Experimental Courses 2014-2015, A-H

A B C D E F G H

A B E 273X. CAD for Process Facilities and Land Use Planning (3-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereqs: ENGR 170 or TSM 116 or equivalent. 8-week course. Application of 2-D AutoCAD software to create and interpret 3-D drawings of plant layouts and soil water conservation structures. Use drawings to evaluate options and to create design documentation: stand drawing views, dimension, and notes.

A B E 418X. Fundamentals of Engineering Review. (1-0) Cr. 1. 8 week course. Review of core concepts covered in the Fundamentals of Engineering examination with emphasis on statics, dynamics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, electric circuits, and engineering economics. Open to all College of Engineering seniors, however focus is on the general exam, not discipline specific exams.

A B E 423X. Energy and the Environment. (3-0) Cr. 3. SS. Prereqs: MATH 160 or higher, PHYS 221; A E 216 or M E 231. Overview of energy engineering principles, energy use, and environmental impacts. Fossil fuel energy resources and conversion. Nuclear energy principles, reactors, fuel cycle. Renewable energy systems: solar, wind, water, and biomass conversions. Air, water and land pollution. Energy, global warming, and climate change.

A B E 475X. Design in Animal Production Systems Engineering. (2-0) Cr.2 F. Prereqs: A B E 271 or A B E 272, E M 324. Application of engineering fundamentals to the independent solution of an animal production systems engineering problem with well defined criteria and constraints in either environmental control, structural design, manure management, or air quality/mitigation.

A B E 546X. Introduction Into Bioplastics & Biocomposites. (2-2) Cr.3. S. (Cross-listed with BRT 546X, TSM 546X, M S E 546X). Prereqs: CHEM 163 and MATH 151, or permission of instructor. A study of bio-polymers and related processes used in manufacturing. Lecture and laboratory activities focus on materials, properties, processes, policies and current state of the art of bioplastics.

A ECL 333X. Fisheries Technology (1-3) Cr. 2. F. Prereqs: BIOL 212. Introduction to techniques used in the collection and interpretation of fish population data in the field and in the lab.  Course objectives include an understanding of population survey methodology and improving student critical thinking and teamwork skills. Laboratory focuses on field trips and hands-on sampling experience.  Special course fees.

A M D 329X. Digital Textile Printing for Apparel Design. (2-2) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: A M D 321 and A M D 325. Overview of the use of digital printing in the textile and apparel industry, color matching, repeat print patterns, engineered prints, and creation of apparel prototypes.

ACCT 492X. Accounting and Sustainability. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with BusAd 492X). Critical examination of what information businesses use to make sustainability decisions. Presentations by business professionals will be made on the decision processes surrounding sustainability issues. Students will develop an understanding of what information is needed, what uncertainties companies face, and how to begin to analyze choices related to sustainability.

ACCT 498X. Capstone in Accounting (2-0) Cr. 2. F. Prereqs: ACCT 383, ACCT 384, ACCT 387, and ACCT 485. Integrative studies in accounting. Development of critical thinking, ethical reasoning, professional research and teamwork skills. Written, visual, and oral communication with corporate stakeholders.

ACCT 589X. Corporate Social Responsibility Reporting (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: ACCT 501. Examines the theory and practice of social and environmental reporting, the role of the corporation in society, and the mechanisms by which society might hold corporations accountable for their actions.

ADVRT 499X. Professional Media Internship Cr. 1-3. S.F. Prereqs: C+ or higher in JL MC 201 and ADVRT 301. Faculty adviser approval. Repeatable for up to six credits. Required 400 hour internship at an advertising-related organization. Assessment based on employer evaluations, student evaluation and reports and faculty reviews. For Greenlee School majors. No more that six credits of ADVRT 499, JL MC 499 and P R 499 can be applied toward graduation. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

AER E 463X. Introduction to Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Dual-listed with AER E 563X). Prereq: senior standing in College of Engineering. Introduction to the theory and methods of Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO), including system coupling, system sensitivity methods, decomposition methods, MDO formulations (such as multiple-discipline feasible (MDF), individual discipline feasible (IDF) and all-at-once (AAO) approaches, and MDO search methods.

AER E 468X. Large-Scale Complex Engineered Systems (LSCES). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Dual-listed with AER E 568X) (Cross-listed with IE 468X). Prereqs: senior standing in College of Engineering or permission of AER E 468X instructor. Introduction to the theorectical foundation and methods associated with the design for large-scale complex engineered systems, including objective function formation, design reliability, value-driven design, product robustness, utility theory, economic factors for the formation of a value function and complexity science as a means of detecting unintended consequences in the product behavior.

AER E 483X. Aeroacoustics. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Dual-listed with AER E 583X). Prereqs: AER E 311 or M E 335; and MATH 266 or MATH 267. Noise metrics, Linear wave equation and its solution in 1-, 2-, and 3-D using Green's functions. Propagation of sound in free and confined spaces. Aerodynamic noise sources in engineering machines: aircraft engine noise, airfram noise, wind turbine noise, etc.

AER E 501X. Advanced Engineering Analysis. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Linear ordinary differential equations with variable coefficients; hyperbolic, parabolic, and elliptic equations; tensors.

AER E 511X. Wind Energy System Design (WESD). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with WESEP 511X). Prereq: AERE 310, AERE321, AERE 331 (or equivalent courses) or WESEP 501X. Advanced design, control, and operation of horizontal-axis wind  turbines which include design loads, component design and prediction of its residual life, design of wind farms, electro-mechanical energy conversion systems, optimal control, life-cycle management.

AER E 563X. Introduction to Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Dual-listed with AER E 463X). Prereq: senior standing in College of Engineering. Introduction to the theory and methods of Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO), including system coupling, system sensitivity methods, decomposition methods, MDO formulations (such as multiple-discipline feasible (MDF), individual discipline feasible (IDF) and all-at-once (AAO) approaches, and MDO search methods.

AER E 568X. Large-Scale Complex Engineered Systems (LSCES). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Dual-listed with AER E 468X) (Cross-listed with IE 568X). Prereq: senior standing in College of Engineering or permission of AER E 568X instructor. Introduction to the theorectical foundation and methods associated with the design for large-scale complex engineered systems, including objective function formation, design reliability, value-driven design, product robustness, utility theory, economic factors for the formation of a value function and complexity science as a means of detecting unintended consequences in the product behavior.

AER E 583X. Aeroacoustics. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Dual-listed with AER E 483X). Prereqs: AER E 311 or M E 335; and MATH 266 or MATH 267. Noise metrics, Linear wave equation and its solution in 1-, 2-, and 3-D using Green's functions. Propagation of sound in free and confined spaces. Aerodynamic noise sources in engineering machines: aircraft engine noise, airfram noise, wind turbine noise, etc.

AF AM 310X: Africa to 1880. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with HIST 310X) Survey of the history of African societies, cultures and civilizations from earliest times to 1880. Evolution of states across the continent; social, economic, political, and cultural developments; nature and consequences of African interactions and relationship with Europeans.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

AF AM 311X. Africa Under Colonial Rule. (3-0) Cr. 3 S. (Cross-listed with HIST 311X) Development of Africa from imposition of colonial rule to independence, including processes of European domination, African reaction and resistance, emergence of nationalism, and dismantling of colonialism.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

AGRON 106X. Global Agriculture in a Changing World. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Understanding climate and its effects on global distribution of food and water resources. The nature of climate and its variability in space and time. Use of satellites and related technology to monitor agricultural production, water availability and climate. Influence of climate and climate change on drought famine and other disruptions of essential resources.

AGRON 525X. Crop and Soil Modeling. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: Math 181 or 165 or equivalent, Agron 316 or Agron 354 or equivalent. Understanding basic crop physiology and soil processes through the use of mathematical and statistical approaches. Structure of crop models, dynamics and relationship among components such as leaf-level photosynthesis, canopy architecture, root dynamics and soil carbon and nitrogen pools.

AGRON 528X. Quantitative Genetics for Plant Breeding. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: AGRON 506 and AGRON 513. An introduction to the application of quantitative genetics to plant breeding programs.

AGRON 556X. Agroecosystem Nutrient Cycles. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: 3 credits in chemistry, 6 credits in biology. Recommended: ENSCI 382, 553, EEB 484/584 or upper-level coursework in nutrient cycles. Major, biologically important agroecosystem nutrient cycles as linked to energy (carbon) and water. Effects of agricultural production and management on cycling within systems and transfer among system at local, regional and global scales will be emphasized.

AN S 190X. Livestock Handling, Safety and Welfare. (2-0) Cr. 2. F. Prereqs: AN S 101. Understanding of animal perception to develop best care practices involved in handing of livestock species (beef, sheep, swine, dairy, equine, poultry). Intensive development of skills associated with handling and moving healthy and compromised livestock in respect to human and animal welfare. Integration of scientific and theoretical knowledge of biosecurity and animal-human interactions as it related to livestock handling and movement.

AN S 207X. Art and Heritage of Livestock. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Using art as a venue to understand the legacy and heritage of livestock production and livestock’s contribution to civilization and society; livestock's contributions to warfare, social class, industry, economies, etc.; history of the impact of livestock on painting, poetry, music, sculpture, advertising, pop culture, movies, religion and sports in society.

AN S 260X. Introduction to Controversies in Science and Society. (Same as NREM 260X, FS HN 260X.)  (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Introduction to evaluating controversial and multifaceted issues in natural resource management, animal science, and food science. Critically examine stakeholders’ beliefs, values, and ethics, while determining the credibility of information sources. Case studies and team-based activities.

AN S 280X. Basic Swine Science. (2-0) Cr. 2. F. Prereqs: AN S 101, 114. Basic disciplines and concepts involved in swine production including; industry structure, trends and statistics; production phases and buildings; genetic improvement; reproduction; nutrition; health and biosecurity; nutrient management; marketing and meat quality and career opportunities in the swine industry. Only AnS 280X and AnS 280LX or AnS 225 may count toward graduation.

AN S 310X. Advanced Career Preparation in Animal Science (1-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereqs: AN S 210. 8-week course. Awareness and development of soft skills and critical thinking skills. Assist students in specific career paths and goals pertaining to the field of veterinary medicine, graduate education, or employment after graduation. Only one credit of AN S 310A, 310B, 310C may be applied toward graduation. Offered Satisfactory-Fail only. Special course fee.
A. Veterinary Medicine
B. Graduate School
C. Industry

AN S 324X. Food Processing for Companion Animals. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: AnS 270 and AnS 319; Junior classification. Food processing and nutrition for carnivorous companion animals. Topics covered include meat processing and meat preservation for companion animal diets, regulatory standards, cutting edge technologies for processing meat for companion animals, dietary needs of carnivorous companion animals, effect of different processing methods on safety and nutrient bioavailability.

AN S 382X. Swine Environment Management. (1-0) Cr. 1. F. Prereqs: 225 or 280X and 280L. Recommended TSM210. Response of swine to thermal environment, ventilation system design and analysis, heating and cooling systems, and examples of various designs for all phases of production. Troubleshooting ventilation systems and energy analysis of production units.

AN S 384X. Swine Health and Biosecurity. (1-0) Cr. 1. F. Prereqs: 225 or 280X and 280L. Recommended a course in microbiology. Overview of standard biosecurity protocols and identification of behavior and clinical signs of illness in pigs. Treatment administration and prevention methods. Introduction to immune system function and basic swine disease transmission.

AN S 441X. International Animal Agriculture. (3-0) Cr. 3. (Cross-listed with GLOBE 441X). Prereq: Two courses from AN S 223, AN S 225, AN S 226, AN S 229, AN S 235. An overview of animal agriculture with emphasis on animal agriculture in developing countries. Historical, economic, environmental; and political considerations will be assessed and evaluated. Issues related to gender, resilience and sustainability for different production systems will be investigated.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

AN S 569X. Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology. Cr. 2. F. Same as TOX 569X. Prereqs: BBMD 301, Biology 258 or An S 331. Chemical agents that target developmental and reproductive systems in animals and humans, both male and female. The influence that timeline of developmental in utero and what part of reproductive organ have on outcome of environmental exposures will be developed. The physiological changes due to exposure, and mechanistic pathways activated by xenobiotics will be defined and the consequences of these changes will be explored.

ARABC 202X. Intermediate Arabic II. (4-0) Cr. 4. F. Prereq: 201X. Continuation of Arabic 201X. Intermediate development of reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking skills in Modern Standard Arabic within the context of the Arabic world.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

ARCH 323X. Theories of Architecture. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: ARCH 221, ARCH 222.  Survey of theories impacting the production of architecture, historically and in contemporary practice. Emphasis will be given to recent movements and architectural manifestations, as well as close examinations of socio-cultural conditions.

ARCH 521X. Celluloid Cities: Urbanism in Film. (1-2) Cr. 3. F. Examines the urban condition as it is revealed in film. Lectures will introduce and offer a social and art historical context for each showing, as well as introduce the primary urban strategies evoked. Students will be required to complete as a term project the creation of a 5-minute film regarding urban instances.

ARCH 525X. Meaning and Form in Architecture. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Junior, senior or graduate standing. Can architecture mean anything? How can architecture represent anything beyond mere physical description in a way portrait represents an individual? This seminar focuses on critical analysis of meaning and form in architecture and human-made environment in various cultural contexts examined from historical and theoretical perspectives. Topics may include investigations of form as a discursive mean and expand upon questions beyond representational, to include questions about dynamics of architectural form, type and archetype in architecture, the quests for the essence of architecture and its relation to various forms of micro-architecture (such as wall, column, canopy and various “huts”), formal and philosophical architectural “taxonomy,” and related theoretical constructs of meaning and form in architecture (such as framing, performativity, rhetorics).

ARCH 573X. Theories of Architecture. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Cross-listed with C R P. Prereq: senior or graduate standing.  Investigation of broader social and economic processes around the globe from the housing perspective. Case study approach to shelter struggles and the various policy and design responses related to them, as a means of understanding a range of issues important to urban systems including poverty, development, urbanization, migration, social movements and citizenship.

ARTED 209X. Methods of Teaching in and Though Art. Cr. 2. F. Prereq: Sophomore level. Methods of teaching in and through visual art are experienced and applied in this course.  Art-centered and interdisciplinary art education methods for K-8 teaching are designed to develop creativity, authentic expression, collaboration, esthetic sensitivity and pluralistic, global perspectives. Special course fees.

ARTGR 463X. 3D Motion Graphics. Cr. 3. SS. (Dual-listed with ARTGR 563X). Prereqs: Concurrent enrollment in ARTGR 370, ARTGR 371, or ARTGR 470. 3D visualization in a Motion Graphics context. Emphasis on design in 3D computer animation as it relates to various electronic media.

ARTGR 464X. Digital Imaging. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Dual-listed with ARTGR 564X). Prereqs: Concurrent enrollment in ARTGR 370, ARTGR 371 or ARTGR 470. This studio course will cover experimental techniques using the digital drawing tablet combined with manual drawing mediums, exploring the digital tablet, scanner, and camera as ways to collect and make images, conceptual and compositional development of digital techniques and software, and connecting digital techniques to visual processes and ideation. Students will have a better understanding of different ways of working digitally while exploring image-making processes.

ARTGR 453X. 3D Motion Graphics. Cr. 3. SS. (Dual-listed with ARTGR 463X). Prereqs: Concurrent enrollment in ARTGR 370, ARTGR 371, or ARTGR 470. 3D visualization in a Motion Graphics context. Emphasis on design in 3D computer animation as it relates to various electronic media.

ARTGR 564X. Digital Imaging. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Dual-listed with ARTGR 464X). Prereqs? Concurrent enrollment in ARTGR 370, ARTGR 371 or ARTGR 470. This studio course will cover experimental techniques using the digital drawing tablet combined with manual drawing mediums, exploring the digital tablet, scanner, and camera as ways to collect and make images, conceptual and compositional development of digital techniques and software, and connecting digital techniques to visual processes and ideation. Students will have a better understanding of different ways of working digitally while exploring image-making processes.

ARTIS 331X. Alternative Materials for the Artist/Designer. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: 200-level studio courses, or permission of instructor. Exploration of alternative materials (primarily non-metallics, both natural and manufactured) applicable to the design and creation of small designed objects and adornment. Students will learn additive and reductive processes, experiment with found object inclusion, rubber mold-making, and resin casting. A series of finished pieces will result.

ARTIS 355X. Relief Printmaking: Digital/Traditional. Cr. 3. F. (Dual-listed with ArtIS 555X). Prereqs: Graduate Classification and permission of instructor. In-depth exploration of digital or traditional design and bock cutting processes (computer/laser cutter/CNC router or drawing/chisels). Use relief printmaking to create a unified body of prints from those blocks. Emphasis is on experimental and creative use of printmaking with sudy of contemporary trends.

ARTIS 362X. Artists, Designers and Sustainable Development. (0-6) Cr. 3.  S. Prereqs: Junior level standing in the College of Design or University. The artist/designer’s role in sustainable development with a focus on cultural understanding of the collaborating communities.  Class discussion, visual exercises, and the creation of creative collaborative service-learning projects such as product design, habitat design, and visual arts projects. Pre-orientation for travel to Ghana in ARTIS 363X. Special course fees.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

ARTIS 375X. Introduction to Interactive Art (0-6) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: ARTIS 212 or permission of instructor. Introduction to the tools required to create interactive artworks and kinetic sculptures. Students will learn how to build simple mechanical artworks and control those artworks with custom fabricated electronics. Students will use CNC routers, laser cutters and other computer assisted equipment to create their projects.

ARTIS 491X. Post Baccalaureate Capstone Course. Cr. 1. F.S. Prereq: Enrollment in Post Baccalaureate Program. Exhibition of artwork completed in the Post Baccalaureate program, required for fulfillment of certificate. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

ARTIS 555X. Relief Printmaking: Digital/Traditional. Cr. 3. F. (Dual-listed with ArtIS 355X). Prereqs: Graduate Classification and permission of instructor. In-depth exploration of digital or traditional design and bock cutting processes (computer/laser cutter/CNC router or drawing/chisels). Use relief printmaking to create a unified body of prints from those blocks. Emphasis is on experimental and creative use of printmaking with study of contemporary trends.

ASL 305X. ASL Classifiers and Depiction. Cr. 3. S. Prereq: ASL 205. Focused analysis, documentation, discussion, and increased development of classifiers and depiction in ASL. Investigation in how these grammatical features are deliberately incorporated into conversational, presentational, scientific, and artistic language production.


B

B M S 447X. Principles of Anatomy. (2-6) Cr. 4. F. (Dual-listed with B M S 547X). Prereq: Instructor permission required for undergraduate students. Examination of gross anatomy and neuroanatomy of human, dog, and laboratory animals. Laboratories will include cadaveric dissection of canine and rodents, virtual dissection of human specimens, case studies and problem based learning. 2 one-hour lectures/week, 2 two-hour labs/week. Special course fee.

B M S 502X. Methods in Biomedical Sciences. (0-9) Cr. 3. S.  Provides laboratory experience in the application of methods in biomedical sciences, including animal physiology and pharmacology laboratory techniques; human physiology recordings and urinalysis; pharmacokinetics; basic techniques in analytical laboratory; basic pathology, immunology, bacteriology, and virology laboratory techniques. Special course fee.

B M S 538X. Principles of Physiology. (4-0) Cr. 4. F. Principles of neurophysiology, endocrine and reproductive physiology, muscle physiology, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, and digestive physiology, and regulation of body fluid.

B M S 539X. Principles of Pharmacology. (4-0) Cr. 4. S. General principles of drug actions; drug disposition; drug acting or, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal, and endocrine systems; anti-inflammatory and antibiotic drug; anti-cancer drugs; anesthetics CNS stimulants; lifestyle drugs; drug addiction, abuse and dependence; drugs in sport; drugs for obesity; biopharmaceuticals and gene therapy; drug development.

B M S 547X. Principles of Anatomy. (2-6) Cr. 4. F. (Dual-listed with B M S 447X) Prereq: Instructor permission required for undergraduate students. Examination of gross anatomy and neuroanatomy of human, dog, and laboratory animals. Laboratories will include cadaveric dissection of canine and rodents, virtual dissection of human specimens, case studies and problem based learning. 2 one-hour lectures/week, 2 two-hour labs/week. Special course fee.

BBMB 120X. The Biochemistry of Beer. (2-0) Cr. 2. F. An introduction to the major classes of biomolecules, basic biochemical concepts, enzymology, metabolism and the genetic engineering as they apply to the production and flavor of beer. All aspects of biochemistry of beer will be covered, including the malting of barley, starch conversion, yeast fermentation, and the chemical changes that occur during the aging of beer. Intended for nonmajors. Natural science majors limited to elective credit only.

BBMB 504X. Amino Acids and Proteins. (2-0) Cr.2 F. Prereqs: CHEM 332 or equivalent. Review of amino acids and proteins, including atomic interactions, thermodynamics, structure and properties of amino acids, post-translational modifications, protein expression, purification and analysis, protein secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure, protein folding, oxygen transport and hemoglobin, models for equilibrium binding, elementary reactions and enzyme kinetics, biosynthesis of amino acids: pathways and mechanisms.

BIOE 208X. Introduction to Bioinstrumentation. (Cross-listed with E E). (2-3) Cr. 3. F.SS. Prereqs: MATH 165. Fundamental, laboratory intensive course in bio-instrumentation with an emphasis on acquiring and analyzing biomedical signals to obtain relevant information. Topics covered include an overview of basic medical measurement systems, labs illustrating data acquisition from different body systems, and an introduction to statistical analysis and its relationship to biological variability.

BIOL 202X. Exploration of Environmental Issues. (Cross-listed with ENV S, ENSCI). (1-0). Cr. 1. F. Prereqs: Concurrent enrollment in ENSCI 201. Exploration of specific environmental and sustainability issues; designed to complement ENSCI 201. Topics may vary in different years. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

BIOL 349X. The Genome Perspective in Biology. (Cross-listed with GEN, MICRO, V PTH). (2-0). Cr. 2. F. Prereqs: GEN 313 OR GEN 320. How genome, RNA, and protein data are analyzed using computer technology to answer biological questions on topics ranging from microbial diversity to human health. An introduction for students in the life sciences to the fields of genomics, bioinformatics and systems.

BIOL 370X. GIS for Ecology and Environmental Science.Cr. Var. 1-6. F. (Same as ENSCI 370X.Prereq: Six credits in biological and /or physical sciences, and permission of instructor. Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) with emphasis on ecological and environmental applications. No prior GIS experience required. Guided, individualized study of topics based on student background and interest. For students with prior experience, topics and activities are selected to build upon any previous experience and minimize duplication to previous GIS coursework. Potential topics include: basic concepts of GIS, data structures, database management, spatial analysis, modeling and visualization of ecological and environmental data. Case studies in ecological and environmental applications using ArcGIS. May be taken more than once for credit. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis.

BRT 513X. Biorenewables Supply Chain Management.  Cr.3. S. (Cross-listed with SCM 513X). Prereqs: Graduate standing or qualified undergraduates with instructor permission. Evaluation of supply chain logistics related the field of biorenewables. The unique challenges associated with biorenewables supply chain are emphasized and examined: cost analysis, market demand & prices, life cycle analysis, environmental impacts, as well as, the technological, social, and political factors related to society.

BRT 516X. International Biorenewables Law & Policy. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Same as POL S  516X). Evaluation of the international biorenewables field as it relates to the areas of law and policy. Primary emphasis on the following topics: concerns that motivated the development and expansion of the field by adopting countries, a history of the interactions between biorenewable pathways. Law and policy in adopting countries and international controversies that have arisen from these interactions and their effects.

BRT 546X. Introduction Into Bioplastics & Biocomposites. (2-2) Cr.3. S. (Cross-listed with A B E 546X, TSM 546X, M S E 546X). Prereqs: CHEM 163 and MATH 151, or permission of instructor. A study of bio-polymers and related processes used in manufacturing. Lecture and laboratory activities focus on materials, properties, processes, policies and current state of the art of bioplastics.

BRT 592L. Biorenewables Laboratory. (0-3) Cr. 1. An introduction to hands-on experimental laboratory techniques including laboratory safety, calibration, proper usage of chemistry apparatus, chemicals, analytical equipment, and fundamental techniques to ensure successful research.

BSE 208X. Introduction to Bioinstrumentation. (Cross-listed with E E 208X). (2-3) Cr. 3. F.SS. Prereqs: MATH 165. Fundamental, laboratory intensive course in bio-instrumentation with an emphasis on acquiring and analyzing biomedical signals to obtain relevant information. Topics covered include an overview of basic medical measurement systems, labs illustrating data acquisition from different body systems, and an introduction to statistical analysis and its relationship to biological variability.

BUSAD 103X. Orientation. (1-0) Cr. 1. F,S. A required orientation for all College of Business students. Review of college and university requirements, transfer credits, academic planning, university policies and deadlines, and registration procedures. Includes group advising for course selection and registration. Only one of BUSAD 101, 102 or 103 maybe counted towards graduation.

BUSAD 203X. Business Careers and Employment Preparation. (1-0) Cr. 1. Prereq: BUSAD 101 or 102. Careers in business and issues relevant to the workplace. Discussion of diversity and ethics issues in the workplace. Developing and implementing a professional job search, functioning professionally in the workplace setting, resume and professional correspondence, interviewing, evaluating offers, business etiquette, networking and transitioning from student to employee.

BusAd 492X. Accounting and Sustainability. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with ACCT 492X). Critical examination of what information businesses use to make sustainability decisions. Presentations by business professionals will be made on the decision processes surrounding sustainability issues. Students will develop an understanding of what information is needed, what uncertainties companies face, and how to begin to analyze choices related to sustainability.

BUSAD 590X Special Topics in Business. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Enrollment in MBA program or departmental permission. A special topics course covering contemporary issues in business. Topics vary by semester. May be taken more than once for credit.

BUSAD 644X. Business Research Methods. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. A survey of the wide variety of research methods used in business. Methods will be presented and discussed with emphasis on applicability in differnet research situations.


C

C E 449X. Structural Health Monitoring. (Cross-listed with MAT E, M S E). (Dual-listed with C E 549X). (3-0). Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: Permission of instructor. Introductory and advanced topics in structural health monitoring (SHM) of aeronautical, civil, and mechanical systems. Seminar main topics include SHM: sensors, signal processing, data acquisition and transmission systems and design of integrated SHM solutions. Subject matter includes nondestructive evaluation techniques, accelerometers, strain gauges, signal processing in time and frequency domains, feature extraction methods, and cutting edge research in SHM. Team projects in health monitoring solution design.

C E 549X. Structural Health Monitoring. (Cross-listed with MAT E, M S E). (Dual-listed with C E 549X). (3-0). Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: Permission of instructor. Introductory and advanced topics in structural health monitoring (SHM) of aeronautical, civil, and mechanical systems. Seminar main topics include SHM: sensors, signal processing, data acquisition and transmission systems and design of integrated SHM solutions. Subject matter includes nondestructive evaluation techniques, accelerometers, strain gauges, signal processing in time and frequency domains, feature extraction methods, and cutting edge research in SHM. Team projects in health monitoring solution design.

C I 422X. Teaching and Learning Iowa History. (30-15) Cr. 3. SS. (Dual-listed with 522X) Multicultural and social justice focus on Iowa history; different theme each summer. Effective pedagogical and assessment strategies for integrating these themes into K-12 curriculum.

C I 522X. Teaching and Learning Iowa History. (30-15) Cr. 3. SS. (Dual-listed with 422X) Multicultural and social justice focus on Iowa history; different theme each summer. Effective pedagogical and assessment strategies for integrating these themes into K-12 curriculum.

C I 534X. Applied Measurement in Experimental Psychology (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: STAT 401 or RESEV 542. Applied psychology and educational measurement. Measurement and psychometric theory. Focus on reliability and various forms of validity. Test and scale construction strategies. Strategies for investigating individual differences within the context of educational assessment.

C I 558X. Theory and Review of Research on Reading Comprehension. (3-0). Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Graduate standing. Critical examination of the topics central to the study of reading comprehension, including processes, development, contexts, motivation, teaching and learning, and assessment. Reading and discussion of research literature in reading comprehension and comprehension instruction.

C R P 335X. Study Abroad Options. (3-0). Cr. 3 S. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits. Special topics in the theory and practice of urban planning. Travel to relevant countries. General cultural and historical studies, topical projects and individual inquiry. Courses may be taught by departmental faculty or faculty from approved Iowa State Study Abroad programs. See current offerings for detailed syllabus.

C R P 427X. Comparative Ubranism and Urban Studies. (3-0). Cr. 3. F. Focus on collaborative learning of urbanism and urban studies among students at Iowa State University and thier counterparts in foreign universities, including Tongji University in China. Videoconferences will be held for students and faculty members across countries to share course materials, class lectures and to discuss selected topics of mutual interest.

C R P 454X. Fundamentals of Remote Sensing. (3-0). Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with L A, NREM). (Dual-listed with CRP 554X). Introduction to remote sensing techniques needed for basic analysis of satellite images, including: filtering and conflation techniques, stacking, pan sharpening, image rectification, image enhancement, unsupervised and supervised classification. Practical applications in a variety of topics to understand how to interpret images.

C R P 457X. GeoGames for Civic Engagement. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Explore design and implementation of participatory geospatial games; define GeoGames; work on common goals in interdisciplinary teams; distinguish among different types of GeoGames; designing GeoGames for civic engagement, community visioning, and community planning.

C R P 458X. Web Mapping/GIS. (2-2). Cr. 3. (Dual-listed with C R P 558X). (Same as L A 458X/558X). Prereq: CRP 451/551, LA 302, GEOL 452/552 or instructor permission. Use and development of online mapping tools to support participatory GIS, Volunteered Geographic Information, information sharing, geodesign and decision making actions. Geoprocessing and Web Scripting/coding and user interface design. Laboratory emphasis practical applications and uses of Web GIS.

C R P 460X. Social Justice and Planning. (3-0). Cr. 3. F. (Dual-listed with C R P 560X). Investigation of the topic of social justice as it relates to the challenge of planning more socially just urban societies, emphasizing the importance of social justice issues to planning in a globalized world. Includes a range of issues and case studies of local social justice initiatives, both US and global. Students will complete individual service learning projects as part of the course requirements.

C R P 471X. Real Estate Development. (3-0). Cr. 3. S. Introduction to real estate issues related to planning, design, and development. Cases exploring the property development process, including residential, office, retail, hotel, and mixed-use. Examines how location decisions are made and property values are created. Focuses on urban, suburban, and rural redevelopment opportunities.

C R P 479X. Public Finance and Planning. (3-0). Cr. 3. F. (Dual-listed with C R P 579X). Effective management of state and local government finance critical to successful community and regional planning. Economic concepts, topics in budgeting, revenue, expenditure, and financing, analytical techniques, economic impact, and case studies. Understanding of economic assessment in planning and understanding of various linkages between planning and public finance.

C R P 513X. Food and Community. (3-0). Cr. 3. F. Examination of the role that planners have in shaping a community's food system, including the production, distribution and consumption of food. The course will analyze the food system from a planner's perspective through eight modules focusing on multiple elements of the food system.

C R P 521X. Historic Preservation Planning: Theory and Practice. (3-0). Cr. 3. S. Introduction to the history, theory, and practice of historic preservation and cultural resource management. Cases exploring preservation in US and global contexts; politics of preservation; preservation technologies; and relationship of preservation to other community issues.

C R P 554X. Fundamentals of Remote Sensing. (3-0). Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with L A, NREM). (Dual-listed with CRP 454X). Introduction to remote sensing techniques needed for basic analysis of satellite images, including: filtering and conflation techniques, stacking, pan sharpening, image rectification, image enhancement, unsupervised and supervised classification. Practical applications in a variety of topics to understand how to interpret images.

C R P 558X. Web Mapping/GIS. (2-2) Cr. 3. (Dual-listed with C R P 458X). (Same as L A 458X/558X). Prereq: CRP 451/551, LA 302, GEOL 452/552 or instructor permission. Use and development of online mapping tools to support participatory GIS, Volunteered Geographic Information, information sharing, geodesign and decision making actions. Geoprocessing and Web Scripting/coding and user interface design. Laboratory emphasis practical applications and uses of Web GIS.

C R P 560X. Social Justice and Planning. (3-0). Cr. 3. F. (Dual-listed with C R P 460X). Investigation of the topic of social justice as it relates to the challenge of planning more socially just urban societies, emphasizing the importance of social justice issues to planning in a globalized world. Includes a range of issues and case studies of local social justice initiatives, both US and global. Students will complete individual service learning projects as part of the course requirements.

C R P 573X. Theories of Architecture. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Cross-listed with ARCH. Prereq: senior or graduate standing.  Investigation of broader social and economic processes around the globe from the housing perspective. Case study approach to shelter struggles and the various policy and design responses related to them, as a means of understanding a range of issues important to urban systems including poverty, development, urbanization, migration, social movements and citizenship.

C R P 579X. Public Finance and Planning. (3-0). Cr. 3. F. (Dual-listed with C R P 479X). Effective management of state and local government finance critical to successful community and regional planning. Economic concepts, topics in budgeting, revenue, expenditure, and financing, analytical techniques, economic impact, and case studies. Understanding of economic assessment in planning and understanding of various linkages between planning and public finance.

CDMIS 480X. Topics in Communication Disorders. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Same as LING 480X).  Prereqs: CMDIS/LING 275, CMDIS/LING 371, and BIOL 255; permission of instructor. Guided examination of topics in preparation for graduate work in Speech-Language Pathology or Audiology. Primary course delivery by WWW.

A. Anatomy and physiology of speech and hearing
B. Articulation and phonological disorders
C. Evaluation and diagnosis of communication disorders

CJ ST 339X. Liberty and Law in America. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with PHIL 339X and POL S 339X). Prereq: sophomore status. An exploration of competing conceptions of liberty in American political thought and debats about how liberty should be protected by the law. Contemporary debates about topics such as health care, drugs, property, speech, religion, and sex.

CL PS 122X. Leadership with Purpose. (1-0) Cr. 1. F.S. Designed for emerging student leaders who are ready to explore their purpose, this course will provide students with basic leadership skills covering strengths identification, personal skill development, goal achievement, values-based behaviors, and mission statement development.

CL PS 270X. Campus Leadership Development. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.  Effective leadership practices and information on engagement opportunities and resources on campus for student leaders. Expectation of engagement in campus activities.

CL PS 422X : Leadership Capstone Seminar: Theory to Practice (3-0) Cr. 3. S.F. Prerequisite: CL PS 322. Critical analysis of leadership theory to inform practice with emphasis on ethical leadership and the alignment of personal and organizational values.

COM S 105X. Computer Programming Short Course. (2-0) Cr. 2. F.S. Prereqs: COM S 104 or equivalent or advance programming course. Short course in programming using a current programming language. Course includes instruction in syntax and semantics of a current programming language.

A. Computer Programming Short Course: Perl.
B. Computer Programming Short Course: MATLAB.

COM S 106X. Introduction to Web Programming. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Introduction to Web programming basics. Fundamentals of developing Web pages using a comprehensive Web development life cycle. In-depth experience with current Web design techniques such as MTML5 and cascading style sheets. Programming strategies for accessibility, usability and search engine optimization.

COM S 113X. Introduction to spreadsheets and databases. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Using Microsoft Excel spreadsheets and Microsoft Access databases to input, store, process, manipulate, query, and analyze data for business and industrial applications. Only one of COM S 102, 103 and 113X can be counted for credit. Credit cannot be applied to Com S, S E, and CPR E majors.

COM S 424X. Introduction to High Performance Computing. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S. (Same as CPR E, MATH). Prereq: MATH 265; 207 or 317. Numerical serial and parallel computing using the Message Passing Interface. Oral and written semester project.

COM S 435X. Algorithms for Large Data Sets: Theory and Practice. (3-0) Cr. 3. (Dual-listed with COM S 535X.) Prereq: COM S 228, COM S 330 or CPRE 310 or COM S 311 or equivalent. Challenges involved in solving computational problems on massive data sets. Discussion of computational problems that arise in the context of web search, social network analysis, recommendation systems, and online advertising etc. Theoretical aspects include modeling the computational problems using graphs, study of similarity measures and hash functions, and design of efficient algorithms for graphs. Practical aspects include implementation and performance evaluation of the algorithms on real world data sets. Graduate credit requires a written report on current research.

COM S 535X. Algorithms for Large Data Sets: Theory and Practice. (3-0) Cr. 3. (Dual-listed with COM S 435X.) Prereq: COM S 228, COM S 330 or CPRE 310 or COM S 311 or equivalent. Challenges involved in solving computational problems on massive data sets. Discussion of computational problems that arise in the context of web search, social network analysis, recommendation systems, and online advertising etc. Theoretical aspects include modeling the computational problems using graphs, study of similarity measures and hash functions, and design of efficient algorithms for graphs. Practical aspects include implementation and performance evaluation of the algorithms on real world data sets. Graduate credit requires a written report on current research.

COMST 104X. Orientation to Communication Studies. (1-0). Cr. 1. F. Prereq: Available only for Communication Studies majors. Orientation to Communication Studies discipline, program requirements and career opportunities. Required of communication studies majors. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

COMST 210X. Communication and U.S. Diversity. (3-0) Cr. 3 SS. Introduction to the role of diversity in communication. Developing competent communication with diverse social groups within interpersonal and organizational contexts in the United States. Topics may include structured reflection of one’s role in diverse communication experiences, cultural variations in communication mores, impacts of racial/ethnic/gender identities on communication, workplace policies regarding cultural diversity, the intersection of communication and cultural privilege, communication practices that can reduce prejudice/discrimination, and communication characteristics of advocates for diversity.
Meets U. S. Diversity Requirement.

CPR E 276X. Mobile Android Development Laboratory. (0-2) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: CPRE 288. This course covers the laboratory exercises for embedded mobile systems development with Android ADK. It will motivate basic Android app development followed by practices for developing hardware accessories to interface with Android.

CPR E 332X. Cyber Defense Competition. (1-0). Cr. 1. F. S/F. (Cross-listed wtih INFAS 332X). Repeatable. Participation in cyber defense competition. Scenario based computer system setup, risk assessment and design of security systems. Defense of computer and network systems against trained attackers. Team based. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

CPR E 424X. Introduction to High Performance Computing. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S. (Same as COM S, MATH). Prereq: MATH 265; 207 or 317. Numerical serial and parallel computing using the Message Passing Interface. Oral and written semester project.

CPR E 539X. Cyber Physical System Security for the Smart Grid. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with  INFAS 539X). Prereqs: CPR E 489 or CPR E 530 or EE 303. Introduction to cyber security, cyber physical system (CPS), and smart grid automation technologies; supervisor control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems; cyber risk modeling, vulnerability analysis, impact analysis, defense and mitigation techniques; cyber security of wide-area monitoring, protection, and control (WAMPAC); security and privacy in advanced metering infrastructure (AMI), cyber security compliance and industry best practices, CPS security test-beds and attack-defense hands-on laboratory experiments.


D

DES 211X. The Art of Materials and Processes. (3-0). Cr. 3. F. Introduction to four materials areas: woods, metals, fibers, and ceramics. Technical skills, processes, and application in these areas as with an emphasis on the artist's approach.

DES 259X. Design Field Study. Cr. R. Repeatable. Prereq: Enrollment in or 2 credits of Des 240.
Off-campus tours of areas of interest within the design professions such as design offices, museums, buildings, and neighborhoods. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only. Offered on a satisfactory fail basis only.

DES 332X. Multi-Dimensional Digital Design Communication. (3-1.5). Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: ARCH 230, ARTGR 275, DSN S 232, or permission of instructor. Investigations of interoperable digital-design tools, technics and methods directed at human scale interactive hybrid design from ideation to visualization, synthesis to analysis, and realization to fabrication.

DIET 571X. Leadership in Dietetics. (3-0) Cr. 3. SS. This course builds upon leadership theories to develop the fundamental concepts and skills to bridge the gap between theory and practice. Students will be able to successfully evaluate classic and contemporary leadership theories, investigate current leadership trends and identify positive applications in the dietetics community.

DIET 574X. Nutrition and Immunology. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Principles and issues related to nutrition and immunology. Impact of nutrients and nutritional status on immune responses. Impact of disease states on nutritional status.

DIET 598X. Clinical Aspects of Nutrition Support. (3-0) Cr. 3 S. Prereq: Enrollment in GPIDEA - Dietetics program. Specialized nutrition assessment and support. Review of energy expenditure and substrate utilization in specific disease states. Current Methods for the initiation and management of enteral and parenteral nutrition therapy including access, metabolic and mechanical complications. Evaluation of nutrition support methodology in selected disease states.

DSN S 332X. Multi-Dimensional Digital Design Communication. (3-0). Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: ARCH 230, ARTGR 275, DSN S 232, or permission of instructor. Investigations of interoperable digital design tools, technics and methods directed at human scale interactive hybrid design from ideation to visualization, synthesis to analysis, and realization to fabrication.

DSN S 391X. Predicting Trends & Consumer Desire in Design. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. The role of social, economic, technological, and lifestyle influences in creating design trends. An understanding of the synergistic relationship between user needs, moods, desires and the design process helps designers forecast trends and increase value, without adding cost. Students will attempt to create a trend and learn to produce a forcasting trend board and book.


E

E E 208X. Introduction to Bioinstrumentation. (Cross-listed with BSE 208X). (2-3) Cr. 3. F.SS. Prereqs: MATH 165. Fundamental, laboratory intensive course in bio-instrumentation with an emphasis on acquiring and analyzing biomedical signals to obtain relevant information. Topics covered include an overview of basic medical measurement systems, labs illustrating data acquisition from different body systems, and an introduction to statistical analysis and its relationship to biological variability.

E E 489X. Survey of Remote Sensing Technologies (Same as GEOL 489X, NREM 489X, MTEOR 489X) (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: Four courses in physical or biological sciences or engineering. Electromagnetic radiation principles, active and passive sensors, multispectral and hyperspectral sensors, imaging radar, SAR, thermal imaging, lidar. Examples of applications.

E E 489L. Satellite Remote Sesing Laboratory (Same as GEOL 489L, NREM 489L, MTEOR489L) (0-3) Cr. 1. S. Prereqs: Completion or concurrent enrollment in E E 489X). Processing and analysis of satellite sensor data (optical and radar). Provides practical applications in an environmental context.

E E 589X. Survey of Remote Sensing Technologies (Same as GEOL 589X, NREM 589X, MTEOR 589X) (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: Four courses in physical or biological sciences or engineering. Electromagnetic radiation principles, active and passive sensors, multispectral and hyperspectral sensors, imaging radar, SAR, thermal imaging, lidar. Examples of applications.

E M 567X. Continuum Mechanochemistry. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: E M 566 or consent of instructor. Continuum mechanical, thermomechanical, and kinetic fundamentals of the effect of stresses and strains on chemical reactions, phase transformations, diffusion, and compositional changes. Mechanochemical phenomena. Large strain formulation. High pressure mechanochemistry; multiscale approach. Mechanics of oxidation. Lithiation and elithiation of silicon electrodes. Nanovoid formation due to Kirkendall effect.

E M 571X. Mechanics of Interface and Surface-Induced Phenomena. (2-1) Cr. 3. Prereq: EM 566. Phase and twin interfaces, grain boundaries. Thermodynamics of sharp interfaces. Finite-width interfaces: phase field approach. Gibbs dividing surface. Interface stresses, energy, width, and mobility. Surface-induced melting and solid-solid transformations. Intermediate phases within solid-solid interface. Virtual melting much below melting temperature as mechanism of solid-solid transformations and plasticity.

ECON 292A. Career Seminar: Agricultural Business. (1-0) Cr. 1. Prereq: Classification in economics or agricultural business. Career opportunities in the various industries and government institutions. Required training and skills needed to perform successfully in different types of careers. Factors important in finding and obtaining employment either before or after graduation including personal resumes, interviewing, and letter writing. Graduation Restriction: Only one of ECON 292A and ECON 292B may count toward graduation.

ECON 292B. Career Seminar: Economics and Business Economics. (1-0) Cr. 1. Prereq: Classification in economics or agricultural business. Career opportunities in the various industries and government institutions. Required training and skills needed to perform successfully in different types of careers. Factors important in finding and obtaining employment either before or after graduation including personal resumes, interviewing, and letter writing. Graduation Restriction: Only one of ECON 292A and ECON 292B may count toward graduation.

ECON 495X. Economics Domestic Travel Course. Cr. 1-3. Prereq: sophomore status. Permission of instructor. Tour and study of domestic businesses, markets, and economic institutions located outside Iowa to expose students to the diversity of activities within the U.S. economy. Pre-trip sessions arranged. Locations and duration of tours will vary.

EDADM 651X. Ethics, Spirituality, & Social Justice in Administrative Practice. Cr. 3. Alt. SS, offered 2012. This course explores ethical models and practice of educational administrators. Participants develop personal and professional codes of ethics: define concepts of care, spirituality, democracy, equity, diversity, and social justice; and explain how those concepts relate to students’ academic and social success. Case studies offer opportunities to consider moral and legal consequences of decision-making. Participants develop their own vision of leadership.

EEOB 561X. Evolutionary and Ecological Genomics. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Permission of Instructor, BCBIO 444 recommended.  Use of genomic and other "omic" data in evolution and ecology. Subject matter includes data-generation platforms, a brief overview of computational methods, and examples of how phylogenomics, metagenomics, epigenomics, and population genomics are transforming the disciplines and evolution of ecology.

ENGL 270X. Science in Public: Communication, Controversy & Understanding. Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with JL MC 270X, SP CM 270X). Prereq: ENGL 250. Models of communication between scientists, engineers and other professionals and the public. Approaches to public engagement with science and technology including analysis of science communication on controversial topics such as climate change, evolution, and genetically modified organisms.

ENGL 319X. Studies in Language and Diversity. (3-0) Cr. 3. (Cross-listed with LING 319X). Prereqs ENGL 250. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits. Special topics related to the role of language and linguistics in US diversity, such as Dialects and American literature, American English Accents, Legal and Social Aspects of English-only Laws in the US. Connections between language use and social diversity.

ENGL 322X. Language and Society. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with LING)  Prereq: ENGL/LING 219.  Introduction to variation in language use in society. Survey of factors affecting language use including background characteristics of language users, location, and purpose of interaction in addition to institutional, state and national language policies.

ENGL 324X. Introduction to Teaching ESL Literacy. (2-1) Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with LING 324X). Prereq: ENGL/LING 219. Introduction to the issues and methods involved in teaching literacy skills to English as a second language (ESL) learners. The nature of literacy and materials and methods for developing ESL literacy at the middle school, high school, and adult ages across multiple levels of competency.

ENGL 325X. Teaching Methods for ESL Learners: Oral Communication Skills. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with LING)  Prereq: ENGL/LING 219. Issues and methods in teaching oral communication skills (listening, speaking, pronunciation) to English as a second language (ESL) learners. The nature of oral language ability. Materials and Methods for developing oral communication skills at middle school, high school, and adult contexts.

ENGL 493X. Advanced Creative Writing Workshop – Multi-Genre. Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: ENGL 304, ENGL 305, or ENGL 306; and junior standing. Advanced workshop of individual creative writing projects in short fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Readings and discussion of published examples of short fiction, nonfiction, and poetry by authors of national and international note. Extensive discussion and written analysis of elements of craft across genres. May be take more than once for credit – maximum of 6 credits.

ENGL 516X. Methods of Formal Linguistic Analysis. Cr. 3. S. (Same as LING). Prereq: ENGL/LING 219 or equivalent. Data and knowledge structures for formal representation of natural language and speech data. Designing and implementing algorithms for automating linguistic analysis tasks. Conceptual issues for natural lajnguage and speech processing programming.

ENGL 530X. Technology and Oral Language. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Cross Listed with LING 530X). Prereq. ENGL 219 or ENGL 511 or equivalent. Structure and description of oral language and discourse. How spoken language is linguistically described, analyzed and taught for research and for education. Using technology to record, transcribe, and analyze spoken language at all levels of linguistic structure.

ENGR 155X. Leadership in Engineering Student Organizations. (1-0) Cr. 1. Development of leadership skills of student organization leaders in the College of Engineering. Introduction to organizational leadership concepts and analyze organization purpose and function. Students practice mentoring and learn how their campus leadership experiences transfer to the field of engineering.

ENGR 250X. Leadership in Engineering Teams. (1-0) Cr. 1. F.S. Building and sustaining decision-making engineering teams. Students will explore the interrelated processes of discerning purpose, thinking systemically, developing reflective judgment, and exercising leadership by mobilizing and setting the direction for adaptive change within a team. Industry based examples and information from engineering and natural resource sciences will be infused into the course.

ENSCI 370X. GIS for Ecology and Environmental Science. Cr. Var. 1-6. F. (Same as BIOL 370X.Prereq: Six credits in biological and /or physical sciences, and permission of instructor. Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) with emphasis on ecological and environmental applications. No prior GIS experience required. Guided, individualized study of topics based on student background and interest. For students with prior experience, topics and activities are selected to build upon any previous experience and minimize duplication to previous GIS coursework. Potential topics include: basic concepts of GIS, data structures, database management, spatial analysis, modeling and visualization of ecological and environmental data. Case studies in ecological and environmental applications using ArcGIS. May be taken more than once for credit.

ENSCI 384X. Introduction to Ecosystems. (3-0) Cr. 3 S. Prereq: 12 credits of natural science including biology and chemistry. Biological and physical processes affecting material and energy flows in natural and managed ecosystems. Understanding and predicting climate and management impacts on ecosystem services and sustainability.

ENSCI 412X. Micropaleontology. (2-2) Cr. 3.Prereq: GEOL 102 and GEOL 102L. (Dual-listed with ENSCI 512X) (Cross-listed with GEOL 412X).  Evolution, identification and utility of major microfossil groups from the Mesozoic to present. Focus on Cenozoic applications including biostratigraphy, paleoclimate, and paleothermometry using assemblages, stable isotopes, Mg/Ca, and molecular fossils. Laboratory includes processing and analysis of specific microfossils. Major groups covered include foraminifera, calcareous nannofossils, sponge spicules, diatoms, radiolarians, and silicoflagellates.

ENSCI 512X. Micropaleontology. (2-2) Cr. 3.Prereq: GEOL 102 and GEOL 102L. (Dual-listed with ENSCI 512X) (Cross-listed with GEOL 512X).  Evolution, identification and utility of major microfossil groups from the Mesozoic to present. Focus on Cenozoic applications including biostratigraphy, paleoclimate, and paleothermometry using assemblages, stable isotopes, Mg/Ca, and molecular fossils. Laboratory includes processing and analysis of specific microfossils. Major groups covered include foraminifera, calcareous nannofossils, sponge spicules, diatoms, radiolarians, and silicoflagellates.

EVENT 333X. Entertainment Venue Management. (3-0). Cr. 3. F. Prereq: EVENT 271 or equivalent. Organization and management of various types of entertainment venues including clubs, theaters, auditoriums and arenas.

EVENT 373X. Wedding Planning. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.  Prereq: AESHM 111, EVENT 371. Study of the wedding industry. Focus on wedding planning processes and implementation, design, and business planning and development.


F

FOR 542X. Dynamics of Forest Stands. (2-3) Cr. 3. Alt. F. Offered even-numbered years. (Dual-listed with 442)  Prereqs: NREM 301, FOR 302, STAT 101 or their equivalents. Change in forest species composition and structure at the stand and landscape scales resulting from site quality, tree growth, competition, succession, and disturbance. Methods for assessing tree growth and reconstructing past stand development. Applications to forest and savanna management.

FS HN 260X. Introduction to Controversies in Science and Society. (Same as AN S 260X, NREM 260X.)  (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Introduction to evaluating controversial and multifaceted issues in natural resource management, animal science, and food science. Critically examine stakeholders’ beliefs, values, and ethics, while determining the credibility of information sources. Case studies and team-based activities.

FS HN 375X. Introduction to Nutritional Aspects of Food Processing. (2-0). Cr. 2. F. Prereqs: A course in Food Science, Nutrition or Engineering, or one year of relevant work experience. Examine the basics of food processing (i.e., thermal processing, freezing, drying) and subsequent influences on human nutrition and health. Credit will not be granted for both 375X and food processing FSHN 471 or FSHN 472.

FS HN 442X. Issues in Food and Society (2-0) Cr. 2. F. Prereqs: FS HN 242, 342. In-depth discussion, synthesis, and analysis of domestic and international food issues including: food systems from farm to fork, poverty and world hunger, overnutrition, population, agriculture and the environment, ethics, biotechnology, and policy.


G

GEOL 301X. Field Studies in Stratigraphy, Paleontology, and Paleoclimatology.  (0-3) Cr. 3. SS. Prereqs: GEOL 102, GEOL 315. A 3-week field research experience in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. Emphasis on documenting the impact of climate change on ecosystems and environments in the geological past via team-based, intensive field work. Concepts include paleoclimatology, stratigraphy, sedimentology, geochemistry, and vertebrate paleontology.

GEOL 412X. Micropaleontology. (2-2) Cr. 3.Prereq: GEOL 102 and GEOL 102L. (Dual-listed with GEOL 512X)  (Cross-listed with ENSCI 412X). Evolution, identification and utility of major microfossil groups from the Mesozoic to present. Focus on Cenozoic applications including biostratigraphy, paleoclimate, and paleothermometry using assemblages, stable isotopes, Mg/Ca, and molecular fossils. Laboratory includes processing and analysis of specific microfossils. Major groups covered include foraminifera, calcareous nannofossils, sponge spicules, diatoms, radiolarians, and silicoflagellates.

Geol 430X. Principles of Radiometric Dating. (2-0) Cr. 2. Prereq: GEOL 100 or GEOL 101, CHEM 163 or CHEM 167. (Dual-listed with Geol 530X) Introduction to the theory, methods, and applications of radiometric dating in the context of geologic systems. Primary focus on how radiogenic isotopes are used to solve a wide range of scientific problems that require knowing the absolute age of rocks, sediments, minerals, and fossils.

GEOL 489X. Survey of Remote Sensing Technologies (Dual-listed with GEOL 589X) (Same as MTEOR 489X, NREM 489X, E E 489X) (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: Four courses in physical or biological sciences or engineering. Electromagnetic radiation principles, active and passive sensors, multispectral and hyperspectral sensors, imaging radar, SAR, thermal imaging, lidar. Examples of applications.

GEOL 489L. Satellite Remote Sesing Laboratory (Dual-listed with GEOL 589L) (Same as MTEOR 489L, NREM 489L, E E 489L) (0-3) Cr. 1. S. Prereqs: Completion or concurrent enrollment in GEOL 489X). Processing and analysis of satellite sensor data (optical and radar). Provides practical applications in an environmental context.

GEOL 512X. Micropaleontology. (2-2) Cr. 3.Prereq: GEOL 102 and GEOL 102L. (Dual-listed with GEOL 412X)  (Cross-listed with ENSCI 512X). Evolution, identification and utility of major microfossil groups from the Mesozoic to present. Focus on Cenozoic applications including biostratigraphy, paleoclimate, and paleothermometry using assemblages, stable isotopes, Mg/Ca, and molecular fossils. Laboratory includes processing and analysis of specific microfossils. Major groups covered include foraminifera, calcareous nannofossils, sponge spicules, diatoms, radiolarians, and silicoflagellates.

Geol 530X. Principles of Radiometric Dating. (2-0) Cr. 2. Prereq: GEOL 100 or GEOL 101, CHEM 163 or CHEM 167. (Dual-listed with Geol 430X) Introduction to the theory, methods, and applications of radiometric dating in the context of geologic systems. Primary focus on how radiogenic isotopes are used to solve a wide range of scientific problems that require knowing the absolute age of rocks, sediments, minerals, and fossils.

GEOL 589X. Survey of Remote Sensing Technologies (Dual-listed with GEOL 489X) (Same as MTEOR 589X, NREM 589X, E E 589X) (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: Four courses in physical or biological sciences or engineering. Electromagnetic radiation principles, active and passive sensors, multispectral and hyperspectral sensors, imaging radar, SAR, thermal imaging, lidar. Examples of applications.

GEOL 589L. Satellite Remote Sesing Laboratory (Dual-listed with GEOL 489L) (Same as MTEOR 589L, NREM 589L, E E 589L) (0-3) Cr. 1. S. Prereqs: Completion or concurrent enrollment in GEOL 589X). Processing and analysis of satellite sensor data (optical and radar). Provides practical applications in an environmental context.

GEN 349X. The Genome Perspective in Biology. (2-0) Cr. 2. F. (Cross-listed with MICRO 349X, BIOL 349X, V PTH 349X). Prereqs: GEN 313 or GEN 320. How genome, RNA, and protein data are analyzed using computer technology to answer biological questions on topics ranging from microbial diversity to human health. An introduction for students in the life sciences to the fields of genomics, bioinformatics and systems.

GLOBE 120X. Geography of Global Resource Systems. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. A survey of geographic concepts with a specific focus on the distribution of natural and human-generated resources and the demand for those resources on a global scale.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

GLOBE 360X. Globalization and Development. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with SOC 360X)  Prereqs: 6 credits in the social sciences, including Econ 101, Soc 134, or Soc 230. Introduction to major concepts in the developmentism, globalism, and sustainability paradigms. Covers global flows and global risks, global institutions and organizations, and global North vs South linkages. Application to agriculture and rural development. Meets international perspectives requirement.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

GLOBE 398X. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. Arr. F. S. SS. Prereqs: Permission of faculty coordinator for the major. Students must complete GLOBE 398 Cooperative Education Approval Form and register for GLOBE 398 before commencing each work period. Work periods for students in cooperative education related to Global Resource Systems. Satisfactory/fail grading only. Maximum repeat 3 times.

GLOBE 441X. International Animal Agriculture. (3-0) Cr. 3. (Cross-listed with AN S 441X). Prereq: Two courses from AN S 223, AN S 225, AN S 226, AN S 229, AN S 235. An overview of animal agriculture with emphasis on animal agriculture in developing countries. Historical, economic, environmental; and political considerations will be assessed and evaluated. Issues related to gender, resilience and sustainability for different production systems will be investigated.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.


H

H S 464X. Physical Activity Epidemiology. (Cross Listed with 564X) (3-0) Cr. 3 S. Prereq: KIN 358 or HS 350 Understanding health benefits of physical activity on chronic disease prevention and health promotion throughout the life span, from clinical and public health perspectives. Discussion and application real-life physical activity assessment, research, guidelines, and promotion in population levels.

H S 564X. Physical Activity Epidemiology. (Cross Listed with 464X) (3-0) Cr. 3 S. Prereq: KIN 358 or HS 350; STAT 401. Understanding health benefits of physical activity on chronic disease prevention and health promotion throughout the life span, from clinical and public health perspectives. Discussion and application real-life physical activity assessment, research, guidelines, and promotion in population levels.

HCI 587X. Models and Theories in Human Computer Interaction. (5-0) Cr. 3. SS.  Survey of the multidisciplinary models and theories that form the foundation of the science of Human Computer Interaction. Application of the scientific method to solve practical problems by using analysis or approaches from the behavioral and social sciences, and information and computer technology.

HD FS 203X. Child Development Ages 0-3. (3-0) Cr. 3. SS. Prereqs: Admission to GPIDEA Early Care and Education for a Mobile Society program (listed as Early Childcare Education and Programming at ISU). This course will focus on development from birth to age three. Major theories and research on development will be covered including growth patterns, the influences of disabilities and risk factors, environmental factors and their effects on attachment styles, language acquisition, brain development, cognitive development, social-emotional development, and perceptual and sensory motor skills.

HD FS 204X. Child Guidance and Classroom Environments. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereqs: Admission to GPIDEA Early Care and Education for a Mobile Society program (listed as Early Childcare Education and Programming at ISU). This course is designed to provide students with a working knowledge of developmentally appropriate practice in child guidance. This goal will be accomplished through review of current guidance methods and programs in order to familiarize students with successful guidance techniques. By the end of this course, students will develop their own approach to guidance based upon practices best suited to their own unique skills and strengths.

HD FS 205X. Health, Safety, and Nutrition.  (3-0) Cr. 3. SS. Prereqs: Admission to GPIDEA Early Care and Education for a Mobile Society program (listed as Early Childcare Education and Programming at ISU). This course focuses on important elements for planning, promoting, and maintaining healthy and safe learning/care environments; understanding childhood illnesses and establishing healthy lifestyles; performing first aid; and maintaining care providers’ health. The course contains information about maintaining safe relationships with others, including identifying and reporting abuse, neglect, and exploitation of children. The course covers exploration of nutrients for life, feeding, food preparation and safety policies and guidelines, food allergies and intolerances, and appropriate feeding practices.

HD FS 206X. Professional Development. (3-0) Cr. 3 F.S. Prereqs: Admission to GPIDEA Early Care and Education for a Mobile Society program (listed as Early Childcare Education and Programming at ISU). This course will explore the role of a professional as a teacher, administrator or advocate in early childhood programming. Students will learn about professionalism and ethics, identifying child abuse, and applying universal precautions. Discussion of qualities of the early childhood educator role, program models, and working with children and professional colleagues.

HD FS 207X. Diversity in the Lives of Young Children and Families. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. SS. Prereqs: Admission to GPIDEA Early Care and Education for a Mobile Society program (listed as Early Childcare Education and Programming at ISU). In this course, students will explore cultural diversity in daily life and beliefs in families with young children. The focus is on U.S. families, with attention to the multiple cultures from which they come.

HD FS 223X. Child Development & Health. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Typical and atypical development of children from prenatal through middle childhood. Examination of healthy development and potential health problems in children. Discussion of impact of the family and society on development.

HD FS 404X. Working with Families. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereqs: Admission to GPIDEA Early Care adn Education for a Mobile Society program. Application of an ecological model to the understanding of variation in parental roles, perspectives, relationships, approaches, and challenges.

HD FS 405X. Technology and Young Children. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereqs: Admission to GPIDEA Early Care and Education for a Mobile Society program. Students will learn how electronic technology impacts the development of young children in educational, home, and community environments, and how technology can be used to enhance teaching and learning. Students will be critical thinkers and informed consumers of technology related to young children.

HIST 310X. Africa to 1880. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with AF AM 310X) Survey of the history of African societies, cultures and civilizations from earliest times to 1880. Evolution of states across the continent; social, economic, political, and cultural developments; nature and consequences of African interactions and relationship with Europeans. Prereq: 30 credits at Iowa State.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

HIST 311X. Africa Under Colonial Rule. (3-0) Cr. 3 S. (Cross-listed with AF AM 311X) Development of Africa from imposition of colonial rule to independence, including processes of European domination, African reaction and resistance, emergence of nationalism, and dismantling of colonialism.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

HIST 371X. Mexican American History. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with US LS 371X) History of the Mexican American community in the U.S. from the 1820s to the present. Topics include community development, employment, social marginalization, racism/discrimination, depression and world wars, civil rights, ethnic power and politics. Meets U.S. Diversity requirement.
Meets U. S. Diversity Requirement.

HIST 382X. History and Philosophy of the Scientific Revolution. (3-0) Cr. 3 F. (Cross-listed with PHIL 382X). Prereq: 3 credits in philosophy, 3 credits in history, or 6 credits in natural science. The emergence of empirical science as the authoritative methodology for production of knowledge about the natural world in the period between Copernicus and Kant. Scientific progress achieved during the period, including the work of Galileo, Descartes, and Newton. The re-shaping of epistemology in the Western intellectual tradition. Implications for philosophy and historiography.

HIST 453X. Creation of American Law. (3-0) Cr. 3 S. Prereq: Sophomore classification. Examines major topics in American legal history during the first century of American self-government. Focuses on the historical development of a specifically American corpus of law. Explores the ways in which jurists struggled to reconcile the essential consistency of the law with the rapidly changing demands of a modern commercial and increasingly democratic society.

HORT 331X. Hydroponic Food Crop Production. (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Alternate, offered even-numbered years. Prereq: HORT 221 or AGRON 114 or 3 cr. in biological sciences. Principles and practices of hydroponic systems, crop production and culture, aquaponic systems, and new food crops for hydroponic systems will be discussed. Laboratories will focus on demonstration and participation in practices and procedures used in hydroponic food crop production.

HRI 201X. Introduction to Casino Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. An overview of the gaming industry. History and development of gaming, casino operations, casino games, marketing of the core gaming products, and social and economic impacts of the gaming industry.

HRI 230X. Introduction to Hospitality Performance Analysis​. (3-0) Cr. 3 S. Introduction to Uniform Systems of Accounts for hospitality industry, profitability, income statements, budgeting, managing cash, accounts receivable and payable, costs control, pricing, and evaluation related to restaurant, lodging, and club industry. Preparation for a hospitality accounting certification exam.

HRI 383L. Introduction to Wine, Beer, and Spirits Lab. (0-2) Cr. 1. F.S.  Prereq: HRI 383 or concurrent enrollment. Must be at least 21 years old. The application of the management principles and procedures related to the sale and service of alcohol and specialty beverages served in the hospitality industry.

HRI 660X. Research Seminar in Tourism Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. Analysis and application of theories and research methods in tourism studies. Application of current perspectives and theories related to tourism and tourist behaviors to the development of research studies.

 

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