Experimental Courses 2015-2016, A-F

A B C D E F


A B E 423X. Energy and the Environment. (3-0) Cr. 3. SS. Prereqs: MATH 160 or higher, PHYS 221; A E 216 or M E 231. Overview of energy engineering principles, energy use, and environmental impacts. Fossil fuel energy resources and conversion. Nuclear energy principles, reactors, fuel cycle. Renewable energy systems: solar, wind, water, and biomass conversions. Air, water and land pollution. Energy, global warming, and climate change.

A B E 546X. Introduction Into Bioplastics & Biocomposites. (2-2) Cr.3. S. (Cross-listed with BRT 546X, TSM 546X, M S E 546X). Prereqs: CHEM 163 and MATH 151, or permission of instructor. A study of bio-polymers and related processes used in manufacturing. Lecture and laboratory activities focus on materials, properties, processes, policies and current state of the art of bioplastics.

A ECL 333X. Fisheries Technology (1-3) Cr. 2. F. Prereq: BIOL 212. Introduction to techniques used in the collection and interpretation of fish population data in the field and in the lab. Course objectives include an understanding of population survey methodology and improving student critical thinking and teamwork skills. Laboratory focuses on field trips and hands-on sampling experience. Special course fees.

A M D 329X. Digital Textile Printing for Apparel Design. (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: A M D 321 and A M D 325. Overview of the use of digital printing in the textile and apparel industry, color matching, repeat print patterns, engineered prints, and creation of apparel prototypes.

A M D 525X. Experimental Patternmaking. (2-4) Cr. 3. Alt S. Prereq: AMD 221 or equivalent, AMD 225 or equivalent, AMD 510 or taking concurrently, permission of instructor. Research, analyze, and apply experimental patternmaking techniques to original garments suitable for entry into a juried competition/exhibitions. Compare, contrast, and organize a framework of research patternmaking principles through content analysis or other appropriate research techniques. Documentation of learning and design process.

ACCT 589X. Corporate Social Responsibility Reporting (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: ACCT 501. Examines the theory and practice of social and environmental reporting, the role of the corporation in society, and the mechanisms by which society might hold corporations accountable for their actions.

AER E 433X. Spacecraft Dynamics and Control. (3-0) Cr. 3 F. Prereqs: EM 345 (Dynamics) Introduction to modern spacecraft attitude dynamics and control. Rotational kinematics and 3-dimensional rigid-body dynamics. Stability of spinning spacecraft. Spacecraft attitude stabilization and rotational maneuvers. Spacecraft attitude determination and control subsystems (ADCS). Spacecraft actuators, sensors, and external disturbances.

AER E 463X. Introduction to Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Dual-listed with AER E 563X). Prereq: senior standing in College of Engineering. Introduction to the theory and methods of Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO), including system coupling, system sensitivity methods, decomposition methods, MDO formulations (such as multiple-discipline feasible (MDF), individual discipline feasible (IDF) and all-at-once (AAO) approaches, and MDO search methods.

AER E 468X. Large-Scale Complex Engineered Systems (LSCES). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Dual-listed with AER E 568X) (Cross-listed with IE 468X). Prereqs: senior standing in College of Engineering or permission of AER E 468X instructor. Introduction to the theorectical foundation and methods associated with the design for large-scale complex engineered systems, including objective function formation, design reliability, value-driven design, product robustness, utility theory, economic factors for the formation of a value function and complexity science as a means of detecting unintended consequences in the product behavior.

AER E 501X. Advanced Engineering Analysis. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Linear ordinary differential equations with variable coefficients; hyperbolic, parabolic, and elliptic equations; tensors.

AER E 554X. Metaheuristic Optimization and Modeling for Complex System Design. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Graduate standing in College of Engineering or permission of instructor. Introduction to the theoretical foundation and methods associated with meta-modeling and metaheuristic optimization, including categories of meta-modeling methods and applications in which each class of meta-modeling methods should and could be used, as well as metaheuristic optimization methods and the types of applications for which each is best suited.

AER E 563X. Introduction to Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Dual-listed with AER E 463X). Prereq: senior standing in College of Engineering. Introduction to the theory and methods of Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO), including system coupling, system sensitivity methods, decomposition methods, MDO formulations (such as multiple-discipline feasible (MDF), individual discipline feasible (IDF) and all-at-once (AAO) approaches, and MDO search methods.

AER E 567X. Nanomechanics of Materials. (2-1) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with E M 567X, M S E 567X). Prereq: E M 566 or permission of instructor. Continuum approaches to material deformation and nanostructure evolution. Thermodynamics and kinetics. Nucleation and growth. Large strain formulation. Surface and interface tension and phenomena. Chemical reactions, phase transformations, and dislocations.

AER E 568X. Large-Scale Complex Engineered Systems (LSCES). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Dual-listed with AER E 468X) (Cross-listed with IE 568X). Prereq: senior standing in College of Engineering or permission of AER E 568X instructor. Introduction to the theorectical foundation and methods associated with the design for large-scale complex engineered systems, including objective function formation, design reliability, value-driven design, product robustness, utility theory, economic factors for the formation of a value function and complexity science as a means of detecting unintended consequences in the product behavior.

AESHM 180E. Freshman Field Study: Event and Hospitality Management. (.5-1) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: Enrollment in AESHM Learning Community (Directions) - Member or Peer Mentor; Permission of Instructor. Study of and tours of regional areas of interest to majors in Event and Hospitality Management. Trip to regional location under supervision of faculty member. Locations vary, 2-3 day trip. Journal entries and final report/analysis are required.

AESHM 180N. Freshman Field Study: Apparel, Merchandising, and Design.  (.5-1) Cr. 1. F. Prereqs: Enrollment in AESHM Learning Community (Common Threads) - Member or Peer Mentor; Permission of Instructor. Study of and tours of regional areas of interest to apparel majors in the AESHM Department. Trip to regional location under supervision of faculty member. Locations vary, 2-3 day trip. Journal entries and final report/analysis are required.

AF AM 311X. Africa Under Colonial Rule. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with HIST 311X) Prereqs: 30 credits at Iowa State. Development of Africa from imposition of colonial rule to independence, including processes of European domination, African reaction and resistance, emergence of nationalism, and dismantling of colonialism.

AGRON 106X. Global Agriculture in a Changing World. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Understanding climate and its effects on global distribution of food and water resources. The nature of climate and its variability in space and time. Use of satellites and related technology to monitor agricultural production, water availability and climate. Influence of climate and climate change on drought famine and other disruptions of essential resources.

AGRON 528X. Quantitative Genetics for Plant Breeding. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: AGRON 506 or AGRON 513. An introduction to the application of quantitative genetics to plant breeding programs.

AN S 260X. Introduction to Controversies in Science and Society. (Same as NREM 260X, FS HN 260X.)  (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Introduction to evaluating controversial and multifaceted issues in natural resource management, animal science, and food science. Critically examine stakeholders’ beliefs, values, and ethics, while determining the credibility of information sources. Case studies and team-based activities.

AN S 310X. Advanced Career Preparation in Animal Science. (1-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereqs: AN S 210. 8-week course. Awareness and development of soft skills and critical thinking skills. Assist students in specific career paths and goals pertaining to the field of veterinary medicine, graduate education, or employment after graduation. Only one credit of AN S 310A, 310B, 310C may be applied toward graduation. Offered Satisfactory-Fail only.
A. Veterinary Medicine
B. Graduate School
C. Industry

AN S 569X. Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology. Cr. 2. F. (Same as TOX 569X.) Prereqs: BBMD 301, Biology 258 or An S 331. Chemical agents that target developmental and reproductive systems in animals and humans, both male and female. The influence that timeline of developmental in utero and what part of reproductive organ have on outcome of environmental exposures will be developed. The physiological changes due to exposure, and mechanistic pathways activated by xenobiotics will be defined and the consequences of these changes will be explored.

ARCH 458X. Atmospheres and Affects. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Graduate or Junior or Senior classification. Contemporary approach to architectural atmospheres. Students will be challenged to think critically and independently about feeling or mood in architecture as described by key thinkers in this field; to comprehend the relationship between architecture and affect; and to understand how social, technical and environmental dialogues impact on architectural design.

ARCH 517X. Big and Tall: Construction History from the Pyramids to the Burj. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Junior or Graduate level standing. History of human construction over the last 4500 years. Focus on materials and techniques to understand histories of economics, industry, and labor and to related disciplines such as structural and civil engineering. Production methods, economics and design relationships.

ARTGR 463X. 3D Motion Graphics. Cr. 3. SS. (Dual-listed with ARTGR 563X). Prereqs: Concurrent enrollment in ARTGR 370, ARTGR 371, or ARTGR 470. 3D visualization in a Motion Graphics context. Emphasis on design in 3D computer animation as it relates to various electronic media.

ARTGR 464X. Digital Imaging. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Dual-listed with ARTGR 564X). Prereqs: Concurrent enrollment in ARTGR 370, ARTGR 371 or ARTGR 470. This studio course will cover experimental techniques using the digital drawing tablet combined with manual drawing mediums, exploring the digital tablet, scanner, and camera as ways to collect and make images, conceptual and compositional development of digital techniques and software, and connecting digital techniques to visual processes and ideation. Students will have a better understanding of different ways of working digitally while exploring image-making processes.

ARTGR 563X. 3D Motion Graphics. Cr. 3. SS. (Dual-listed with ARTGR 463X). Prereqs: Concurrent enrollment in ARTGR 370, ARTGR 371, or ARTGR 470. 3D visualization in a Motion Graphics context. Emphasis on design in 3D computer animation as it relates to various electronic media.

ARTGR 564X. Digital Imaging. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Dual-listed with ARTGR 464X). Prereqs? Concurrent enrollment in ARTGR 370, ARTGR 371 or ARTGR 470. This studio course will cover experimental techniques using the digital drawing tablet combined with manual drawing mediums, exploring the digital tablet, scanner, and camera as ways to collect and make images, conceptual and compositional development of digital techniques and software, and connecting digital techniques to visual processes and ideation. Students will have a better understanding of different ways of working digitally while exploring image-making processes.

ART H 499X. Visual Culture Studies Senior Capstone Seminar. (4-0) Cr. 4. F. Prereqs: Admission to the B.A. in Art and Design--Visual Culture Studies Concentration and senior standing; or permission of instructor. Reading of major texts in the field of visual culture studies, writing exercises, and guided instruction in the process of conducting research and reporting results of the research process. Written paper expected at end of the course.

ARTIS 375X. Introduction to Interactive Art. (0-6) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: ARTIS 212 or permission of instructor. Introduction to the tools required to create interactive artworks and kinetic sculptures. Students will learn how to build simple mechanical artworks and control those artworks with custom fabricated electronics. Students will use CNC routers, laser cutters and other computer assisted equipment to create their projects.

ARTIS 432X. Sequential Narrative Drawing. (Dual-listed with ARTIS 532X) (0-6) Cr.3. S. Prereqs: ARTIS 330 or permission of instructor after portfolio review for undergraduate students; graduate classification and permission of instructor after portfolio review for graduate students. A studio course in drawing focusing on the fundamentals of communicating a narrative through sequential images. Applications include concept art for graphic novels, children’s books, comic strips, video games, storyboarding for live action and animated films including instructional and marketing applications, plus character and scene development.

ARTIS 473X. Video art. (0-6) Cr. 3. (Dual-listed with ARTIS 573X). Prereq: ARTIS 212 or Permission of Instructor. Usage of professional video editing software and application of best practices for video production and post-production to realize original artworks. Creation of narrative and non-narrative videos and site specific video installations. prominent examples in the history of video art provide context for the coursework. Non-repeatable for graduate students.

ARTIS 491X. Post Baccalaureate Capstone Course. 1Cr. Arr. F. Prereq: Enrollment in Post Baccalaureate Program. Exhibition of artwork completed in the Post Baccalaureate program, required for fulfillment of certificate.

ARTIS 532X. Sequential Narrative Drawing. (Dual-listed with ARTIS 432X) (0-6) Cr.3. S. Prereqs: ARTIS 330 or permission of instructor after portfolio review for undergraduate students; graduate classification and permission of instructor after portfolio review for graduate students. A studio course in drawing focusing on the fundamentals of communicating a narrative through sequential images. Applications include concept art for graphic novels, children’s books, comic strips, video games, storyboarding for live action and animated films including instructional and marketing applications, plus character and scene development.

ARTIS 573X. Video art. (Dual-listed with 473X) (0-6) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: ARTIS 212 or Permission of Instructor Usage of professional video editing software and application of best practices for video production and post-production to realize original artworks. Creation of narrative and non-narrative videos and site specific video installations. prominent examples in the history of video art provide context for the coursework. Non-repeatable for graduate students.

ASL 107X. Introduction to the Deaf-World. (1-0) Cr. 1 F. Nature and significance of the Deaf-World as a cultural and linguistic minority.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

ASL 305X. ASL Classifiers and Depiction. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: ASL 205. Focused analysis, documentation, discussion, and increased development of classifiers and depiction in ASL. Investigation in how these grammatical features are deliberately incorporated into conversational, presentational, scientific, and artistic language production.

ASL 325X. Deaf Peoples: Pre-World War II. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.  Prereqs: ASL 206 or instructor's permission. Perspectives on and treatment of deaf people as individuals and groups prior to World War II. Taught in American Sign Language.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

ASL 350X. Comparative Linguistics of American Sign Language. (Cross-listed with LING 350X) (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: ASL 206. Scientific and stylistic language analysis. Phonology, morphology, semantics, syntax, and social-cultural pragmatics of American Sign Language. Comparative prescriptive and descriptive views on ASL and English form and function.


B

B M E 208X. Introduction to Bioinstrumentation. (2-3) Cr. 3. F.SS. (Cross-listed with B M E 208X). Prereqs: MATH 165. Fundamental, laboratory intensive course in bio-instrumentation with an emphasis on acquiring and analyzing biomedical signals to obtain relevant information. Topics covered include an overview of basic medical measurement systems, labs illustrating data acquisition from different body systems, and an introduction to statistical analysis and its relationship to biological variability.

B M E 341X. BioMEMS and Nanotechnology. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with E E 341X.) Prereq: B M E 220. Overview of Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) technologies for bioengineering, fundamentals of microfluidic device design, fabrication, and characterization, survey of microfluidic functional building blocks for lab-on-a-chip applications including mixers, valves, channels, and chambers. Topics of nanotechnology in bioengineering, nanoscale building block technologies for bioengineering including self-assembling, surface chemical treatment, nano-imprinting, nano-particles, nano-tubes, nano-wires, and stimuli-responsive biomaterials.

B M E 450X. Biosensors. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., even-numbered years. (Cross-listed with E E 450X.) Prereq: B M E 220. Overview of biosensors and bioanalytical challenges; designing for performance including various analytical problems, ion-selective membranes, characteristics of enzymes and basics of bioaffinity sensing; fundamentals of bioselective layers including depositing films and membranes, surfaces for immobilization and bioselective agents; survey of different biosensing technologies including electroanalytical, biomembrane, optical, and acoustic-wave based sensors

B M S 335X. Molecular and Cellular Basis of Disease. (1-0) Cr. 1. F. (Dual-listed with B M S 535X). Prereqs: First-year classification in veterinary medicine or graduate student status. Descriptions of molecular and cellular biology, especially as it pertains to veterinary medicine. Discussions of cellular components, cellular functions and anomalies thereof. Emphasis placed on divergences relevant to companion animals and livestock.

B M S 535X. Molecular and Cellular Basis of Disease. (1-0) Cr. 1. F. (Dual-listed with B M S 335X). Prereqs: First-year classification in veterinary medicine or graduate student status. Descriptions of molecular and cellular biology, especially as it pertains to veterinary medicine. Discussions of cellular components, cellular functions and anomalies thereof. Emphasis placed on divergences relevant to companion animals and livestock.

BBMB 120X. The Biochemistry of Beer. (2-0) Cr. 2. F. An introduction to the major classes of biomolecules, basic biochemical concepts, enzymology, metabolism and the genetic engineering as they apply to the production and flavor of beer. All aspects of biochemistry of beer will be covered, including the malting of barley, starch conversion, yeast fermentation, and the chemical changes that occur during the aging of beer. Intended for nonmajors. Natural science majors limited to elective credit only.

BBMB 121X. Medicines, Drugs and You. (2-0) Cr. 2. F. Prereqs: One year of high school chemistry or CHEM 50 and biology. An introduction to how medicines treat disease, what drug molecules look like, how they function, how they can be toxic, modern therapeutics ranging from over-the-counter pain relievers, antibiotics and anti-depressants, to anti-cancer chemotherapies, a discussion of illegal drugs from toxicity to mechanism of action and potential therapeutic benefits. Intended for students of all majors.

BBMB 510X. Molecular Biology and Biochemistry of RNA. (2-0) Cr. 2. F. Prereq: BIOL 313, BBMB 405, BBMB 502, or Gen 409, or equivalent. Biochemical processes that define structure and function of nucleic acids.  Emphasis on the molecular processes that take place during synthesis, processing, and function of different RNA species; review of recent advances in RNA research.

BCBIO 322X. Introduction to Bioinformatics and Computational Biology. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with BIOL 322X and GEN 322X). Prereq: BIOL 212. Genome sequencing, assembly, structural and functional annotation, and comparative genomics. Investigating these topics will develop skills in programming and scripting (Perl and/or Python), the use of biological databases, sequence alignment, homology search, identification of sequence patterns, construction of phylogenetic trees, and comparative genomics.

BIOL 322X. Introduction to Bioinformatics and Computational Biology. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with BCBIO 322X and GEN 322X). Prereq: BIOL 212. Genome sequencing, assembly, structural and functional annotation, and comparative genomics. Investigating these topics will develop skills in programming and scripting (Perl and/or Python), the use of biological databases, sequence alignment, homology search, identification of sequence patterns, construction of phylogenetic trees, and comparative genomics.

BIOL 358X. Bee biology, management, and beekeeping. (2-0) Cr. 2. F. (Cross-listed with ENT 358X) Prereq: Permission of an instructor. Biology and management of bee pollinators, focusing on honey bees. Fundamentals of bee biology, including life history, behavior, and development. Practical aspects of beekeeping and non-honey bee pollinator management, including disease management, pollination, and honey production. Working with live bee hives and demonstration of practical beekeeping skills will occur during three weekend trips to local hives.

BIOL 370X. GIS for Ecology and Environmental Science.Cr. Var. 1-6. F. (Same as ENSCI 370X.Prereq: Six credits in biological and /or physical sciences, and permission of instructor. Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) with emphasis on ecological and environmental applications. No prior GIS experience required. Guided, individualized study of topics based on student background and interest. For students with prior experience, topics and activities are selected to build upon any previous experience and minimize duplication to previous GIS coursework. Potential topics include: basic concepts of GIS, data structures, database management, spatial analysis, modeling and visualization of ecological and environmental data. Case studies in ecological and environmental applications using ArcGIS. May be taken more than once for credit. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis.

BRT 546X. Introduction Into Bioplastics & Biocomposites. (2-2) Cr.3. S. (Cross-listed with A B E 546X, TSM 546X, M S E 546X). Prereqs: CHEM 163 and MATH 151, or permission of instructor. A study of bio-polymers and related processes used in manufacturing. Lecture and laboratory activities focus on materials, properties, processes, policies and current state of the art of bioplastics.


C

C E 395X. Global Perspectives in Transportation. Cr. 3. SS. Prereq: CE 355 or equivalent. Background on historical civil engineering design and construction. Impacts of historical, cultural, social, economic, ethical, environmental, and political conditions on the design and construction of various infrastructure projects outside the United States. Global road safety and intermodal operations. Addressing transportation problems in a large metropolitan area.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

C I 422X. Teaching and Learning Iowa History. (30-15) Cr. 3. S.S. (Dual-listed with C I 522X) Multicultural and social justice focus on Iowa history; different theme each summer. Effective pedagogical and assessment strategies for integrating these themes into K-12 curriculum.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

C I 522X. Teaching and Learning Iowa History. (30-15) Cr. 3. S.S. (Dual-listed with C I 422X) Multicultural and social justice focus on Iowa history; different theme each summer. Effective pedagogical and assessment strategies for integrating these themes into K-12 curriculum.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

C I 510X. Foundations of Game-based Learning. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with HCI 510X). Prereq: 12 graduate credits. Theories, principles and best practices of utilizing games in educational environments. Topics include the theoretical foundations of learning games and game play, identity development in
online environments, and assessment of learning in and out of games.

C R P 251X. Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems. (2-2) Cr. 3 F. Fundamentals of the concepts, models, functions and operations of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Principals of spatial problems, spatial questions and hypotheses and their solutions based on spatial data, GIS tools and techniques. Integration of concepts and applications through lectures and facilitated labs. Applications from a variety of areas including design; physical, social, and human science; engineering; agriculture; business and medicine, landscape architecture, architecture, urban planing, geology, forestry, biology, and ecology.

C R P 325X. US Housing Policy. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Housing problems, government housing policy, and housing as a field of urban planning practice. Course introduces students to empirical analysis of housing-related issues and applications to policy. Particular focus on the social and spatial segmentation of housing in the U.S. and the role of policy in housing production and regulation.

C R P 351X. Intermediate Geographic Information Systems. (2-2) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: CRP 251X. Intermediate GIS for design and non-design students to learn concepts of digital management and representation of spatial data, including spatial problems, data sources and structures, simple spatial operations and cartographic issues. Gain skill set to effectively display feature and tabular data,query features using logical expressions, edit spatial and attribute data, associate tables with joins and relates, produce maps, reports, and graphs.

C R P 421X. Financing Historic Preservation Projects and Revitalizing Communities. (3-0). Cr. 3. F. Investigation of the financial tools and incentives used to promote the rehabilitation and redevelopment of historic buildings and neighborhoods in cities and towns. Study of broader economic and social impacts on communities. Examinations of completed preservation projects around the United States.

C R P 427X. Comparative Urbanism and Urban Studies. (3-0). Cr. 3. F. Focus on collaborative learning of urbanism and urban studies among students at Iowa State University and thier counterparts in foreign universities, including Tongji University in China. Videoconferences will be held for students and faculty members across countries to share course materials, class lectures and to discuss selected topics of mutual interest.

C R P 437X. Public Participation in Planning. (3-0). Cr. 3. S. Rationale and need for public participation in community planning and development. Techniques used to garner participation, and the ability to integrate techniques into a broader participatory process. Techniques covered will include public hearings, public meetings, social action construct, advisory committees, scenario building, social media and asset mapping. Students will also work with a community to demonstrate skills learned.

C R P 453X. Smart Cities. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Introduction to concepts of smart cities. Study of novel technologies for smart governance, sustainable energy, innovative ways for citizens' engagement, improved safety, mobility and healthy living. Examples of national and international smart cities. Living Lab experience.

C R P 457X. GeoGames for Civic Engagement. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Explore design and implementation of participatory geospatial games; define GeoGames; work on common goals in interdisciplinary teams; distinguish among different types of GeoGames; designing GeoGames for civic engagement, community visioning, and community planning.

C R P 458X. Web Mapping/GIS. (2-2) Cr. 3. (Dual-listed with C R P 558X). (Same as L A 458X/558X). Prereq: CRP 451/551, L A 302, GEOL 452/552 or instructor permission.Use and development of online mapping tools to support participatory GIS, Volunteered Geographic Information, information sharing, geodesign and decision making actions. Geoprocessing and Web Scripting/coding and user interface design. Laboratory emphasis practical applications and uses of Web GIS.

C R P 459X. GeoVisualization: Imagining Maps. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Fundamentals of communication with maps, reading and understanding maps, navigation in cities as well as indoors, usability of online interactive GIS applications, and online GIS-based participatory applications. Students learn to identify spatial research questions, write corresponding research hypothesis and execute experiments in order to collect relevant data, analyze them and present the results in an oral presentation.

C R P 460X. Social Justice and Planning. Cr. 3. F. (2-2) (Dual-listed with CRP 560X). Investigation of the topic of social justice as it relates to the challenge of planning more socially just urban societies, emphasizing the importance of social justice issues to planning in a globalized world. Includes a range of issues and case studies of local social justice initiatives, both US and global. Students will complete individual service learning projects as part of the course requirements.

C R P 471X. Real Estate Development. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Introduction to real estate issues related to planning, design, and development. Cases exploring the property development process, including residential, office, retail, hotel, and mixed-use. Examines how location decisions are made and property values are created. Focuses on urban, suburban, and rural redevelopment opportunities.

C R P 479X. Public Finance and Planning. Cr. 3. S. (3-0) (Dual-listed with CRP 579X). Effective management of state and local government finance critical to successful community and regional planning. Economic concepts, topics in budgeting, revenue, expenditure, and financing, analytical techniques, economic impact, and case studies. Understanding of economic assessment in planning and understanding of various linkages between planning and public finance.

C R P 511X. Documenting the Historic Built Environment. (3-0). Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Knowledge of GIS helpful but not required. Principals and methods for researching, identifying, recording, and analyzing buildings, districts, and sites that are historically or architecturally significant. Classroom and fieldwork components will use real-world historic places as case studies.

C R P 521X. Historic Preservation Planning: Theory and Practice. (3-0). Cr. 3. S. Introduction to the history, theory, and practice of historic preservation and cultural resource management. Cases exploring preservation in US and global contexts; politics of preservation; preservation technologies; and relationship of preservation to other community issues.

C R P 558X. Web Mapping/GIS. (2-2) Cr. 3. (Dual-listed with C R P 458X). (Same as L A 458X/558X).Prereq: CRP 451/551, L A 302, GEOL 452/552 or instructor permission.Use and development of online mapping tools to support participatory GIS, Volunteered Geographic Information, information sharing, geodesign and decision making actions. Geoprocessing and Web Scripting/coding and user interface design. Laboratory emphasis practical applications and uses of Web GIS.

C R P 559X. Digital Design Methods for Landscape Architecture. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with
L A 559X) Introduction to digital tools used by landscape architects for design development and design communication, including 3D modeling, landscape CAD, image processing, geolocation/navigation (GPS), and geospatial data handling (GIS).

C R P 560X. Social Justice and Planning. (3-0). Cr. 3. F. (Dual-listed with C R P 460X). Investigation of the topic of social justice as it relates to the challenge of planning more socially just urban societies, emphasizing the importance of social justice issues to planning in a globalized world. Includes a range of issues and case studies of local social justice initiatives, both US and global. Students will complete individual service learning projects as part of the course requirements.

C R P 579X. Public Finance and Planning. (3-0). Cr. 3. F. (Dual-listed with C R P 479X). Effective management of state and local government finance critical to successful community and regional planning. Economic concepts, topics in budgeting, revenue, expenditure, and financing, analytical techniques, economic impact, and case studies. Understanding of economic assessment in planning and understanding of various linkages between planning and public finance.

CHEM 326X. Chemical Kinetics. (1-0). Cr. 1. S. Prereqs: CHEM 167, 177, 178, or 201; MATH 166; CHEM 324 and 325 are recommended. Kinetic theory, rate laws, temperature dependence of rate constants, transition-state theory, reaction mechanisms, kinetic isotope effects, catalysts, Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and Marcus theory.

CHEM 573X. Nanochemistry. (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereqs: CHEM 301, CHEM 324. Synthesis, characterization, properties and applications of nanoscale materials (≈ 0.5-500 nm), relationship with molecular, meso and bulk compounds. Chemistry of solid surfaces, zero-, one- and two-dimensional nanostructures (0D, 1D, 2D), semiconductor quantum dots, plasmonic nanoparticles, carbon nanomaterials, porous nanomaterials, potential health and safety impacts.

CHIN 499X. Internship in Chinese. Cr. 1-3. SS. Prereqs: 9 credits of Chinese at the 300 level; permission of advisor and WLC Internship Coordinator. Work experience using Chinese in the public or private sector, combined with academic work under faculty supervision.

CJ ST 410X. Capital Punishment. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereqs: CJ ST 240. History, philosophy, demographics, administration, and punishment rationales of capital punishment in the United States from its founding to the present. Methods of execution and trends in public opinion about the death penalty. Examination of correlates of capital offending and criminological characteristics of persons who are sentenced to death.

CL PS 370X. Special Topics in Leadership Studies. 1‐3 contact hours, corresponding to credit hours. S.S. Seminar on special topics, research, and theory in Leadership Studies. Students must register for a different topic each time. Not open to first year students.

CL PS 422X. Leadership Capstone Seminar: Theory to Practice (3-0) Cr. 3. S.F. Prerequisite: CL PS 322. Critical analysis of leadership theory to inform practice with emphasis on ethical leadership and the alignment of personal and organizational values.

CL ST 368X. Religions of Ancient Greece and Rome. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Cross-listed with RELIG 368X. Nature, origins and development of religious beliefs and practices in ancient Greece and Rome from earliest times up to the rise of Christianity. Roles of divinities and rituals in lives of individuals and families and the governing of city-states and empires. Emphasis on historical contexts of the Graeco-Roman world and influences of neighboring cultures in Africa and Asia.

CL ST 384X. Roman Italy: An Introduction (2-0) Cr. 1. S. (Cross-listed with RELIG 384X.) Prereq: Enrollment limited to students participating in CL ST 385X. Instructor permission required. Introduction to the topography, history, archaeology, monuments, and art of Rome from the Regal period through late Antiquity; attention given to the culture of modern Italy, preparatory to study abroad in Rome.

CL ST 385X. Study Abroad: Roman Italy: Building the Empire. (8.9-4.4) Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with HIST 385X). Prereq: CL ST 384X and instructor’s permission. Supervised on-site instruction in the history, archaeology, monuments, and art of Rome and environs from the 8th center BCE to the 5th century CE; attention given to the culture of modern Italy.

COM S 127X. Introduction to Programming for Problem Solving. (3-2). Cr. 4 F. Prereq: MATH 140. Introduction to computer programming with an emphasis on problem solving. Topics include: program structures, expressions, variables, decision and logic, iteration, collections, input and output. Program construction and testing. Programming assignments including games and applications. No prior programming experience necessary. This course is intended for Computer Science majors.

COM S 435X. Algorithms for Large Data Sets: Theory and Practice. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Dual-listed with Com S  535X). Prereqs: COM S 228, COM S 330 or CPRE 310 or COM S 311 or equivalent. Challenges involved in solving computational problems on massive data sets. Discussion of computational problems that arise in the context of web search, social network analysis, recommendation systems, and online advertising etc. Theoretical aspects include modeling the computational problems using graphs, study of similarity measures and hash functions, and design of efficient algorithms for graphs. Practical aspects include implementation and performance evaluation of the algorithms on real world data sets. Graduate credit requires a written report on current research.

COM S 513X. Foundations and Applications of Program Analysis. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with CPR E 513X). Prereqs: COM S 331, COM S 342. Techniques for automatic reasoning of code and program execution for predicting software behavior. Theory and foundations of points-to analysis, data-flow analysis, control-flow analysis, taint analysis, dependency analysis, and inter-procedural analysis. Development of algorithms, tools, benchmarks, and methodology needed to solve problems using program analysis and to establish foundations for program analysis research.

COM S 535X. Algorithms for Large Data Sets: Theory and Practice. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Dual-listed with Com 435X). Prereqs: COM S 228, COM S 330 or CPRE 310 or COM S 311 or equivalent. Challenges involved in solving computational problems on massive data sets. Discussion of computational problems that arise in the context of web search, social network analysis, recommendation systems, and online advertising etc. Theoretical aspects include modeling the computational problems using graphs, study of similarity measures and hash functions, and design of efficient algorithms for graphs. Practical aspects include implementation and performance evaluation of the algorithms on real world data sets. Graduate credit requires a written report on current research.

COM S 559X. Security and Privacy in Cloud Computing. (3-0) Cr. 3 S. (Cross-listed with CPR E 559X) Prereqs: COM S 352 or CPR E 308, and COM S 486 or CPR E 489 or CPR E 530. Overview of cloud computing models, security and privacy threats in cloud computing related to data and computation outsourcing, theoretical results and practical techniques for secure cloud computing and its applications.

COM S 560X. Applications of Machine Learning to Security. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with INFAS 560X and CPR E 560X). Prereqs: CPR E 531; COM S 474 or Com S 573. Examination of applications of machine learning and big data techniques to various security and privacy problems, and attacks to machine learning algorithms and big data infrastructures as well as their mitigations.

COMST 104X. Orientation to Communication Studies. (1-0). Cr. 1. F. Prereq: Available only for Communication Studies majors. Orientation to Communication Studies discipline, program requirements and career opportunities. Required of communication studies majors. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

COMST 210X. Communication and U.S. Diversity. (3-0) Cr. 3 SS. Introduction to the role of diversity in communication. Developing competent communication with diverse social groups within interpersonal and organizational contexts in the United States. Topics may include structured reflection of one’s role in diverse communication experiences, cultural variations in communication mores, impacts of racial/ethnic/gender identities on communication, workplace policies regarding cultural diversity, the intersection of communication and cultural privilege, communication practices that can reduce prejudice/discrimination, and communication characteristics of advocates for diversity.
Meets U. S. Diversity Requirement.

CJ ST 339X. Liberty and Law in America. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with POL S 339X and PHIL 339X). Prereq: sophomore status. An exploration of competing conceptions of liberty in American political thought and debates about how liberty should be protected by the law. Contemporary debates about topics such as health care, drugs, property, speech, religion, and sex.

CPR E 231X. Cyber Security Concepts and Tools. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.F. Prereq: COM S 107, or 207, or 227, or E E 285. Basic concepts of practical computer and Internet security and the tools used to protect and attack systems and networks. Computer and network security methods including: user authentication, access control, firewalls, intrusion detection and wireless networks. Vulnerability assessment tools and methods. Ethics and legal issues in cyber security. Laboratory experiments and exercises including computer and network configuration.

CPR E 513X. Foundations and Applications of Program Analysis. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with COM S 513X). Prereqs: COM S 331, COM S 342. Techniques for automatic reasoning of code and program execution for predicting software behavior. Theory and foundations of points-to analysis, data-flow analysis, control-flow analysis, taint analysis, dependency analysis, and inter-procedural analysis. Development of algorithms, tools, benchmarks, and methodology needed to solve problems using program analysis and to establish foundations for program analysis research.

CPR E 522X. Cognitive Radio Networks. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with E E 522X). Prereq: Instructor approval. Topics on cognitive radio networks: Cognitive Radio Networks Architecture; Software Defined Radio Architecture; Spectrum Sensing; Spectrum Management; Spectrum Sharing; Spectrum Mobility; Applications of Cognitive Radio Networks.

CPR E 559X. Security and Privacy in Cloud Computing. (3-0) Cr. 3 S. (Cross-listed with COM S 559X) Prereqs: COM S 352 or CPR E 308, and COM S 486 or CPR E 489 or CPR E 530. Overview of cloud computing models, security and privacy threats in cloud computing related to data and computation outsourcing, theoretical results and practical techniques for secure cloud computing and its applications.

CPR E 560X. Applications of Machine Learning to Security. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with INFAS 560X and COM S 560X). Prereqs: CPR E 531; COM S 474 or Com S 573. Examination of applications of machine learning and big data techniques to various security and privacy problems, and attacks to machine learning algorithms and big data infrastructures as well as their mitigations.


D

DES 259X. Design Field Study. Cr. R. Repeatable. Prereq: Enrollment in or 2 credits of Des 240.
Off-campus tours of areas of interest within the design professions such as design offices, museums, buildings, and neighborhoods. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only. Offered on a satisfactory fail basis only.

DES 330X. Visual Literacy for Design Critique. (3-0) Cr.3. F.S. Prereqs: DSN S 102 or DSN S 183 or 3 credits of ART H or equivalent. Students will learn to interpret, analyze and evaluate visual materials, use images and text effectively to communicate ideas, and understand issues surrounding the creation and use of images and visual media for design critique. Precedent study and critique of sample student design work to understand principles of visual literacy and how to apply them to the presentation of design work. Emphasis on peer-to-peer discussion and in-class participation. Lecture and discussion format.

DIET 526X. Obesity Across the Lifespan. (3-0) Cr. 3 F. Prereq: none. Exploration of the affects that obesity has on public health, the healthcare system, and society in general. Overview of strategies to prevent obesity across the lifespan.

DIET 547X. Functional Foods in Chronic Disease Prevention. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.  Examination of nutritional science, food science, regulatory principles, and nutrient metabolism to understand and explain functional foods, nutraceuticals, and dietary supplements. Additionally students will evaluate the biochemical basis, technologies, legal requirements, and clinical assessment in the marketplace.

DIET 571X. Leadership in Dietetics. (3-0) Cr. 3. SS. This course builds upon leadership theories to develop the fundamental concepts and skills to bridge the gap between theory and practice. Students will be able to successfully evaluate classic and contemporary leadership theories, investigate current leadership trends and identify positive applications in the dietetics community.

DIET 574X. Nutrition and Immunology. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Principles and issues related to nutrition and immunology. Impact of nutrients and nutritional status on immune responses. Impact of disease states on nutritional status.

DIET 598X. Clinical Aspects of Nutrition Support. (3-0). Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Enrollment in GPIDEA - Dietetics program. Specialized nutrition assessment and support. Review of energy expenditure and substrate utilization in specific disease states. Current Methods for the initiation and management of enteral and parenteral nutrition therapy including access, metabolic and mechanical complications. Evaluation of nutrition support methodology in selected disease states.

DSN S 145X. Diversity in Art. (0-1) Cr. 1. S. Discussion on issues of diversity and inclusion utilizing the Art on Campus and University’s Permanent Collection. Topics include ethnic heritage, family background, religious traditions, and interpersonal relationships, with a significant focus on instilling visual analysis skills.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.


E

E C P 320X. Practicum I – Child Observations in Classroom Environments. Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: E C P 201, E C P 202, E C P 305, E C P 306, E C P 307, HD FS 103. Practicum in Early Childhood Education is an opportunity for ECE teacher candidates to have a guided learning experience in a professional agency that provides services to children and families. It is expected that learning experiences and projects at the practicum site will provide teacher candidates with the opportunity to utilize and implement theories and practices learned in other ECE classes.

E C P 322X. Diversity in the Lives of Young Children and Families. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Admission to ECP major. HDFS 102. Exploration of cultural diversity in daily life and beliefs in families with young children. Focus on U.S. families, with attention to the multiple cultures from which they come.

E C P 323X. Working with Families. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Admission to GPIDEA Early Childcare Education and Programming program; HD FS 102. Application of an ecological model to the understanding of variation in parental roles, perspectives, relationships, approaches, and challenges.

E C P 324X. Technology and Young Children. (3-0) Cr. 3 S. Prereqs: Admission to GPIDEA Early Childcare Education and Programming program; HD FS 102. Impact of electronic technology on the development of young children in educational, home, and community environments, and how technology can be used to enhance teaching and learning. Exploration of how to become critical thinkers and informed consumers of technology related to young children.

E C P 412X. Development of Curriculum for Children Ages Birth to Three. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: E C P 201, E C P 202, E C P 305, E C P 306, E C P 307, E C P 320. Curriculum development related to children from birth to age 3: 1) learn and utilize assessment and documentation to inform curriculum, (2) plan and evaluate developmentally appropriate activities, and (3) learn about effective ways to share curriculum information with families. All areas of developmental domains and content areas; issues related to diversity in family composition, culture, and individual abilities will also be addressed.

E C P 413X. Development of Curriculum for Children Ages 4 to 8. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: E C P 201, E C P 202, E C P 305, E C P 306, E C P 307, E C P 320. Development of curriculum for children ages 4 to 8 years: (1) learn and utilize assessment and documentation to inform curriculum, (2) plan and evaluate developmentally appropriate activities, and (3) learn about effective ways to share curriculum information with families. This course addresses all areas of developmental domains and content areas, and issues related to diversity in family composition, culture, and individual abilities will also be addressed.

E C P 424X. Assessing Young Children and Their Environments to Enhance Development. (3-0) Cr. 3 S. Prereqs: E C P 201, E C P 202, E C P 305, E C P 306, E C P 307, E C P 320. Students will learn to select, evaluate, and use appropriate assessment tools for children birth to age 8. Students will use assessment data to inform decisions about teaching (environments and practice) and intervention. There will be an emphasis on the ethical use of assessments, validity of assessments, multicultural sensitivity, and assessments for children with special needs.

E C P 425X. Understanding and Adapting for Developmental Differences. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.  Prepreqs: E C P 201, E C P 202, E C P 305, E C P 306, E C P 307, E C P 320. Knowledge of disability conditions, assessment and identification, interventions in inclusive environments, and collaborations among family members and service providers.

E C P 442X. Administration and Supervision in Early Childhood Settings. (3-0) Cr. 3. SS. Prereq: Admission to ECP major; HDFS 102. Exploration of issues surrounding the administration of early childhood programs including identification of community needs, analysis of business opportunities, the evaluation and appropriate use of space and quality programming, consideration of policy and legal responsibilities, and professionalism in the field. In addition, the course explores best practices in staff selection, training, coaching, and supervision.

E E 208X. Introduction to Bioinstrumentation. (2-3) Cr. 3. F.SS. (Cross-listed with B M E 208X). Prereqs: MATH 165. Fundamental, laboratory intensive course in bio-instrumentation with an emphasis on acquiring and analyzing biomedical signals to obtain relevant information. Topics covered include an overview of basic medical measurement systems, labs illustrating data acquisition from different body systems, and an introduction to statistical analysis and its relationship to biological variability.

E E 333X. Electronic Systems Design. (3-3) Cr. 4. F. Prereqs: EE 230 CprE 288 (co-requisite). Further topics in electronic systems design: Use of sensors and actuators. High-power amplifying and switching components. Linear and switched-mode power supplies. Linear and switched-mode amplifiers. Interfacing electronic components with programmable microcontrollers. Printed circuit board technology and design tools. Laboratory exercises and design projects incorporating printed circuit technology.

E E 436X. Physics of Transistors. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: E E 332. Use of energy band diagrams to describe the behavior of junction devices, electron and hole currents in transistors, junction capacitance, parasitic and second-order effects, development of circuit models from the underlying physical behavior, heterojunction devices, high-speed and high-power applications, measurement techniques.

E E 437X. Electronic Properties of Materials. (3-0) Cr. 3 S. (Cross-listed with M S E 437X) (Dual-listed with E E 537X) Prereq: E E 332 or MAT E 317 or PHYS 322. Review of classical and quantum mechanical descriptions of electrons in solids, band theory, metallic conduction, lattice vibrations, semiconductors, semiconductor devices, dielectrics, polarization, dielectric relaxation, crystal anisotropy, ferroelectricity, piezoelectricity, superconductivity, magnetism, device applications.

E E 450X. Biosensors. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., even-numbered years. (Cross-listed with B M E 450X.) Prereq: B M E 220. Overview of biosensors and bioanalytical challenges; designing for performance including various analytical problems, ion-selective membranes, characteristics of enzymes and basics of bioaffinity sensing; fundamentals of bioselective layers including depositing films and membranes, surfaces for immobilization and bioselective agents; survey of different biosensing technologies including electroanalytical, biomembrane, optical, and acoustic-wave based sensors.

E E 489X. Survey of Remote Sensing Technologies (Same as GEOL 489X, NREM 489X, MTEOR 489X) (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: Four courses in physical or biological sciences or engineering. Electromagnetic radiation principles, active and passive sensors, multispectral and hyperspectral sensors, imaging radar, SAR, thermal imaging, lidar. Examples of applications.

E E 522X. Cognitive Radio Networks. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with CPR 522X). Prereq: Instructor approval. Topics on cognitive radio networks: Cognitive Radio Networks Architecture; Software Defined Radio Architecture; Spectrum Sensing; Spectrum Management; Spectrum Sharing; Spectrum Mobility; Applications of Cognitive Radio Networks.

E E 525X. Data Analytics in Electrical and Computer Engineering. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: E E 322 or equivalent. Introduction to a variety of data analytics techniques -- particularly those relevant for electrical and computer engineers -- from a foundational perspective. Topics to be covered include techniques for classification, visualization, and parameter estimation, with applications to signals, images, matrices, and graphs. Emphasis will be placed on rigorous analysis as well as principled design of such techniques.

E E 537X. Electronic Properties of Materials. (3-0) Cr. 3 S. (Cross-listed with M S E 437X) (Dual-listed with E E 537X) Prereq: E E 332 or MAT E 317 or PHYS 322. Review of classical and quantum mechanical descriptions of electrons in solids, band theory, metallic conduction, lattice vibrations, semiconductors, semiconductor devices, dielectrics, polarization, dielectric relaxation, crystal anisotropy, ferroelectricity, piezoelectricity, superconductivity, magnetism, device applications.

E E 341X. BioMEMS and Nanotechnology. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with B M E 341X.) Prereq: B M E 220. Overview of Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) technologies for bioengineering, fundamentals of microfluidic device design, fabrication, and characterization, survey of microfluidic functional building blocks for lab-on-a-chip applications including mixers, valves, channels, and chambers. Topics of nanotechnology in bioengineering, nanoscale building block technologies for bioengineering including self-assembling, surface chemical treatment, nano-imprinting, nano-particles, nano-tubes, nano-wires, and stimuli-responsive biomaterials.

E E 589X. Survey of Remote Sensing Technologies (Same as GEOL 589X, NREM 589X, MTEOR 589X) (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: Four courses in physical or biological sciences or engineering. Electromagnetic radiation principles, active and passive sensors, multispectral and hyperspectral sensors, imaging radar, SAR, thermal imaging, lidar. Examples of applications.

E M 567X. Nanomechanics of Materials. (2-1) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with AER E 567X, M S E 567X). Prereq: E M 566 or permission of instructor. Continuum approaches to material deformation and nanostructure evolution. Thermodynamics and kinetics. Nucleation and growth. Large strain formulation. Surface and interface tension and phenomena. Chemical reactions, phase transformations, and dislocations.

ECON 335X. The Economics of Global Agricultural Food & Bio-energy. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with GLOBE 335X) Prereq: ECON 101.  Applied economics analysis of the determinants of world agricultural production, marketing, and use in feed, food, fiber, biofuel, and other applications, and global food processing and consumption. Analysis of market case studies and various data on global agriculture production and transformation, land and resource use, demography, economic activity, nutrition and health trends.

ECON 495X. Economics Domestic Travel Course. Cr. 1-3. Prereq: sophomore status. Permission of instructor. Tour and study of domestic businesses, markets, and economic institutions located outside Iowa to expose students to the diversity of activities within the U.S. economy. Pre-trip sessions arranged. Locations and duration of tours will vary.

EDADM 651X. Ethics, Spirituality, & Social Justice in Administrative Practice. Cr. 3. Alt. SS, offered 2012. This course explores ethical models and practice of educational administrators. Participants develop personal and professional codes of ethics: define concepts of care, spirituality, democracy, equity, diversity, and social justice; and explain how those concepts relate to students’ academic and social success. Case studies offer opportunities to consider moral and legal consequences of decision-making. Participants develop their own vision of leadership.

EL PS 601X. Foundations of Educational Inquiry. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Admission to PhD Program in the School of Education. Foundational course for PhD students in Higher Education programs. Introduction for first-year PhD students to the landscape of scholarship in the field of education while initiating a process of helping doctoral students develop a reflexive stance toward educational inquiry so that they may engage in methodologically rigorous, substantively rich, and socially meaningfully work in the field of education. Presented within the higher education context, presenting and discussing scholarly work that comes from within this context. Practitioner as researcher and philosophical belief that higher education leaders must view their context through a scholarly lens.

ENGL 214X. Introduction to Technical Communication. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: ENGL 150. A broad introduction to the culture of professional work as a technical communicator, with particular emphasis on principles and best practices for developing and managing technical information and digital media. Examination of user-centered design, the history of the discipline, cross-cultural communication, and the ethics of communicating complex information to lay audiences. Study and practice of team-based collaboration, project management, and technical editing.

ENGL 270X. Science in Public: Communication, Controversy & Understanding. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with SP CM 270X and JL MC 270X.) Prereq: ENGL 250. Models of communication between scientists, engineers and other professionals and the public. Approaches to public engagement with science and technology including analysis of science communication on controversial topics such as climate change, evolution, and genetically modified organisms.

ENGL 319X. Studies in Language and Diversity. (3-0) Cr. 3 F. (Cross-listed with LING 319X). Prereq: ENGL 250. Special topics related to the role of language and linguistics in US diversity, such as Dialects and American literature, American English Accents, Legal and Social Aspects of English-only Laws in the US. Connections between language use and social diversity.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

ENGL 320X. Topics in Linguistic Structure. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with LING 320X.) Prereqs: ENGL/LING 219, 220.  Special topics related to the study of linguistic structure. Focus on language structure in areas not covered in detail by existing courses. Topics include field linguistics, morphology, forensic linguistics, neurolinguistics, semantics, non-English phonology, acoustic phonetics, linguistic universals, and historical linguistics.

ENGL 322X. Language and Society. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with LING)  Prereq: ENGL/LING 219.  Introduction to variation in language use in society. Survey of factors affecting language use including background characteristics of language users, location, and purpose of interaction in addition to institutional, state and national language policies.

ENGL 325X. Teaching Methods for ESL Learners: Oral Communication Skills. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with LING)  Prereq: ENGL/LING 219. Issues and methods in teaching oral communication skills (listening, speaking, pronunciation) to English as a second language (ESL) learners. The nature of oral language ability. Materials and Methods for developing oral communication skills at middle school, high school, and adult contexts.

ENGL 516X. Methods of Formal Linguistic Analysis. Cr. 3. S. (Same as LING). Prereq: ENGL/LING 219 or equivalent. Data and knowledge structures for formal representation of natural language and speech data. Designing and implementing algorithms for automating linguistic analysis tasks. Conceptual issues for natural lajnguage and speech processing programming.

ENGL 561X. Methods for Scholarship in Literature and the Humanities. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Graduate classification or 6 credits in literature. Intensive study of research methods and perspectives concerning the study of literature and the humanities. Introduction to resources and techniques of research, the structure of academic articles, and strategies for argument in academic communication. Students will work on a range of genres that may include, but are not limited to, seminar paper, thesis prospectus, book review, conference paper, and critical essay.

ENGR 121X. Learning Skills for Engineering. (0-1) R Credit. F. Exploration of personal and academic strategies that promote academic and career success.

ENGR 155X. Leadership in Engineering Student Organizations. (1-0) Cr. 1. S. Development of leadership skills of student organization leaders in the College of Engineering. Introduction to organizational leadership concepts and analyze organization purpose and function. Students practice mentoring and learn how their campus leadership experiences transfer to the field of engineering.

ENGR 250X. Leadership in Engineering Teams. (1-0) Cr. 1. F. Building and sustaining decision-making engineering teams. Students will explore the interrelated processes of discerning purpose, thinking systemically, developing reflective judgment, and exercising leadership by mobilizing and setting the direction for adaptive change within a team. Industry based examples and information from engineering and natural resource sciences will be infused into the course.

ENSCI 204X. Applied Exploration of Environmental Science I. (2-0) Cr.1. S. Prereq: ENSCI 203; or permission of instructor. Applied exploration of selected environmental topics including water quality; stormwater regulation and management; how agriculture affects water quality, air quality, and soils; the history and application of environmental policy in the United States. Experiential learning component. Offered satisfactory-fail only.

ENSCI 205X. Applied Exploration of Environmental Science II. (2-0) Cr.1. S. Prereq: ENSCI 204X; or permission of instructor. Continued exploration of environmental topics including storm water policy and management, in-depth team-based research on environmental topics leading to a capstone research project. Experiential learning component. Offered satisfactory-fail only.

ENSCI 370X. GIS for Ecology and Environmental Science. Cr. Var. 1-6. F. (Same as BIOL 370X.Prereq: Six credits in biological and /or physical sciences, and permission of instructor. Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) with emphasis on ecological and environmental applications. No prior GIS experience required. Guided, individualized study of topics based on student background and interest. For students with prior experience, topics and activities are selected to build upon any previous experience and minimize duplication to previous GIS coursework. Potential topics include: basic concepts of GIS, data structures, database management, spatial analysis, modeling and visualization of ecological and environmental data. Case studies in ecological and environmental applications using ArcGIS. May be taken more than once for credit.

ENT 214X. Insects in Forensic Science. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Introduction to the use of insects as evidence in court and how they can assist in solving crimes. Topics covered include basic insect biology, systematics, behavior, with emphasis on applications of forensic entomology.

ENT 220X. Introduction to Forensic Science. (3-0) Cr. 3 F. Study of fundamental forensic science techniques and procedures covering types of physical, chemical, and biological evidence and how this information is used in the legal system. Assessment of crime scenes and various forensic specialties will be introduced.

ENT 270L. Mosquito Surveillance and Curation. (0-3) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: BIOL 101 or BIOL 211. Mosquito biology, identification, rearing, trapping, museum curation of specimens, theory of vector control and molecular testing techniques. Collection required.

ENT 358X. Bee biology, management, and beekeeping. (2-0) Cr. 2. F. (Cross-listed with BIOL 358X) Prereq: Permission of an instructor. Biology and management of bee pollinators, focusing on honey bees. Fundamentals of bee biology, including life history, behavior, and development. Practical aspects of beekeeping and non-honey bee pollinator management, including disease management, pollination, and honey production. Working with live bee hives and demonstration of practical beekeeping skills will occur during three weekend trips to local hives.

ENV S 298X. Iowa Rivers: Learn and Serve Seminar. (Cross-listed with NREM 298X.) (0-1) Cr. 1. S. Introduction to basic outdoor skills needed to enjoy the rivers as well as environmental principles necessary to understand waterways and how they are impacted by human activities. Preparation for a week-long service-learning activity.

ENV S 299X. Iowa Rivers: Service Learning. (Cross-listed with NREM 299X) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: NREM 298X. Service learning project to clean an Iowa river and gather information that will be used in an educational activity that combines recreation and environmental stewardship.

ENV S 471X. Global Environmental History. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with HIST 471X). Prereqs: Either one of HIST 201, 202, or 207; or 3 credits of Environmental Studies. Survey of the interactions of human communities with their environments from the beginnings of human history to the present. Topics include the domestication of animals, the agricultural revolution, industrialization, urbanization, deforestation, hydraulic management, fossil fuel consumption, and climate change.

F

FIN 391X. MicroFinance Seminar. (.5-.5) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: FIN 301. Introduction to microfinance activities around the world with special focus on microfinance initiatives in Iowa. Lectures by experts in the field of microfinance will introduce multiple dimensions surrounding microfinance, providing an understanding of microfinance, its efficacy, and possible forms that could be applied within a developed country setting. Students will gain an understanding of how microfinance is used as a tool to alleviate poverty, promote local economic development, and raise the standard of living among the economically disadvantaged segments of community. Students will have opportunities to directly interact with local microfinance institutions as well as with micro-entrepreneurs.

FIN 474X. Real Estate Investment. (3-0). Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: FIN 301, FIN 371.  Introduction to theories and methods of investment analysis applied to real estate. Studies cash flow analysis, alternative measures of investment performance, the impact of the financing decision on real estate investment risks and return, and various real estate financing techniques. Covers cases involving more complex financing and capital markets tools used in real estate.

FIN 476X. Applied Real Estate Analysis. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: STAT 326, and ECON 301 or FIN 301. This course will present applied empirical methods commonly employed in real estate analysis such as the construction and use of price indexes, hedonic methods of property valuation and discrete choice models. Rural and urban property valuation methods will be emphasized, and the determinants of ownership, investment and financing choice will be investigated. Specific applications to residential, commercial and agricultural markets will be undertaken.

FS HN 260X. Introduction to Controversies in Science and Society. (Same as AN S 260X, NREM 260X.)  (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Introduction to evaluating controversial and multifaceted issues in natural resource management, animal science, and food science. Critically examine stakeholders’ beliefs, values, and ethics, while determining the credibility of information sources. Case studies and team-based activities.

FS HN 477X. Fundamentals of Packaging. (2-3) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: CHEM 163 or 177; CHEM 178, BIOL 212, ENGL 250, MATH 160, MATH 165 or MATH 181, PHYS 115 or 111 STAT 101,104 or 105. The study of materials, design, processes, performance and safety of packaging. Applied experiences include: packaging design, fabrication and performance testing for packaged products.

FS HN 567X. Global Nutrition. (3-0) Cr. 3 F. (Cross-listed with NUTRS 567X) Prereq: Graduate standing for NUTRS 567X; Undergraduates may enroll with instructor permission. Global nutrition issues, including the epidemiology, etiology, sociocultural and economic context, and program and policy responses to topics. Students will research country-specific issues such as malnutrition, growth stunting, micronutrient deficiencies, sanitation, and obesity and chronic disease.

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