Cr. 1. F. Prereq: Graduate status or permission of instructor. Introduction to methods used in empirical economic research. Formulation of well-posed economic questions, locating and evaluating relevant literature, and meaning of testable hypotheses.

ECON 595X. Research Methods in Economics II. (1-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Graduate status or permission of instructor. Develop skills required to successfully acquire, manipulate and analyze data that can be used for conducting empirical economic research. Topics include research design, developing workflows that support reproducible analysis, data visualization and related issues. Hands on work with one or more example data sets to gain experience and confidence in using statistical software and interpreting the results of this analysis.

ECON 596X. Research Methods in Economics III. (1-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Graduate status or permission of instructor. Formulation of the research question, problem identification, literature review, data identification, formulation and testing of hypotheses, and presentation of research results. Lectures will build on assigned readings, and cover components of applied economic research, and writing skills. Student research presentations and lectures by invited speakers. Students develop their creative component in a “hands on” environment where the instructor and others can offer guidance.

EDADM 626X. Equitable School Finance . (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Graduate standing. Examine the equitable management of a school district’s financial responsibilities. Coursework addresses the role of the federal, state, and local governments in educational finance, tax issues, and structures; bonding; budgeting procedures; and financial analysis and accountability. Student attendance required at the annual Iowa School Business Management Academy.

EDUC 583X. Inequality & Schooling in the U.S. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Graduate status. General introduction to the disciplinary tools of social and cultural studies to examine historical and contemporary inequalities and attempts to disrupt them in U.S. schools. Required for all TLLP doctoral students.

EDUC 608X. Social Media and Education. (Cross-listed with HCI 608X). Cr. 3. Prereq: 12 graduate credits. Increase understanding of how social media is changing traditional concepts of identity, literacy, citizenship and more. Develop an online social presence through active social media participation.

EL PS 651X. Social Foundations of P-20 Schooling in the United States. Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Admission into ED.D. Introduction to the historical and contemporary landscape of P-20 schooling in the United States. Emphasis on topics and tensions in the relationship between school and society (e.g. equity of access to education and competing purposes of education) and the implications of these topics and tensions for teaching, learning, and leadership in schools across the P-20 continuum.

EL PS 652X.Theory of Inclusive Leadership & Organizations. Cr 3. Prereqs: Admission to the Education Doctorate program. Theory of inclusive leadership and organizations for the Education Doctorate program in the School of Education. Topics for practitioner-scholars related to educational leadership, current issues in the field, and program success.

EL PS 655X. Qualitative Inquiry in P-20 Education. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Admission to the Ed.D. in Education program. Qualitative research approaches and methods for applied research in P-20 education settings; research designs, data collection, and data analysis with a focus on action research.

EL PS 657X. Dissertation in Practice Seminar. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F. SS (irr.). Pre-reqs: Admission to ED.D degree program. Development of dissertation in practice proposal. Formulating research questions, theoretical/conceptual frameworks, literature review, research design, and methodology.

ENGR 203X. Engineering Career and Employment Preparation . (1-0) Cr. 1. F.S.SS. Development of practical career knowledge and skills such as understanding employers of engineers, determining career goals, identifying employers of interest, developing effective application materials, applying for positions, networking, interviewing, and evaluating offers. Overview of professional resources and tools available to aid in the employment process. Offered Satisfactory-Fail only.

ENGR 375X. Introduction to Global Engineering. (Cross-listed with A B E 375X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Junior classification in engineering, or instructor permission. Focus will be on preparing future engineers to be change-makers, peacemakers, social entrepreneurs, and facilitators of sustainable human development, and equip them with the tools, knowledge, global perspective, and entrepreneurial mindset required to solve the world’s most pressing issues. Understanding the role that engineers play in sustainable human development, global engineering, and international development. Faculty and guest speakers with first-hand experience and subject matter expertise will provide real-world insights and a practical framework for conducting small-scale engineering projects in low income countries through a combination of community development practices, appropriate technologies, and engineering project management.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

ENGR 538X. Foundations of Engineering Education. (Cross-listed with HG ED 538X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Engineering graduate students or instructor permission required. Introduction to the field of engineering education, with an emphasis on engineering education history, existing challenges, teaching and learning pedagogies and theories, research opportunities, and research methodologies. The course goal is to develop students as scholars and to have students think critically about engineering and education. Students will apply the knowledge gained from this course to propose a research project related to their own discipline. The proposal is intended to help students learn and apply the key elements of engineering education research. This course is intended for students with a variety of interests and career goals, including those interested in learning to conduct engineering education research, exploring research discoveries about teaching and learning, and engaging with the engineering education community.

ENGR 693X. Entrepreneurship for Graduate Students in Science and Engineering. (Cross-listed with AGRON 693X, BCB 693X, E E 693X, GENET 693X, and M E 693X). (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.  Prereq: Graduate student status and completion of at least one semester of graduate coursework. Understanding key topics of starting a technology based company, from development of technology-led idea to early-stage entrepreneurial business. Concepts discussed include: entrepreneurship basics, starting a business, funding your business, protecting your technology/business IP.Subject matter experts and successful, technology-based entrepreneurs will provide real world examples from their experience with entrepreneurship. Learn about the world class entrepreneurship ecosystem at ISU and Central Iowa. Satisfactory-fail only.

ENSCI 375X. Marine Ecology and Ecosystems Dynamics. (Cross-listed with AN S 375X and BIOL 375X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: BIOL 211 and completion or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 212. Overview of the ecological processes, ecosystems, and biodiversity in marine environments. Ever-changing dynamics caused by environmental disturbances, internal forces, or by human impacts on species and ecosystems.

ENT 240X. Hemp: Potential and Constraints for a New Crop. (Cross-listed with AGRON 240X). (2-0). Cr. 2. History, biology, and agronomy of hemp as it is allowed to be grown in Iowa.

ENT 358X. Bee Biology, Management, and Beekeeping. (Cross-listed with BIOL 358X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Introductory (200-level)biology coursework or Permission of instructor. Bee diversity and evolution, ecology, role as pollinators, behavior, anatomy, and development. Management of bees as agricultural pollinators and honey producers, focusing on honey bees. Working with live bee hives and demonstration of practical beekeeping skills will occur during several field trips to local hives.

ENTSP 430X. Real-time Case Study of an Ames Entrepreneurial Startup. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq. Sophomore status. Inside look at an entrepreneurial consumer packaged goods startup in real-time. Topics include product design, materials, manufacturing, supply chain, finance, legal, management, strategy, market research, marketing (positioning, differentiation, target market, claims), sales, distribution, customer service, positioning the company as an acquisition candidate, maximizing valuation, ownership and how shares are awarded, and anything else related to business survival and growth.

ENTSP 454X. Entrepreneurial Marketing. (Cross-listed with MKT 454X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MKT 340. Basic understanding of marketing for those interested in creating or working for a start-up or an innovation-oriented company or consultancy. Relevant to marketing roles in entrepreneurial firms across both B2B and B2C markets. Integrates theory and practice, and provides insight into how entrepreneurs take both strategic and tactical marketing decisions in uncertain business environments. For hands-on perspective, incorporates projects involving real-world marketing problems confronting start-ups, and guest talks from entrepreneurs and frequent case analyses.

ENTSP 461X. Entrepreneurship and Accounting Information . (Cross-listed with ACCT 461X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: ACCT 284. Accounting information recording, dissemination, and use by entrepreneurs. Introduces pro forma financials, venture capital, private equity, and state and federal regulations for business creation and formation. Other topics include intrapreneurship, intellectual property, information privacy, cybersecurity, and internal controls, including managing the risk of embezzlement.

ENTSP 520X. Corporate Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Technology Management . (Cross-listed with MGMT 520X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: Graduate classification. Management of venture creation and innovation at large and established organizations. New ideas, concepts, and techniques on how to stimulate and exploit innovative activities to make established firms not only more responsive and flexible, but also more proactive and opportunity-creating. Related approaches combine activities targeted at the individual, team, organization, industry, regional, national and global level. Introduction to how today's large and established corporations (1) identify, develop and exploit innovative opportunities, (2) manage product development processes, and (3) create, spin-in, spin-off and manage new innovative ventures. This case-based course introduces emerging, non-traditional, evidence-based approaches, such as agile product development, design-thinking, entrepreneurial leadership, entrepreneurial ecosystems, open innovation and blue-ocean strategies.

ENTSP 570X. Launching your Startup: Proof of Concept and Financial Viability. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: ENTSP 566. Designed to aid students who are actively pursuing a venture that has progressed beyond the ideation stage of development – and is possibly launched or launch-imminent. Addresses operational challenges in launching a new venture in its very formative stage. Attention is devoted to business formation, risk management, recordkeeping, go-to-market strategy. Examines how start-up and small/medium-size companies reach the marketplace and sustain their businesses, within highly-competitive industries. Recognition is given to the need of management to operate flexibly in these environments.

ENTSP 611X. Seminar in Entrepreneurship Topics. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F. (Offered in 2022). Seminal readings that canvas the theoretical perspectives and historical roots of entrepreneurship research. A broad variety of core foundational theories, perspectives, and approaches discussed. Topics include the domain of entrepreneurship, foundations and theories of entrepreneurship, the role of opportunities and resources in the entrepreneurial process, the entrepreneur and new venture emergence, cultural and environmental influences on entrepreneurship, family business, corporate entrepreneurship, entrepreneurial orientation, social capital, entrepreneurial learning, and venture financing.

ENTSP 620AX. Special Topics: Strategic Management of Innovation. (3-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Graduate student enrolled in a PhD program. Provide students with a deeper content knowledge of innovation. Analysis of classic and recent readings in Strategic Management of Innovation. Topics include an introduction to the main theories of innovation, technology strategy, types and measurement of innovation, ambidexterity, the influence of strategic leadership on innovation, and innovation challenges in established firms. Multiple levels of analysis and consideration of how these topics emerge across different areas of management (micro and macro) and entrepreneurship research. Theory and empirical research embedded within the applied context of the strategic management innovation field. Emphasis on systematic and scientific approach to deepening our knowledge and understanding of topics.

ENTSP 620BX. Entrepreneur Well-Being. (3-0) Cr. 1. Irr. F. Prereq: Students must be enrolled in a PhD program at Iowa State University. Provides deeper content knowledge of entrepreneur well-being. Covers the broad goals of entrepreneur well-being research and examines differences between two critical types of well-being: hedonic and eudaimonic. Addresses why entrepreneurs can achieve and entrepreneur working environments can produce well-being outcomes distinct from those seen by non-entrepreneurs in more traditional waged work environments. Addresses the different coping behaviors used by entrepreneurs, as well as the complex relationship between well-being and venture performance. Approaches course topics from multiple levels of analysis and considers how these topics emerge across different areas of management (micro and macro) and entrepreneurship research. Emphasis on a systematic and scientific approach to deepening knowledge and understanding of topics.

ENTSP 620DX. Special Topics: Crafting Research Ideas. (Cross-listed with MGMT 620DX). (3-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Graduate student enrolled in a PhD program. Role as a scholar is more than publishing research. The purpose of scholarship is to add to usable knowledge – which means knowledge that can be used to solve real-world problems. To publish an article, students need to convince other scholars of the quality of their research. To create usable knowledge, you need to solve a problem that managers face and communicate that solution to managers. Most managers do not read academic journals, so the publication of an article does not guarantee that anyone who needs the knowledge will find it. Introduction an ideal form of scholarship that Andy Van de Ven calls “engaged scholarship.” This form of scholarship requires the rigorous theory and methods but adds the additional component of connecting research to practitioners throughout the research process.

ENTSP 620EX. Special Topics: Effective Academic Writing. (Cross-listed with MGMT 620EX). (3-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Graduate student enrolled in a PhD program. Provide skills and training necessary to navigate the professional landscape of the management and entrepreneurship fields. Discussion of effective academic writing, focusing on the discipline of management (but certainly applicable beyond this field). Blend of theory, research, and practice focused on understanding one's role as a scholar, the implications of scholarly work, and successful advancement through career stages.

ENTSP 620FX.  Special Topics: Professional Development in Management and Entrepreneurship Research.  (Cross-listed with MGMT 620FX). (3-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F. Prereq: Graduate student enrolled in a PhD program at ISU.  Provides skills and training necessary to navigate the professional landscape of the management/entrepreneurship fields. Includes topics such as research collaborations and networking, the peer review process, ethics, scholarly writing, presenting scholarly work, developing a research identity, understanding the research process, receiving and utilizing feedback, and navigating career milestones. Blend of theory, research, and practice focused on understanding one's role as a scholar, the implications of

ENTSP 620GX. Special Topics: Bayesian Analysis in Management and Entrepreneurship Research. (Cross-listed with MGMT 620GX). (3-0) Cr. 1. Provides a deeper understanding of research methodology. Introduces the fundamental concepts of Bayesian statistics as an advanced methodology to empirically investigate entrepreneurship and management phenomena. Analytical topics include Bayes theorem, prior specification, likelihood functions, Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations, analysis diagnostics, and posterior distributions. Application topics include Bayesian point estimates, intervals, predictions and hypothesis tests. Contrasts Bayesian approaches with frequentist paradigms such as statistical null-hypothesis significance tests. Designed to complement knowledge of MGMT 609 Organizational Research Methods. Focus on exercises and discussions regarding how to collect, analyze and interpret empirical data to develop and advance micro and macro-level theories in management and entrepreneurship.

ENTSP 620HX. Applied Social Network Perspective. (Cross-listed with MGMT 620HX). (3-0) Cr. 1. Prereq: Graduate student enrolled in a PhD program. Provide a deeper content knowledge of social networks in organizational contexts. Cover conceptual foundations of the social network perspective, including how it fundamentally differs from other research perspectives. Explore important implications of various social network attributes and processes in the context of contemporary organizational scholarship. Discuss research design and empirical considerations associated with this perspective. Consider course topics from multiple levels of analysis and consider how these topics emerge across different areas (i.e., micro and macro) of management and entrepreneurship research. Blend of theory and empirical research within the applied context of the management field. Emphasis on a systematic and scientific approach to deepening knowledge and understanding of topics.

ENTSP 620IX. Mergers and Acquisitions. (Cross-listed with MGMT 620IX). (3-0) Cr. 1. Prereq: Graduate student enrolled in a PhD program. Provide a deeper content knowledge of mergers and acquisitions (M&As). Cover various M&A topics (premiums, deal completion, CEO characteristics, post-merger integration, acquisition performance etc.), theoretical frameworks, as well as relevant findings of M&A research. Consider course topics from multiple levels of analysis and consider how these topics emerge across different areas of management (micro and macro) and entrepreneurship research. Blend of theory and empirical research within the applied context of the management field. Emphasis on a systematic and scientific approach to deepening knowledge and understanding of topics.

ENTSP 620JX. Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Big Data in Management and Entrepreneurship Research. (Cross-listed with MGMT 620JX). (3-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. Prereq: Graduate student enrolled in a PhD program. Provide a deeper understanding of research methodology implications of artificial intelligence, machine learning and big data for management and entrepreneurship scholars. Introduce students to the fundamental concepts and emerging capabilities of artificial intelligence and machine learning and investigate their applications in the context of data collection, data analysis and communication of research findings. Explore broader implications of these technologies for the objects of management research: organizations and their members. Designed to complement knowledge students can gain in MGMT 609 Organizational Research Methods and ENTSP/MGMT 620GX Bayesian Analysis in Management and Entrepreneurship Research.

ENV E 120X. Environmental Engineering Learning Community. (1-0) Cr. 1. F. Integration of first-year students into the Environmental Engineering program. Assignments and activities involve personal and leadership skill development, teamwork, academic planning and career readiness. Completed both individually and in learning teams under the direction of instructors and peer mentors.

ENV E 190X. Introduction to Undergraduate Research in Civil and Environmental Engineering. (Cross-listed with C E). Cr. 2. Repeatable. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Introduction to research, focusing on sub-disciplines of civil engineering. Research questions, hypotheses, literature reviews, experimental design, data collection, data analysis, and presentation. Topics chosen to introduce students to water resources, environmental engineering, transportation engineering, geotechnical/materials engineering, or structural engineering.

ENV E 201X. Environmental Engineering Measurements and Analysis. (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: C E 190X. Introduction to environmental monitoring, environmental field and laboratory sampling, sample preservation and chain of custody, quality assurance and quality control, measurements of common chemical and biological components in different media, and analysis of environmental quality in natural and engineered systems. Concentrations and material balances concepts as applied to environmental engineering. Laboratory testing and experiments.

ENV E 426X. Environmental Engineering Science. (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: C E 326, CHEM 231, MICRO 201, ENV E 201 recommended. Physical, chemical and biological principles related to environmental engineering and management. Topics include physical principles (mass transfer, mass balances, reactor systems), chemical principles (kinetics and equilibrium, acid-base, redox and precipitation), and biological principles (common environmental microbial processes, microbiology). Laboratory testing and experiments.

ENV E 427X. Environmental Engineering Systems. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: MATH 265, MATH 266, C E 326, C E 372. Integrated systems and modeling-based evaluation of natural and engineered environments including water, soil, and air. Exploration of public health outcomes and risk assessment in environmental engineering. Analysis of socio-environmental systems.

ENV E 430X. Solid and Hazardous Waste Management. 93-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: C E 326 and credit or enrollment in C E 426. Evaluation, characterization, assessment, planning and design of solid and hazardous waste management systems, regulatory requirements, material characterization and collection, minimization and recycling, energy and materials recovery, composting, off-gas treatment, incineration, stabilization, and landfill design. Design of treatment and disposal systems for solid and hazardous wastes, including physical, chemical, and biological treatment, solidification, incineration, secure landfill design, and final disposal site closure plus restoration.

EVENT 383X. Sports Event Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereqs: AESHM 111 and EVENT 171. Overview of managing sports and recreation facilities and events. Focus on history, conception and design, budgeting, risk management, sponsorship, promotions, logistics, operations, and evaluation.

EVENT 420X. Fairs, Festivals, and Events Management. (Cross-listed with HSP M 420X). (3-0) Cr. 3.  Prereq: HSP M 320 or EVENT 320. Examine current issues within fairs, festivals, and special events. Emphasis placed on the evolution of exhibitions and events to modern day fairs and festivals, along with the processes necessary for operating fairs, festivals, and special events.

EVENT 486X. Advanced Event Production . (0-6) Cr. 3. F. Repeatable. Prereq: EVENT 371, EVENT 485. Permission by instructor . Advanced application event management. Provide leadership and direction for production of an event including vendor and stakeholder relations, budget management, publicity, advertising, choreography, staging, lighting, and food. Maximum of 6 credits may be applied toward graduation.

EVENT 577X. Advanced Social Media Marketing in Event Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Graduate level standing. Project-based course that includes analyzing relevant literature in social media and developing, implementing, and assessing an integrated social media marketing strategy in the event planning business marketing plan. Perspective on digital/social/mobile marketing to appreciate its true value to consumers, to managers, and to other corporate stakeholders.

EVENT 578X. Advanced Event Sustainability Management . (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Graduate level standing. With the ever-growing presence of sustainability and corporate social responsibility (CSR) at the forefront of social and political debate, it can be seen that in addition to providing a platform for social change and education, the role of the event planner is to increasingly embrace and promote sustainable practice.

F

FFP 590X. Family Financial Planning Seminar. (3-0) Cr. 3. SS. Repeatable. Through a seminar format comprised of readings, guest lectures, collaborative case studies, peer interaction, and practical application, students will explore the rapidly growing and changing opportunities of sustainable, responsible, and impact investments.

FIN 334X. Introduction to Financial Technologies and Cryptocurrencies. (3-0). Cr. 3. Prereqs: FIN 301. Introduction to the emerging role of financial technologies and cryptocurrencies in the financial services industry and the impact these technologies are having in areas such as payment systems, financial regulation, crowdfunding, robotic investments, and cyber security. Explore the history and origins of crypto coins, markets for trading cryptocurrencies, and role of digital money as a medium of exchange and financial asset, including valuation, risk, and correlation with other investments.

FIN 426X. Quantitative Investment Analysis. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereqs: FIN 320; STAT 326. Introduction to the use of advanced statistical and machine learning techniques in the practice of portfolio construction. Topics include regularization and tree-based investment techniques, characteristic-based and trend-following investing, and multivariate GARCH analysis. Provides essential analytics training needed for investment management.

FIN 455X. Predictive Analytics in Finance . (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: FIN 301, STAT 326 . Introduction to Financial Analytics concepts and tools. Basic statistical/computing skills, analytical thinking, and business acumen. Develop practical data analytic skills based on building real analytic applications on real data.

FIN 456X. Financial Modeling. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: ACCT 285, FIN 301 and STAT 326. Applying computers to business applications especially using Excel in finance related work.

FIN 492X. Case Studies in Strategic Finanical Decision-Making. (1-0) Cr.1. F. Prereq: FIN 310 and FIN 320. Case based study of situations where companies need to strategically use equity financing. Focus on equity financing decisions at the different phases of a company's lifecycle, from raising private equity, to going public, to making significant acquisitions. Will also consider issues such as investor activism, governance, regulatory and valuation impact. Multiple guest speakers who are actively engaged in private equity and investment banking.

FIN 556X. Advanced Financial Modeling. (3-0). Cr. 3. S. Prereq: FIN 501. Applying computers to business appplication, especially using Excel to solve advanced finance related problems.

FIN 605X. Advanced Regression Analysis for Business PhD Students. (3-0). Cr. 3. Alt. F (offered in 2021). Prereq: Enrollment in the PhD program. Understand how to apply regression analysis, with applications in business research. Focus on applying the theory to analyze data that suffer from problems which make classical Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression inappropriate. Emphasis on analyzing market and firm level data to test hypotheses in business research. Required analysis of business data that are characterized by violations of the ideal conditions behind OLS, including data with autocorrelated or heteroskedastic errors, multicollinearity, endogeneity, qualitative (dummy) variables, seemingly unrelated regressions, and panel data.

FIN 610X. Corporate Finance. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Enrollment in the PhD program. Empirical aspects of corporate finance research as well as the underlying theory. Topics include agency theory, corporate governance, raising capital, capital structure theory and evidence, dividend theory and signaling models, financial distress, and corporate control.

FIN 650X. Seminar in Empirical Finance. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Enrollment in the PhD program. Issues in empirical financial economics including Identification of causal effects, evolution of research streams, development of new research questions, critical usage of archival data and replication of published results.

FRNCH 107X. Intensive Beginning French. (4-0). Cr 4. An accelerated introduction to reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking in French, within the context of Francophone cultures around the world. This course is the equivalent of FRNCH 101 and 102.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

FRNCH 310X. French Pronunciation. (1-0). Cr 1. F.S.SS. Prereq: Credit or concurrent enrollment in FRNCH 202. Practice and theory of correct pronunciation of sounds in French. Correlation between sound and spelling in French. Relationship between pronunciation and grammar.

FRNCH 375X. Francophone Studies in English. (3-0) Cr. 3-4. Repeatable. Prereq: For fourth credit, 6 credits in French at 300 level. Author, genre, period study, or contemporary topics in Francophone history, literature, politics, or culture. Readings, discussions, and papers in English. Required for French concentration credit (4th credit), supplementary readings and written course work in French.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

FRNCH 440X. Seminar in French and/or Francophone Studies. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Prereq: FRNCH 340. Seminar in French and/or Francophone literatures, civilizations. or cultural studies. Topics vary according to faculty interest.

FS HN 220X. American Food and Culture. (3.0) Cr. 3. F. American cuisine reflects the history of the U.S. It is the unique blend of diverse groups of people from around the world, including indigenous Native American Indians, Africans, Asians, Europeans, Pacific Islanders, and South Americans. Explore factors that impact the American Cuisine of today including diverse ethnic and cultural group influences, historical events related to food diversity in the U.S., and agriculture and industrial impacts on food production. Practical knowledge and basic food preparation techniques related to the U.S. food system and trends. Class sessions will include lectures, class discussions and Preview-Reflection Assessments, audio-visual presentations, and Tasting Immersion Activities.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

FS HN 273X. Science and Practice of Brewing. (Cross-listed with M E 273X). (1.5-4.5) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: CHEM 167 or CHEM 177 and PHYS 221 or PHYS 231 or BIOL 211 or BIOL 212; or permission by the instructor; 21 years of age for all students. Introduction to brewing science and technology. Understanding the role of malts, hops, water, and yeast in production of ale and lager beers. Unit operations in brewing. Health, safety, and environmental sustainability in alcohol production and consumption. Weekly laboratory in practical aspects of beer production.

FS HN 301X. Nutrigenomics: From Basic Science to Translational Impact . (2-0) Cr. 1. F.S. 8 week course. Introduction to the concepts of nutrigenomics and how it affects us as producers and consumers of food, as well as the implications for human diseases, including inherited diseases, metabolic disease, cancer, neurodevelopment and neurodegenerative diseases. The potential impact of personalized nutrition on health maintenance and chronic disease prevention, the potential of personalized medicine and full genome sequencing, and the ethical implications of this knowledge. Students will be expected to explore a sub-topic within the context of this course and provide a 2-minute oral presentation.

FS HN 419X. Foodborne Hazards. (Cross-listed with MICRO 419X and TOX 419X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MICRO 201 or MICRO 302, a course in biochemistry. Pathogenesis of human microbiological foodborne infections and intoxications, principles of toxicology, major classes of toxicants in the food supply, governmental regulation of foodborne hazards.

FS HN 445X. Strategies for Personal Food Waste Reduction . (1-0) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: Junior standing or permission of instructor. In-depth analysis and discussion of economic, environmental, social, and ethical implications of food waste. Overview of personal food waste reduction strategies, food recycling/recovery, and responsible waste disposal methods. Discussion and application of advocacy tactics for the promotion of food waste reduction in local communities.

FS HN 562X. Advanced Nutritional Assessment. (4-0) Cr. 4. Prereq: Acceptance in the Master of Professioanl Practice in Dietetics program. Overview and practical applications of methods for assessing nutritional status, including: theoretical framework of nutritional health and disease, dietary intake, biochemical indices, nutrition focused physical exam and body composition across the lifecycle. Activities designed to meet accreditation standards.

FS HN 589X. Systems Neuroscience: Brain, Behavior, and Nutrition-Related Integrative Physiology. (Cross-listed with GERON 589X, NEURO 589X, NUTRS 589X, PSYCH 589X). (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereqs: Graduate standing, or undergraduate with consent of instructor. Structural, functional, and biochemical aspects of brain and non-motor behavior across the human lifespan. Types of neuroimaging used to assess the brain. Current research is leveraged to gauge how nutrition, diseases related to nutrition, and associated physiological processes influence the brain, particularly for common developmental, psychological, and neurological disorders.

FS HN 653X. Food and Agricultural Traceability . (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereqs: Enrollment in The Ivy Executive MBA program within the Ivy College of Business at Iowa State University . Current issues and concepts of food and agricultural product traceability in the U.S., from production to consumption. Food types, microbial agents of concern, adulterants, disease investigations, risk analysis, risk mitigation, prevention and regulatory policy and advocacy. Travel to Washington, D.C.