Experimental Courses 2016-2017, A-F

A B C D E F


A B E 102X. Learning Communities. (0-1) Cr. 0.5. F. Eight week learning communities course focusing on student success, engineering, and department curriculum. Building community within the ABE Department.

A ECL 231X. Principles of Wildlife & Fisheries Management. (3-0) Cr.3. S. Prereqs: BIOL 211, BIOL 212, NREM 120. Introduction to the principles of wildlife and fisheries management. Case studies will be explored along with assessment methods used to understand management including conservation of populations, species and communities, as well as habitat preservation and restoration.

ACCT 315X. Business Data Streams and Issues. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with MIS 315X.) Prereq: COM S 113. Identification of open data sources and other private data sources. Develop methods of data access, collection, and sharing; develop methods to validate and standardize data sources; develop methods to assess data worthiness (risk).

ACCT 489X. Corporate Social Responsibility Reporting (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Dual-listed withn ACCT 589X.) Prereqs: ACCT 386 or 501. Examines the theory and practice of social and environmental reporting, the role of the corporation in society, and the mechanisms by which society might hold corporations accountable for their actions.

ACCT 589X. Corporate Social Responsibility Reporting (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Dual-listed withn ACCT 489X.) Prereqs: ACCT 386 or 501. Examines the theory and practice of social and environmental reporting, the role of the corporation in society, and the mechanisms by which society might hold corporations accountable for their actions.

AER E 294X. Make to Innovate I. (1-0) Cr. 1. F. Prereqs: Restricted to Freshman and Sophomore classifications, Instructor permission required. Multidisciplinary projects to engage students in the fundamentals of engineering, project management, systems engineering, teamwork, and oral and visual communication. Students will define and attain their team objectives and milestones that are approved by the instructor. Graduation Restrictions: Will not count toward graduation.

AER E 407X/507X. Applied Formal Methods. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with COM S 407X/507X.) Prereq: MATH 166 and instructor permission. Introduction to the fundamentals of formal methods, a set of mathematically rigorous techniques for the formal specification, validation, and verification of safety-critical systems. Tools, techniques, and applications of formal methods with an emphasis on real-world use-cases such as enabling autonomous operation. Students will build experience in writing mathematically analyzable specifications from English operational concepts for real systems, such as aircraft and spacecraft. Review capabilities and limitations of formal methods in the design, verification, and system health management of today's complex systems.

AER E 426X. Advanced Topics in Aerospace Structural Design. (2-2) Cr. 2. F. (Dual-listed with AER E 526X.) Advanced topics in the design and analysis of aerospace structures. Topics related to the material selection, composite materials, strength and durability, riveted, bolted, and adhesive joining, and manufacturability, will be discussed. Large flexible space structures and non-linear aspects of structural design will be discussed. Group project will be assigned.

AER E 429X. Penetrating Radiation Methods in Nondestructive Evaluation. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: PHYS 222.  Spectrum of electromagnetic waves, wave/particle dualism, generation and detection of electromagnetic radiation, reflection/ penetration/ absorption/ scattering of electromagnetic radiation, application of penetrating radiation (x- and gamma rays), imaging, computed tomography, diffraction, small angle scattering, materials characterization.

AER E 482X. Introduction to Metrology and Testing. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: MATH 265 or 266 or 267. Fundamentals of metrology and testing, system of units, history of metrology, principles and organization of metrology, planning of experiments, data analysis, measurement uncertainties, statistic error analysis, confidence interval, measurement of:“length, mass, time, electric current, temperature, amount of substance, luminous intensity, pressure”, transducers, cameras, sensor systems, analog and digital signal processing, image processing, measurement of materials properties (mechanical, terminal, electric, magnetic, optic), testing of materials performance (corrosion, friction, wear, etc.) 

AER E 483X. Aeroacoustics. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Dual-listed with AER E 583X). Prereqs: AER E 311 or M E 335; and MATH 266 or MATH 267. Noise metrics, Linear wave equation and its solution in 1-, 2-, and 3-D using Green's functions. Propagation of sound in free and confined spaces. Aerodynamic noise sources in engineering machines: aircraft engine noise, airfram noise, wind turbine noise, etc.

AER E 494X. Make to Innovate II. Cr. 2-3. F. Prereqs: Restricted to Junior or Senior classifications, Instructor permission required. Multidisciplinary projects to engage students in the fundamentals of engineering, project management, systems engineering, teamwork, and oral and visual communication. Students will define and attain their team objectives and milestones that are approved by their instructors. Graduation restrictions: Maximum of 6 credits may count toward graduation as Technical Elective.

AER E 526X. Advanced Topics in Aerospace Structural Design. (2-2) Cr. 2. F. (Dual-listed with AER E 426X.) Advanced topics in the design and analysis of aerospace structures. Topics related to the material selection, composite materials, strength and durability, riveted, bolted, and adhesive joining, and manufacturability, will be discussed. Large flexible space structures and non-linear aspects of structural design will be discussed. Group project will be assigned.

AER E 554X. Metaheuristic Optimization and Modeling for Complex System Design. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Graduate standing in College of Engineering or permission of instructor. Introduction to the theoretical foundation and methods associated with meta-modeling and metaheuristic optimization, including categories of meta-modeling methods and applications in which each class of meta-modeling methods should and could be used, as well as metaheuristic optimization methods and the types of applications for which each is best suited.

AER E 583X. Aeroacoustics. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Dual-listed with AER E 483X). Prereqs: AER E 311 or M E 335; and MATH 266 or MATH 267. Noise metrics, Linear wave equation and its solution in 1-, 2-, and 3-D using Green's functions. Propagation of sound in free and confined spaces. Aerodynamic noise sources in engineering machines: aircraft engine noise, airfram noise, wind turbine noise, etc.

AESHM 180NX. Freshman Field Study: Apparel, Merchandising, and Design. (.5-1) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: Enrollment in AESHM Learning Community (Common Threads) - Member or Peer Mentor; Permission of Instructor. Study of and tours of regional areas of interest to apparel majors in the AESHM Department. Trip to regional location under supervision of faculty member. Locations vary, 2-3 day trip. Journal entries and final report/analysis are required.

AGEDS 115X. Seminar in Agricultural and Life Sciences Education. (1-0) Cr.1. F. Prereqs: Major in AgEdS Department; Permission of the Instructor. Specialized seminar in agricultural and life sciences education focused on agricultural science education, leadership and/or communications.

AGEDS 517X. Student Teacher Education Practicum. Cr. 2-6. F. Prereqs: AGEDS 590B, AGEDS 501, AGEDS 502. Admission to the University Teacher Education program. Supervised 5th-12th grade public and private schools teaching practicum for graduate students in Masters degree teacher certification program.

AGRON 270X. Geospatial Technologies. (2-2) Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with ENSCI 270X). Concepts and tools for acquiring, managing, analyzing, and displaying geographic information, including GIS, remote sensing, spatial analysis, and cartography. Focus on applications in biological, ecological, environmental, and agricultural sciences.

AGRON 540X. Numerical Weather and Climate Prediction. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: MATH 265 or equivalent and at least one course in atmospheric or fluid dynamics. Numerical solutions of the differential equations that describe weather and climate. Survey of numerical solution techniques with focus on advantages and limitations of different methods. Physical parameterizations for turbulence, clouds, and land surface processes. Forecast verification.

AM IN 225X. American Indians of Iowa . (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with ANTHR 225X.) Cultures and histories of Native people who have called the present state of Iowa home; primary focus on the period between 1700 CE and the present; Native interactions with Spanish, French, British, and American people.

A M D 329X. Digital Textile Printing for Apparel Design. (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: A M D 321 and A M D 325. Overview of the use of digital printing in the textile and apparel industry, color matching, repeat print patterns, engineered prints, and creation of apparel prototypes.

A M D 525X. Experimental Patternmaking. (2-4) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: AMD 121 or equivalent, AMD 225 or equivalent, AMD 510 or taking concurrently, permission of instructor.  Research, analyze, and apply experimental patternmaking techniques to original garments suitable for entry into a juried competition/exhibitions. Compare, contrast, and organize a framework of research patternmaking principles through content analysis or other appropriate research techniques. Documentation of learning and design process.

A M D 554X. Dress History Research Methods. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Using a variety of sources and methods of analysis, students will develop their ability to read and interpret primary and secondary sources and to understand the methodology underpinnings and process of constructing dress history.

AN S 228X. Laboratory Animal Science. (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: AN S 101, ANS 114; recommended: ANS 214. Introduction to the species, uses, biology, facilities, care, and diseases of animals used in research.

AN S 427X. Beef Cow-Calf Systems Management. (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: AN S 226, AN S 270, AN S 320, AN S 331, AN S 352; and ECON 230 or equivalent. Decisions facing the administrator of a beef cow-calf enterprise. Financial and production goal identification, problem clarification, and resource allocation to manage the cow-calf enterprise. Computer-aided study. Only one of AN S 427X or AN S 426 may count toward the AN S 400 level enterprise management requirement.

AN S 563X. Advanced Processed Meats Technology . (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: An S 270 or equivalent, or at least two undergraduate courses in biology, food science, microbiology or culinology. Physical, chemical and biological properties of meat important to processed meat product characteristics. Ingredients, technology and equipment used for fresh and cured meat products. Packaging, preservation and food safety issues critical to processed meat products are emphasized.

ANTHR 225X. American Indians of Iowa. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with AM IN 225X.) Cultures and histories of Native people who have called the present state of Iowa home; primary focus on the period between 1700 CE and the present; Native interactions with Spanish, French, British, and American people.

ARABC 375X. Arabic Culture. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Survey of contemporary Arabic culture in the Middle East and North Africa as reflected in history, language, the arts, and social institutions with attention to the Arab Diaspora. Taught in English.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

ARCH 439X. Computational Design Theory . (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Dual-listed with Arch 539X.) Prereqs: Junior Classification. What is the role of the human designer when automation, simulation, and other computationally-driven processes enter into the picture? This seminar approaches such questions from the perspective of architecture and design, supplemented with multidisciplinary readings from mathematics, cognitive science, computer science, evolutionary biology, and philosophy. Students will cultivate a sense of what is possible with new technologies, and to begin to articulate a position -- a theory or theories -- of how humans and computers will design together in the future. Participation required in class discussions and constructive debates.

ARCH 521X. Celluloid Cities: Urbanism in Film. (1-2) Cr. 3. F. Examines the urban condition as it is revealed in film. Lectures will introduce and offer a social and art historical context for each showing, as well as introduce the primary urban strategies evoked. Students will be required to complete as a term project the creation of a 5-minute film regarding urban instances.

ARCH 531X. Drawing Culture. (3-1) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Junior classification. Exploration of theories and practices that center on drawing as a fundamental means of knowing. Development of critical thinking and communication skills with respect to the history and theory of drawing in architecture and critical insight into drawing methodology. Culture of drawing and the drawing of culture simultaneously in architecture as a discursive venue. Students will produce a drawing as part of the class.

ARCH 539X. Computational Design Theory . (3-0) Cr. 3 S. (Dual-listed with Arch 439X.) Prereqs: Graduate classification. What is the role of the human designer when automation, simulation, and other computationally-driven processes enter into the picture? This seminar approaches such questions from the perspective of architecture and design, supplemented with multidisciplinary readings from mathematics, cognitive science, computer science, evolutionary biology, and philosophy. Students will cultivate a sense of what is possible with new technologies, and to begin to articulate a position -- a theory or theories -- of how humans and computers will design together in the future. Participation required in class discussions and constructive debates. Final project is a research paper.

ARTGR 383X . A Concise History of Graphics and Sports. (3-0) Cr.3. S. This introduction to basic concepts of branding in design explores the processes of sports, graphics of sports, design criteria of sport objects, consumer trends, and social importance of sports will be discussed. This course takes a historical perspective of sport graphics and objects starting at the first known understanding of what could be considered “Sport,” from ancient times to the present. Interpretation of sport graphics and sport objects. Measuring the sports impact and associated graphics with emotions; sounds that date the sport or strengthen our memories of them, photographs of objects and people from different periods, images of industrial, sport, agrarian and city landscapes to remind us of the dominant role played by sport/graphics or that sport object in the country of its origin.

ARTGR 463X. 3D Motion Graphics. Cr. 3. SS. (Dual-listed with ARTGR 563X). Prereqs: Concurrent enrollment in ARTGR 370, ARTGR 371, or ARTGR 470. 3D visualization in a Motion Graphics context. Emphasis on design in 3D computer animation as it relates to various electronic media.

ARTGR 497X. Graphic Design Field Study. Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Acceptance to the undergraduate or graduate programs in graphic design. Introduction to places related to graphic design in urban environments such as museums and design studios. Culture and context of design in the urban environment.

ARTGR 510X. Graphic Design Theory. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: graduate enrollment in College of Design or permission of instructor. Graphic design as a tool to represent and create imageability in the mind of the audience, through relevant readings in graphic design theory and principles of visual organization in various media.

ARTGR 511X. Graduate Graphic Design Studio I. (0-6) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: graduate enrollment in the Graphic Design Graduate Program, or instructor permission. Introduction to a range of research topics, methods and ideas that are predicated on learning through the process of creation.

ARTGR 512X. Audience and Perception. (0-6) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Graduate enrollment in Graphic Design or permission of instructor. Theory and investigation of systems, structures, principles of visual organization for communication through the experimental application of traditional and non-traditional media. Studio problems will be influenced by social, cultural, environmental, or technological factors.

ARTGR 520X. Design & Cultural Semiotics. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: Introduction to semiotics as it relates to art, design and culture. Historical and contemporary vantage points and the importance of designers as makers of meaning. Key concepts of semiotics and the interrelationship between message, meaning, design and culture.

ARTGR 521X. Graphic Design Graduate Studio II. Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: Graduate enrollment in the Graphic Design Graduate Program. In this advanced graduate graphic design studio led by a variety of faculty, students will be introduced to a range of research topics, methods and ideas that are predicated on learning through the process of creation.

ARTGR 522X. Critical Media. (0-6) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Graduate enrollment in the Graphic Design Graduate Program. Advanced theory and investigation of critical media and application of principles of visual organization for communication. Through hypothetical design work with critical media tools, studio problems will examine and be informed by social, cultural, environmental, or technological factors.

ARTGR 563X. 3D Motion Graphics. Cr. 3. SS. (Dual-listed with ARTGR 463X). Prereqs: Concurrent enrollment in ARTGR 370, ARTGR 371, or ARTGR 470. 3D visualization in a Motion Graphics context. Emphasis on design in 3D computer animation as it relates to various electronic media.

ARTID 254X. Therapeutic Implications of Design. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Overview of design’s potential for preventing, stopping, moderating or reversing certain adverse cognitive, emotional, behavioral and physical consequences of life in modern times. Introduction to sources of harm in the designed environment and methods for identifying their presence and impact. Discussion and exercises aimed at guiding future design applications to their fullest beneficial potential.

ARTIS 432X. Sequential Narrative Drawing. (Dual-listed with ARTIS 532X) (0-6) Cr.3. S. Prereqs: ARTIS 330 or permission of instructor after portfolio review for undergraduate students; graduate classification and permission of instructor after portfolio review for graduate students. A studio course in drawing focusing on the fundamentals of communicating a narrative through sequential images. Applications include concept art for graphic novels, children’s books, comic strips, video games, storyboarding for live action and animated films including instructional and marketing applications, plus character and scene development.

ARTIS 462X. Community-Engaged Arts Management. (3-1) Cr. 2. F. Introduction to aspects of community arts management and art gallery operations. Class meets at ISU Design on Main Gallery, a community arts space in the Main Street Cultural District of Ames. Students will staff the gallery and assist in the conception, design and realization of exhibitions.

ARTIS 475X. Interactive Art. (Dual-listed with ARTIS 575X.) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: ARTIS 212 or permission of instructor; graduate credit: graduate level standing. Create software and integrate the sensors required to create interactive artworks, videos, games, and installations. Prominent examples in the history of interactive art provides context for the coursework.

ARTIS 532X. Sequential Narrative Drawing. (Dual-listed with ARTIS 432X) (0-6) Cr.3. S. Prereqs: ARTIS 330 or permission of instructor after portfolio review for undergraduate students; graduate classification and permission of instructor after portfolio review for graduate students. A studio course in drawing focusing on the fundamentals of communicating a narrative through sequential images. Applications include concept art for graphic novels, children’s books, comic strips, video games, storyboarding for live action and animated films including instructional and marketing applications, plus character and scene development.

ARTIS 575X. Interactive Art. (Dual-listed with ARTIS 475X.) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: ARTIS 212 or permission of instructor; graduate credit: graduate level standing. Create software and integrate the sensors required to create interactive artworks, videos, games, and installations. Prominent examples in the history of interactive art provides context for the coursework.

ASL 107X. Introduction to the Deaf-World. (1-0) Cr. 1 F. Nature and significance of the Deaf-World as a cultural and linguistic minority.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

ASL 305X. ASL Classifiers and Depiction. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: ASL 205. Focused analysis, documentation, discussion, and increased development of classifiers and depiction in ASL. Investigation in how these grammatical features are deliberately incorporated into conversational, presentational, scientific, and artistic language production.

ASL 325X. Deaf Peoples: Pre-World War II. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.  Prereqs: ASL 206 or instructor's permission. Perspectives on and treatment of deaf people as individuals and groups prior to World War II. Taught in American Sign Language.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

B

BBMB 110X. Biochemistry Learning Community Orientation. (1-0) Cr. 1 F. Prereqs: Co-enrollment with BBMB 101 highly recommended. Overview of the program of study, academic planning, resources on campus for the successful transition to Iowa State, team‐building, leadership, and community‐focused activities. Intended for members of the Biochemistry, Biophysics and Agricultural Biochemistry learning community.

BBMB 111X . Biochemistry Learning Community. (1-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Enrollment in BBMB102 is highly recommended. Overview of career-building and research resources within BBMB and across ISU, including internships, lab skills, independent research, and leadership opportunities. For members of the Biochemistry & Biophysics Learning Community.

BBMB 120X. The Biochemistry of Beer. (2-0) Cr. 2. F. (Cross-listed with FS HN 120X.) An introduction to the major classes of biomolecules, basic biochemical concepts, enzymology, metabolism and the genetic engineering as they apply to the production and flavor of beer. All aspects of biochemistry of beer will be covered, including the malting of barley, starch conversion, yeast fermentation, and the chemical changes that occur during the aging of beer. Intended for nonmajors. Natural science majors limited to elective credit only.

BBMB 121X. Medicines, Drugs and You. (2-0) Cr. 2. F. Prereqs: One year of high school chemistry or CHEM 50 and biology. An introduction to how medicines treat disease, what drug molecules look like, how they function, how they can be toxic, modern therapeutics ranging from over-the-counter pain relievers, antibiotics and anti-depressants, to anti-cancer chemotherapies, a discussion of illegal drugs from toxicity to mechanism of action and potential therapeutic benefits. Intended for students of all majors.

BBMB 510X. Molecular Biology and Biochemistry of RNA. (2-0) Cr. 2. F. Prereq: BIOL 313, BBMB 405, BBMB 502, or Gen 409, or equivalent. Biochemical processes that define structure and function of nucleic acids.  Emphasis on the molecular processes that take place during synthesis, processing, and function of different RNA species; review of recent advances in RNA research.

BBMB 512X. Principles of Glycobiology.  (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereq: 3 credits in Organic Chemistry. Structure, synthesis, and functions of glycans, glycoproteins, glycolipids, and glycosylated secondary metabolites in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Fundamental role of glycans in living organisms along with the most advanced techniques used for their characterization. Biotechnological applications of glycans and glycoconjugates for human needs.

BBMB 531X. Plant Biochemistry. (2-0) Cr.2. S. Prereqs: BBMB 301 or equivalent. In-depth exploration of plant biochemistry with a focus on the unique aspects of plants versus heterotrophic organisms. Analysis of unique pathways, metabolic trafficking between unique organelles and tissues, and techniques for their characterization.

BBMB 532X. Enzyme Kinetics and Mechanisms. (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereq: BBMB 504. Advanced concepts of enzyme kinetics and catalysis. Experimental methods for determining kinetic and chemical reaction mechanisms. Enzyme structure/function relationships and the role of dynamics in catalysis.

BBMB 551X. Computational Biochemistry. (2-0) Cr. 2. F. Prereq: BBMB 404 or equivalent. Biological and structural databases, molecular visualization, sequence comparisons, homology searches, sequence motifs, construction of phylogenetic trees, structure comparisons, protein structure predictions, RNA structure predictions, molecular docking, metabolic pathways

BBMB 553X. Current Research in Chemical and Physical Biology. (2-0) Cr. 2. F.  Prereqs: BBMB 404 or equivalent. Principles and applications of chemical and physical methods to analyze biological structures and function ranging from cells to individual biomolecules. Synthetic and biosynthetic strategies, cell surface engineering, single molecule and super-resolution spectroscopy and imaging, membrane biophysics, and use of nuclear magnetic resonance.

BCB 546X. Computational Skills for Biological Data . (1-2) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with EEOB 546X.) Prereqs: Graduate student status or permission of the instructor. Computational skills necessary for biologists working with big data sets. UNIX commands, scripting in R and Python, version control using Git and GitHub, and use of high performance computing clusters. Combination of lectures and computational exercises.

BCB 585X. Fundamentals of Predictive Plant Phenomics. (3-3) Cr. 4. F. (Cross-listed with GDCB 585X and M E 585X.) Prereqs: Acceptance into the P3 program or instructor permission. Principles of engineering, data analysis, and plant sciences and their interplay applied to predictive plant phenomics. Transport phenomena, sensor design, image analysis, graph models, network data analysis, fundamentals of genomics and phenomics. Multidisciplinary laboratory exercises.

BIOL 357X. Biology of Plants. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: BIOL 211 and BIOL 212; BIOL 211L and 212L recommended. Study of the general biology of plants, including plant cells and functions, basic anatomy of tissues, meristems, and organs; adaptive morphological features. Review of processes of photosynthesis, respiration, basic plant metabolic functions, and plant reproduction. Survey of evolutionary aspects of all major groups of land plants, and relationships of plants to their environment. Intended for Biology and other life science undergraduate majors.

BIOL 483X. Environmental Biogeochemistry. (3-0) Cr. 3. (Dual-listed with ENSCI/GEOL 483X.) (Cross-listed with ENSCI/GEOLl/EEOB 583X.) Prereqs: Combined 12 credits in biology, chemistry, and physics. Biological, physical, and geochemical controls on elemental cycling in the Earth system. Dynamics of global change and anthropogenic perturbations to global biogeochemical cycles. Biotic and abiotic cycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, metals, and water, and impacts of anthropogenic perturbations on these cycles across spatiotemporal scales. Application of box models and principles of mass balance, kinetics, thermodynamics, and stable isotopes to analyze and predict system behavior.

B M E 450X. Biosensors. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with E E 450X) Prereqs: B M E 220. Overview of biosensors and bioanalytical challenges; designing for performance including various analytical problems, ion-selective membranes, characteristics of enzymes and basics of bioaffinity sensing; fundamentals of bioselective layers including depositing films and membranes, surfaces for immobilization and bioselective agents; survey of different biosensing technologies including electroanalytical, biomembrane, optical, and acoustic-wave based sensors

B M S 535X. Molecular and Cellular Basis of Disease. (1-0) Cr. 1. S. (Dual-listed with B M S 335.) Prereqs: First-year classification in veterinary medicine or graduate student status. Descriptions of molecular and cellular biology, especially as it pertains to veterinary medicine. Discussions of cellular components, cellular functions and anomalies thereof. Emphasis placed on divergences relevant to companion animals and livestock.

BPM I 491X. Portfolio Design and Professional Development. (3-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereqs: BPMI 337, junior or senior classification in the BPMI curriculum. Portfolio and professional preparation including identity package development, writing and speaking. Career-readiness, professional practice, leadership, networking, exploring research subfields within scientific visualization. Creating print and digital visual materials, learning approaches for entering the field, and developing business practice skills. Final portfolio materials presented at the end of the term.

BRT 513X. Biorenewables Supply Chain Management.  Cr.3. S. (Cross-listed with SCM 513X). Prereqs: Graduate standing or qualified undergraduates with instructor permission. Evaluation of supply chain logistics related the field of biorenewables. The unique challenges associated with biorenewables supply chain are emphasized and examined: cost analysis, market demand & prices, life cycle analysis, environmental impacts, as well as, the technological, social, and political factors related to society.

C

C E 395X. Global Perspectives in Transportation. Cr. 3. F. Prereq: CE 355 or equivalent. Background on historical civil engineering design and construction.Impacts of historical, cultural, social, economic, ethical, environmental, and political conditions on the design and construction of various infrastructure projects outside the United States.Global road safety and intermodal operations.Addressing transportation problems in a large metropolitan area.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

C E 489X. Pavement Preservation and Rehabilitation. (3-0) Cr. 3 F. (Dual-listed with C E 589X) Prereqs: C E 382. Overview of pavement preservation and pavement rehabilitation techniques. Overview and selection of materials used in pavement preservation and rehabilitation strategies. Evaluating suitability of pavement preservation and pavement rehabilitation strategies based on existing structure, pavement distresses and non-condition factors. Use of recycled pavement materials in pavement reconstruction techniques.

C E 589X. Pavement Preservation and Rehabilitation. (3-0) Cr. 3 F. (Dual-listed with C E 489X) Prereqs: C E 382. Overview of pavement preservation and pavement rehabilitation techniques. Overview and selection of materials used in pavement preservation and rehabilitation strategies. Evaluating suitability of pavement preservation and pavement rehabilitation strategies based on existing structure, pavement distresses and non-condition factors. Use of recycled pavement materials in pavement reconstruction techniques.

CHEM 326X. Chemical Kinetics. (1-0). Cr. 1. S. Prereqs: CHEM 167, 177, 178, or 201; MATH 166; CHEM 324 and 325 are recommended. Kinetic theory, rate laws, temperature dependence of rate constants, transition-state theory, reaction mechanisms, kinetic isotope effects, catalysts, Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and Marcus theory.

CHIN 378X. Chinese Film and Society. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: ENGL 150 or equivalent. Survey of Chinese cinematic history from 1896 to the present against the background of China’s constant sociocultural transformation; emphasis on narrative themes, film history, and film criticism. Topics vary according to faculty interest. Taught in English.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

CHIN 499X. Internship in Chinese. Cr. 1-3. SS. Prereqs: 9 credits of Chinese at the 300 level; permission of advisor and WLC Internship Coordinator. Work experience using Chinese in the public or private sector, combined with academic work under faculty supervision.

C I 205X. Social Foundations of Schooling in the United States: Early Childhood and Elementary Education. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Introduction to the historical and contemporary landscape of schooling in the United States. Emphasis on topics and tensions in the relationship between school and society (e.g., equity of access to education and competing purposes of education) and the implications of these topics and tensions for teaching and learning in public schools.

C I 405X . Social Justice Education and Teaching: Early Childhood and Elementary. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: C I 201, C I 332, junior classification, admission to teacher education program. Opportunity to expand understanding of issues related to educational and social justice at the levels of Self, Systems, and Teaching. Personal growth and awareness; education within a broader social and historical context; equity and justice-oriented teaching. Special attention is given to enacting culturally relevant teaching in grades PK through 6, along with curriculum transformation and social action in those grades. Restricted to those enrolled in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Programs. Elementary education majors should take CI405 with Block 1 practicum.
Meets U. S. Diversity Requirement.

C I 422X. Teaching and Learning Iowa History. (30-15) Cr. 3. S.S. (Dual-listed with C I 522X) Multicultural and social justice focus on Iowa history; different theme each summer. Effective pedagogical and assessment strategies for integrating these themes into K-12 curriculum.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

C I 441X. Teaching and Learning with Insects. Cr. Variable. F. Prereqs: Junior standing. Concurrently enrolled in Block I practicum in Fall and Block II practicum in Spring (Elementary Education). Introduction to the biology and natural and social ecology of insects with a focus on the use of insect inquiry in the K-8 classroom, and to culturally- and linguistically-responsive and ambitious science teaching, as well as community-based participatory or “citizen science” research. In- and out-of-school teaching and educational activities related to insects. Intended for Elementary Education Majors and other students with an interest in engaging learners’ curiosity about the world through insect biology and the relationship between insects, humans, and public health.

C I 502X. Teaching Mathematics to English Language Learners. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereqs: C I 448 or C I 497/C I 597 for degree students. Classroom teaching experience for non-degree students and in-service teachers. Understanding the needs of various English language learners, learn to use ELLs’ language and culture as a resource in mathematics classrooms, and implement research-based instructional strategies that are effective to teach mathematics for ELLs. For pre–service/in–service teachers and others who will work or currently works with English language learners (ELLs).

C I 510X. Foundations of Game-based Learning. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with HCI 510X). Prereq: 12 graduate credits. Theories, principles and best practices of utilizing games in educational environments. Topics include the theoretical foundations of learning games and game play, identity development in
online environments, and assessment of learning in and out of games.

C I 522X. Teaching and Learning Iowa History. (30-15) Cr. 3. S.S. (Dual-listed with C I 422X) Multicultural and social justice focus on Iowa history; different theme each summer. Effective pedagogical and assessment strategies for integrating these themes into K-12 curriculum.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

C I 534X. Applied Measurement in Experimental Psychology. Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: STAT 401 or RESEV 542. Applied psychology and educational measurement. Measurement and psychometric theory. Focus on reliability and various forms of validity. Test and scale construction strategies. Strategies for investigating individual differences within the context of educational assessment.

CJ ST 220X. Introduction to Forensic Science. (3-0) Cr. 3 F. (Cross-listed with ENT 220X.) Study of fundamental forensic science techniques and procedures covering types of physical, chemical, and biological evidence and how this information is used in the legal system. Assessment of crime scenes and various forensic specialties will be introduced.

CJ ST 410X. Capital Punishment. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereqs: CJ ST 240. History, philosophy, demographics, administration, and punishment rationales of capital punishment in the United States from its founding to the present. Methods of execution and trends in public opinion about the death penalty. Examination of correlates of capital offending and criminological characteristics of persons who are sentenced to death.

CL ST 368X. Religions of Ancient Greece and Rome. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with RELIG 368X.) Nature, origins and development of religious beliefs and practices in ancient Greece and Rome from earliest times up to the rise of Christianity. Roles of divinities and rituals in lives of individuals and families and the governing of city-states and empires. Emphasis on historical contexts of the Graeco-Roman world and influences of neighboring cultures in Africa and Asia.

CMDIS 492X. Fieldwork in Communication Disorders. Cr. 1-2. F. (Cross-listed with LING 492X.) Prereqs: CMDIS/LING 371;471; completion or concurrent enrollment in CMDIS/LING 480A or 480B or 480C. Guided observation of clinical evaluation and treatment in Communication Disorders on campus and in the community. Assessed service learning component.

C R P 251X. Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Fundamentals of the concepts, models, functions and operations of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Principals of spatial problems, spatial questions and hypotheses and their solutions based on spatial data, GIS tools and techniques. Integration of concepts and applications through lectures and facilitated labs. Applications from a variety of areas including design; physical, social, and human science; engineering; agriculture; business and medicine, landscape architecture, architecture, urban planing, geology, forestry, biology, and ecology.

C R P 325X. US Housing Policy. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Housing problems, government housing policy, and housing as a field of urban planning practice. Course introduces students to empirical analysis of housing-related issues and applications to policy. Particular focus on the social and spatial segmentation of housing in the U.S. and the role of policy in housing production and regulation.

C R P 351X. Intermediate Geographic Information Systems. (2-2) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: CRP 251X. Intermediate GIS for design and non-design students to learn concepts of digital management and representation of spatial data, including spatial problems, data sources and structures, simple spatial operations and cartographic issues. Gain skill set to effectively display feature and tabular data,query features using logical expressions, edit spatial and attribute data, associate tables with joins and relates, produce maps, reports, and graphs.

C R P 421X. Financing Historic Preservation Projects and Revitalizing Communities. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Investigation of the financial tools and incentives used to promote the rehabilitation and redevelopment of historic buildings and neighborhoods in cities and towns. Study of broader economic and social impacts on communities. Examinations of completed preservation projects around the United States.

C R P 437X. Public Participation in Planning. (3-0). Cr. 3. S. Rationale and need for public participation in community planning and development. Techniques used to garner participation, and the ability to integrate techniques into a broader participatory process. Techniques covered will include public hearings, public meetings, social action construct, advisory committees, scenario building, social media and asset mapping. Students will also work with a community to demonstrate skills learned.

C R P 450X. Geodesign. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. This course provides an opportunity for students to learn about the fundamental concepts of Geodesign. Geodesign focuses on using a set of techniques and technologies, which can enable stages of project conceptualization, data collection and visualization, spatial analysis, design creation, simulation and stakeholders participation and collaboration. Students read articles discussing Geodesign and watch lectures and presentations given at Geodsign Summits in the USA and Europe. They study applications and study cases in which Geodesign was used and applied. They select a study case and work in interdisciplinary teams to apply learned theoretical Geodesign methodologies and approaches. Students may use any GIS software, ESRI CityEngine, ESRI GeoPlanner and/or Agent-Based Modeling in their studies of the study case.

C R P 453X. Smart Cities. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Introduction to concepts of smart cities. Study of novel technologies for smart governance, sustainable energy, innovative ways for citizens' engagement, improved safety, mobility and healthy living. Examples of national and international smart cities. Living Lab experience.

C R P 454X. Fundamentals of Remote Sensing. Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with C R P 554X and L A 554X). Introduction to remote sensing techniques needed for basic analysis of satellite images, including: filtering and conflation techniques, stacking, pan sharpening, image rectification, image enhancement, unsupervised and supervised classification. Practical applications in a variety of topics to understand how to interpret images.

C R P 459X. GeoVisualization: Imagining Maps. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Fundamentals of communication with maps, reading and understanding maps, navigation in cities as well as indoors, usability of online interactive GIS applications, and online GIS-based participatory applications. Students learn to identify spatial research questions, write corresponding research hypothesis and execute experiments in order to collect relevant data, analyze them and present the results in an oral presentation.

C R P 460X. Social Justice and Planning. Cr. 3. F. (2-2) (Dual-listed with CRP 560X). Investigation of the topic of social justice as it relates to the challenge of planning more socially just urban societies, emphasizing the importance of social justice issues to planning in a globalized world. Includes a range of issues and case studies of local social justice initiatives, both US and global. Students will complete individual service learning projects as part of the course requirements.

C R P 471X. Real Estate Development. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Introduction to real estate issues related to planning, design, and development. Cases exploring the property development process, including residential, office, retail, hotel, and mixed-use. Examines how location decisions are made and property values are created. Focuses on urban, suburban, and rural redevelopment opportunities.

C R P 479X. Public Finance and Planning. Cr. 3. S. (3-0) (Dual-listed with CRP 579X). Effective management of state and local government finance critical to successful community and regional planning. Economic concepts, topics in budgeting, revenue, expenditure, and financing, analytical techniques, economic impact, and case studies. Understanding of economic assessment in planning and understanding of various linkages between planning and public finance.

C R P 511X. Documenting the Historic Built Environment. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Knowledge of GIS helpful but not required. Principals and methods for researching, identifying, recording, and analyzing buildings, districts, and sites that are historically or architecturally significant. Classroom and fieldwork components will use real-world historic places as case studies.

C R P 521X. Historic Preservation Planning: Theory and Practice. (3-0). Cr. 3. S. Introduction to the history, theory, and practice of historic preservation and cultural resource management. Cases exploring preservation in US and global contexts; politics of preservation; preservation technologies; and relationship of preservation to other community issues.

C R P 550X. Making Resilient Environments. (1-1-1) Cr. 3. F. Major theories and ideas revolving around the concept of resilience. Assessing the social and political processes associated with policy making for resilience. Application of the concept of resilience in order to understand and evaluate environments. Evaluate the different approaches toward resilience and develop an understanding of the relationship between sustainability and resilience. Case studies of communities that proactively prepare for, absorb, recover from, and adapt to actual or potential future adverse events.

C R P 554X. Fundamentals of Remote Sensing. Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with C R P 454X and L A 554X). Introduction to remote sensing techniques needed for basic analysis of satellite images, including: filtering and conflation techniques, stacking, pan sharpening, image rectification, image enhancement, unsupervised and supervised classification. Practical applications in a variety of topics to understand how to interpret images.

C R P 559X. Digital Design Methods for Landscape Architecture. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with
L A 559X) Introduction to digital tools used by landscape architects for design development and design communication, including 3D modeling, landscape CAD, image processing, geolocation/navigation (GPS), and geospatial data handling (GIS).

C R P 560X. Social Justice and Planning. Cr. 3. F. (2-2) (Dual-listed with CRP 460X). Investigation of the topic of social justice as it relates to the challenge of planning more socially just urban societies, emphasizing the importance of social justice issues to planning in a globalized world. Includes a range of issues and case studies of local social justice initiatives, both US and global. Students will complete individual service learning projects as part of the course requirements.

COM S 127X. Introduction to Programming for Problem Solving. (3-2). Cr. 4 F. Prereq: MATH 140. Introduction to computer programming with an emphasis on problem solving. Topics include: program structures, expressions, variables, decision and logic, iteration, collections, input and output. Program construction and testing. Programming assignments including games and applications. No prior programming experience necessary. This course is intended for Computer Science majors.

COM S 407X/507X. Applied Formal Methods. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with AER E 407X/507X.) Prereq: MATH 166 and instructor permission. Introduction to the fundamentals of formal methods, a set of mathematically rigorous techniques for the formal specification, validation, and verification of safety-critical systems. Tools, techniques, and applications of formal methods with an emphasis on real-world use-cases such as enabling autonomous operation. Students will build experience in writing mathematically analyzable specifications from English operational concepts for real systems, such as aircraft and spacecraft. Review capabilities and limitations of formal methods in the design, verification, and system health management of today's complex systems.

COM S 453X. Privacy Preserving Algorithms and Data Security. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: COM S 311. Fundamentals of privacy preserving algorithms, data security, anonymization, and techniques and mechanisms to minimize disclosure of sensitive information while maintaining availability. Theory and fundamentals underpinning measures to evaluate the privacy and availability of data; implementation and deployment of privacy-preserving data operations including pre- and post-randomization techniques, homomorphisms, and secure function evaluation protocols. Theory and practice of the algorithmic limits on data privacy, including the cost in terms of time and space complexity.

COM S 559X. Security and Privacy in Cloud Computing. (3-0) Cr. 3 S. (Cross-listed with CPR E 559X) Prereqs: COM S 352 or CPR E 308, and COM S 486 or CPR E 489 or CPR E 530. Overview of cloud computing models, security and privacy threats in cloud computing related to data and computation outsourcing, theoretical results and practical techniques for secure cloud computing and its applications.

COM S 560X. Data-Driven Security and Privacy. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with CPR E 560X and INFAS 560X). Prereqs: CPR E 531; COM S 474 or Com S 573. Examination of applications of machine learning and big data techniques to various security and privacy problems, as well as secure and privacy-preserving machine learning algorithms.

COM S 665X. Advanced Topics in Software Engineering. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: COM S 511. Advanced topics on software repository analysis, data mining and software engineering, software engineering for context-aware and situation-aware computing, distributed development, product lines, safety, security, and reliability, and traceability. Content varies by semester.

COM S 665AX. Advanced Topics in Software Engineering: Foundations.  (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: COM S 511.  Advanced topics chosen from the following: empirical studies on human factors, software repository analysis, data mining and software engineering, software engineering for context-aware and situation-aware computing, distributed development, product lines, safety, security, and reliability, and traceability. Content varies by semester.

COM S 665BX. Advanced Topics in Software Engineering: Empirical. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: COM S. 511.  Advanced topics on empirical studies on human factors. Content varies by semester.

COMST 210X. Communication and U.S. Diversity. (3-0) Cr. 3 SS. Introduction to the role of diversity in communication. Developing competent communication with diverse social groups within interpersonal and organizational contexts in the United States. Topics may include structured reflection of one’s role in diverse communication experiences, cultural variations in communication mores, impacts of racial/ethnic/gender identities on communication, workplace policies regarding cultural diversity, the intersection of communication and cultural privilege, communication practices that can reduce prejudice/discrimination, and communication characteristics of advocates for diversity.
Meets U. S. Diversity Requirement.

CPR E 184X. Computer Engineering Learning Community. Cr.1. F. Prereqs: Member of Cpr E Learning Community. Integration of first-year students into the Computer Engineering program. Assignments and activities involving teamwork, academic preparation, study skills, and preparation for entry into the Computer Engineering profession. Completed both individually and in learning teams under the direction of faculty and peer mentors.

CPR E 231X. Cyber Security Concepts and Tools. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.F. Prereq: COM S 107, or 207, or 227, or E E 285. Basic concepts of practical computer and Internet security and the tools used to protect and attack systems and networks. Computer and network security methods including: user authentication, access control, firewalls, intrusion detection and wireless networks. Vulnerability assessment tools and methods. Ethics and legal issues in cyber security. Laboratory experiments and exercises including computer and network configuration.

CPR E 522X. Cognitive Radio Networks. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with E E 522X). Prereq: Instructor approval. Topics on cognitive radio networks: Cognitive Radio Networks Architecture; Software Defined Radio Architecture; Spectrum Sensing; Spectrum Management; Spectrum Sharing; Spectrum Mobility; Applications of Cognitive Radio Networks.

CPR E 559X. Security and Privacy in Cloud Computing. (3-0) Cr. 3 S. (Cross-listed with COM S 559X) Prereqs: COM S 352 or CPR E 308, and COM S 486 or CPR E 489 or CPR E 530. Overview of cloud computing models, security and privacy threats in cloud computing related to data and computation outsourcing, theoretical results and practical techniques for secure cloud computing and its applications.

CPR E 560X. Data-Driven Security and Privacy. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with COM S 560X and INFAS 560X). Prereqs: CPR E 531; COM S 474 or Com S 573. Examination of applications of machine learning and big data techniques to various security and privacy problems, as well as secure and privacy-preserving machine learning algorithms.

CPR E 598X. Electrical and Computer Engineering Learning Community Seminar. Cr. R. F. (Cross-listed with E E 598X) Prereq: Electrical and Computer Engineering Graduate Student. Introduction to graduate study in Electrical and Computer Engineering at Iowa State University. Building networks, introduction to core requirements, and tools and techniques for success. Graduation Restrictions: ECpE

CPR E 631X. Cyber Security Operations Practicum. (1-6) Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with INFAS 631X). Prereqs: CPR E 532, CPR E 534, and permission of instructor. Practical experience in cyber operations. Cyber security threat analysis, malware analysis, and intrusion detection management. Cyber security data analysis methods. Pen testing tools and techniques. Weekly threat analysis briefings.

D

DSN S 145X. Diversity in Art. (0-1) Cr. 1. S. Discussion on issues of diversity and inclusion utilizing the Art on Campus and University’s Permanent Collection. Topics include ethnic heritage, family background, religious traditions, and interpersonal relationships, with a significant focus on instilling visual analysis skills.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

DSN S 394X. Trace, Touch, Taste: An Exploration of Italian Culture. Cr.3. SS. Prereqs: Junior classification. An experiential exploration of the Italian culture of art and food. Students will gain an understanding about the complex social and cultural dimension of food and how food is embedded in the historic and local identity of the territory. On site art history tours will be accompanied by culinary explorations, visual documentation, and written observations. Off campus tours to “agriturismo” farms offer insights about the process of making olive oil, wine, honey, cheese and prosciutto production. Discussion on slow food movement, sustainable km zero initiative, aspects of the contemporary Mediterranean diet. Cross cultural learning through visual, sensory, and tactile experience. Offered only in Rome, Italy.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

DIET 552X. Advanced Human Nutrition: Macronutrients. (3-0) Cr. 3. Physiological and biochemical aspects of macronutrients metabolism and human nutrition.

DIET 553X. Nutritional Epidemiology. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereqs: Human Nutrition, Statistics. Discussion of important issues related to designing, conducting, and interpreting research on the role of diet or physical activity in the development of disease (& health) in human populations.

DIET 555X. Public Health Nutrition. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereqs: Admission into graduate-level program or instructor permission. Information and activities related to the broad topic of public health nutrition and will focus on how nutrition research, policies and programs impact populations. Students will gain a broader understanding of public health nutrition through case studies, discussions and experiential learning experiences.

E

E E 333X. Electronic Systems Design. (3-3) Cr. 4. F. Prereqs: EE 230 CprE 288 (co-requisite). Further topics in electronic systems design: Use of sensors and actuators. High-power amplifying and switching components. Linear and switched-mode power supplies. Linear and switched-mode amplifiers. Interfacing electronic components with programmable microcontrollers. Printed circuit board technology and design tools. Laboratory exercises and design projects incorporating printed circuit technology.

E E 436X. Physics of Transistors. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: E E 332. Use of energy band diagrams to describe the behavior of junction devices, electron and hole currents in transistors, junction capacitance, parasitic and second-order effects, development of circuit models from the underlying physical behavior, heterojunction devices, high-speed and high-power applications, measurement techniques.

E E 450X. Biosensors. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with B M E 450X) Prereqs: B M E 220. Overview of biosensors and bioanalytical challenges; designing for performance including various analytical problems, ion-selective membranes, characteristics of enzymes and basics of bioaffinity sensing; fundamentals of bioselective layers including depositing films and membranes, surfaces for immobilization and bioselective agents; survey of different biosensing technologies including electroanalytical, biomembrane, optical, and acoustic-wave based sensors

E E 522X. Cognitive Radio Networks. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with CPR 522X). Prereq: Instructor approval. Topics on cognitive radio networks: Cognitive Radio Networks Architecture; Software Defined Radio Architecture; Spectrum Sensing; Spectrum Management; Spectrum Sharing; Spectrum Mobility; Applications of Cognitive Radio Networks.

E E 525X. Data Analytics in Electrical and Computer Engineering. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: E E 322 or equivalent. Introduction to a variety of data analytics techniques -- particularly those relevant for electrical and computer engineers -- from a foundational perspective. Topics to be covered include techniques for classification, visualization, and parameter estimation, with applications to signals, images, matrices, and graphs. Emphasis will be placed on rigorous analysis as well as principled design of such techniques.

E E 598X. Electrical and Computer Engineering Learning Community Seminar. Cr. R. F. (Cross-listed with CPR 598X) Prereq: Electrical and Computer Engineering Graduate Student. Introduction to graduate study in Electrical and Computer Engineering at Iowa State University. Building networks, introduction to core requirements, and tools and techniques for success. Graduation Restrictions: ECpE

E M 580X. Phase Transformations and Plasticity. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: E M 566 or E M 567 or permission of instructor. Continuum approaches to phase transformations and plasticity at nano-, micro-, and macroscales. Interaction between phase transformations and plasticity and different scales. Temperature-, stress-, and strain-induced phase transformations. Transformation-induced plasticity. Thermodynamics and kinetics. Nucleation and growth. Large strain formulation. High pressure phenomena and theories.

E M 585X. Continuum Mechanochemistry. (2-1) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: EM 566 Phase Transformations in Elastic Materials or consent of instructor. Continuum mechanical, thermomechanical, and kinetic fundamentals of the effect of stresses and strains on chemical reactions, phase transformations, diffusion, and compositional changes. Mechanochemical phenomena. Large strain formulation. High pressure mechanochemistry: multiscale approach. Mechanics of oxidation. Lithiation and delithiation of silicon electrodes. Nanovoid formation due to Kirkendall effect.

EL PS 601X. Foundations of Educational Inquiry. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Admission to PhD Program in the School of Education. Foundational course for PhD students in Higher Education programs. Introduction for first-year PhD students to the landscape of scholarship in the field of education while initiating a process of helping doctoral students develop a reflexive stance toward educational inquiry so that they may engage in methodologically rigorous, substantively rich, and socially meaningfully work in the field of education. Presented within the higher education context, presenting and discussing scholarly work that comes from within this context. Practitioner as researcher and philosophical belief that higher education leaders must view their context through a scholarly lens.

ECON 335X. The Economics of Global Agricultural Food & Bio-energy. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with GLOBE 335X.) Prereq: ECON 101. Applied economics analysis of the determinants of world agricultural production, marketing, and use in feed, food, fiber, biofuel, and other applications, and global food processing and consumption. Analysis of market case studies and various data on global agriculture production and transformation.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

ECON 363X. Development of the American Economy. (0-3) Cr. 3. Prereq: ECON 101, ECON 102. Topical and selective survey of the development of the American economy from European settlement to the present. Causes and consequences of economic development, the role of government in the economy, technological change, the evolving role of work and labor, development of the monetary and financial system, and macroeconomic fluctuations.

ECON 435X. Analysis of Food Markets. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with FS HN 435X) Prereqs: STAT 226, ECON 235, ECON 301. Food market analysis from an economics perspective; food markets and consumption; methods of economic analysis; food industry structure and organization; food and agriculture regulations; labeling; consumer concerns; agricultural commodity promotion. Final project required.

ECON 511X. Research Seminar in Experimental Economics. (0-3) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: ECON 510. Design, conduct, interpret, and report on economic experiments. Preparation of a potentially publishable experimental research paper. Topics vary according to student interest.

EDADM 542X. Teacher Leadership. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. The purpose of this course is to gain a deeper understanding of the role of teacher leaders within K-12 schools and to understand how teacher leaders apply various leadership theories and practices within educational organizations for the purposes of school improvement.

EEOB 546X. Computational Skills for Biological Data. (1-2) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with BCB 546X.) Prereqs: Graduate student status or permission of the instructor. Computational skills necessary for biologists working with big data sets. UNIX commands, scripting in R and Python, version control using Git and GitHub, and use of high performance computing clusters. Combination of lectures and computational exercises.

EEOB 583X. Environmental Biogeochemistry. (3-0) Cr. 3. (Dual-listed with BIOL/GEOL/ENSCI 483X.) (Cross-listed with ENSCI/GEOL/EEOB 483X.) Prereqs: Combined 12 credits in biology, chemistry, and physics. Biological, physical, and geochemical controls on elemental cycling in the Earth system. Dynamics of global change and anthropogenic perturbations to global biogeochemical cycles. Biotic and abiotic cycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, metals, and water, and impacts of anthropogenic perturbations on these cycles across spatiotemporal scales. Application of box models and principles of mass balance, kinetics, thermodynamics, and stable isotopes to analyze and predict system behavior.

ENGL 214X. Introduction to Technical Communication. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: ENGL 150. A broad introduction to the culture of professional work as a technical communicator, with particular emphasis on principles and best practices for developing and managing technical information and digital media. Examination of user-centered design, the history of the discipline, cross-cultural communication, and the ethics of communicating complex information to lay audiences. Study and practice of team-based collaboration, project management, and technical editing.

ENGL 270X. Science in Public: Communication, Controversy & Understanding. Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with JL MC 270X, SP CM 270X). Prereq: ENGL 250. Models of communication between scientists, engineers and other professionals and the public. Approaches to public engagement with science and technology including analysis of science communication on controversial topics such as climate change, evolution, and genetically modified organisms.

ENGL 318X. Introduction to ESL methods and materials. (2-1) Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with LING 318X) Prereqs: ENGL/LING 219. Introduction to methods and materials for teaching English as a Second Language (ESL) for elementary and secondary students. Strategies and resources for teaching reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. Elementary Education students must take this course in the same semester as either CI 280S or CI 480S.

ENGL 319X. Studies in Language and Diversity. (3-0) Cr. 3 F. (Cross-listed with LING 319X). Prereq: ENGL 250. Special topics related to the role of language and linguistics in US diversity, such as Dialects and American literature, American English Accents, Legal and Social Aspects of English-only Laws in the US. Connections between language use and social diversity.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

ENGL 320X. Topics in Linguistic Structure. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with LING 320X.) Prereqs: ENGL/LING 219, 220.  Special topics related to the study of linguistic structure. Focus on language structure in areas not covered in detail by existing courses. Topics include field linguistics, morphology, forensic linguistics, neurolinguistics, semantics, non-English phonology, acoustic phonetics, linguistic universals, and historical linguistics.

ENGL 322X. Language and Society. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with LING)  Prereq: ENGL/LING 219.  Introduction to variation in language use in society. Survey of factors affecting language use including background characteristics of language users, location, and purpose of interaction in addition to institutional, state and national language policies.

ENGL 324X. Introduction to Teaching ESL Literacy. (2-1) Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with LING 324X). Prereq: ENGL/LING 219. Introduction to the issues and methods involved in teaching literacy skills to English as a second language (ESL) learners. The nature of literacy and materials and methods for developing ESL literacy at the middle school, high school, and adult ages across multiple levels of competency.

ENGL 325X. Teaching Methods for ESL Learners: Oral Communication Skills. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with LING 325X)  Prereq: ENGL/LING 219. Issues and methods in teaching oral communication skills (listening, speaking, pronunciation) to English as a second language (ESL) learners. The nature of oral language ability. Materials and Methods for developing oral communication skills at middle school, high school, and adult contexts.

ENGL 530X. Technology and Oral Language. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with LING 530X) Prereq: ENGL 219 or ENGL 511 or equivalent. Structure and description of oral language and discourse. How spoken language is linguistically described, analyzed and taught for research and for education. Using technology to record, transcribe, and analyze spoken language at all levels of linguistic structure.

ENGL 552X. Workshop: Scriptwriting. (3-0) Cr. 3 F. Prereqs: ENGL 550 and graduate classification. Majors other than MFA in Creative Writing and Environment need permission of instructor. Individual projects in dramatic writing. Focus on writing for stage, screen, and/or new media. Readings in dramatic literature. Discussion of elements such as plot, character, dialogue, structure, theme, and visual storytelling.

ENGL 562X. Topics in the Study of Film. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: Graduate classification or 6 credits in film at 300 level or above. Intensive study of cinematic genres, periods, movements, or themes; e.g., The Musical, Classical Hollywood Cinema, Structural Film, Art and Cinema. General emphasis will be on American, British, and other Anglophone cinemas.

ENGR 113X. Engineering Principles for Elementary Educators. (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: MATH 142 or satisfactory scores on mathematics placement examinations; restricted to elementary education majors. Introduction to engineering approaches to problem solving, including problem identification, criteria and constraint setting, synthesis, analysis, and iteration. Addresses national standards related to engineering content in elementary education. Applications of fundamental engineering principles to analyze systems as part of the engineering design process. Use of spreadsheet programs to solve engineering problems and present engineering solutions. This course cannot be used towards the graduation requirements of students in ISU engineering degree programs.

ENGR 121X. Learning Skills for Engineering. (0-1) R Credit. F. Exploration of personal and academic strategies that promote academic and career success.

ENGR 155X. Leadership in Engineering Student Organizations. (1-0) Cr. 1. S. Development of leadership skills of student organization leaders in the College of Engineering. Introduction to organizational leadership concepts and analyze organization purpose and function. Students practice mentoring and learn how their campus leadership experiences transfer to the field of engineering.

ENSCI 204X. Applied Exploration of Environmental Science I. (2-0) Cr.1. S. Prereq: ENSCI 203; or permission of instructor. Applied exploration of selected environmental topics including water quality; stormwater regulation and management; how agriculture affects water quality, air quality, and soils; the history and application of environmental policy in the United States. Experiential learning component. Offered satisfactory-fail only.

ENSCI 205X. Applied Exploration of Environmental Science II. (2-0) Cr.1. S. Prereq: ENSCI 204X; or permission of instructor. Continued exploration of environmental topics including storm water policy and management, in-depth team-based research on environmental topics leading to a capstone research project. Experiential learning component. Offered satisfactory-fail only.

ENSCI 270X. Geospatial Technologies. (2-2) Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with AGRON 270X). Concepts and tools for acquiring, managing, analyzing, and displaying geographic information, including GIS, remote sensing, spatial analysis, and cartography. Focus on applications in biological, ecological, environmental, and agricultural sciences.

ENSCI 412X. Micropaleontology. (2-2) Cr. 3.Prereq: GEOL 102 and GEOL 102L. (Dual-listed with ENSCI 512X) (Cross-listed with GEOL 412X).  Evolution, identification and utility of major microfossil groups from the Mesozoic to present. Focus on Cenozoic applications including biostratigraphy, paleoclimate, and paleothermometry using assemblages, stable isotopes, Mg/Ca, and molecular fossils. Laboratory includes processing and analysis of specific microfossils. Major groups covered include foraminifera, calcareous nannofossils, sponge spicules, diatoms, radiolarians, and silicoflagellates.

ENSCI 483X. Environmental Biogeochemistry. (3-0) Cr. 3. (Dual-listed with BIOL/GEOL 483X.) (Cross-listed with ENSCI/GEOL/EEOB 583X.) Prereqs: Combined 12 credits in biology, chemistry, and physics. Biological, physical, and geochemical controls on elemental cycling in the Earth system. Dynamics of global change and anthropogenic perturbations to global biogeochemical cycles. Biotic and abiotic cycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, metals, and water, and impacts of anthropogenic perturbations on these cycles across spatiotemporal scales. Application of box models and principles of mass balance, kinetics, thermodynamics, and stable isotopes to analyze and predict system behavior.

ENSCI 583X. Environmental Biogeochemistry. (3-0) Cr. 3. (Dual-listed with BIOL/GEOL/ENSCI 483X.) (Cross-listed with ENSCI/GEOL/EEOB 483X.) Prereqs: Combined 12 credits in biology, chemistry, and physics. Biological, physical, and geochemical controls on elemental cycling in the Earth system. Dynamics of global change and anthropogenic perturbations to global biogeochemical cycles. Biotic and abiotic cycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, metals, and water, and impacts of anthropogenic perturbations on these cycles across spatiotemporal scales. Application of box models and principles of mass balance, kinetics, thermodynamics, and stable isotopes to analyze and predict system behavior.

ENT 214X. Insects in Forensic Science. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Introduction to the use of insects as evidence in court and how they can assist in solving crimes. Topics covered include basic insect biology, systematics, behavior, with emphasis on applications of forensic entomology.

ENT 220X. Introduction to Forensic Science. (3-0) Cr. 3 F. (Cross-listed with CJ ST 220X). Study of fundamental forensic science techniques and procedures covering types of physical, chemical, and biological evidence and how this information is used in the legal system. Assessment of crime scenes and various forensic specialties will be introduced.

ENT 270L. Mosquito Surveillance and Curation. (0-3) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: BIOL 101 or BIOL 211. Mosquito biology, identification, rearing, trapping, museum curation of specimens, theory of vector control and molecular testing techniques. Collection required.

ENV S 471X. Global Environmental History. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. (Cross-listed with HIST 471X). Prereqs: Either one of HIST 201, 202, or 207; or 3 credits of Environmental Studies. Survey of the interactions of human communities with their environments from the beginnings of human history to the present. Topics include the domestication of animals, the agricultural revolution, industrialization, urbanization, deforestation, hydraulic management, fossil fuel consumption, and climate change.

EVENT 203X. Event Management Sophomore Mentorship. (1-2) Cr. 2. S. Prereqs: Sophomore classification; AESHM 113; EVENT 271; by application only. Event Management sophomore students will be paired with a professional mentor in the event industry. Students will meet in the class and individually with their professional mentor throughout the spring semester. Students will be assessed on their experience through reflection, presentation, and mentor evaluation.

EVENT 212X. Digital Production in Event Management. (1-2) Cr. 2. F. Prereq: Event Management major. Applications of basic skills in Adobe InDesign and Adobe Photoshop. Introduction to design elements used within the event management industry with a focus on digital publishing of marketing and promotional materials, wayfinding, and other stationery items. Face-to-face lecture and laboratory work. Half-semester course.

EVENT 328X. Incentive Meeting Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: EVENT 271, Event Management major. Overview of the incentive meeting industry. Focus on incentive meeting planning, destination selection, program development, risk management, cultural aspects of international/national site selection and incentive meeting execution, and incentive meeting evaluation.

EVENT 378X. Sustainable Event Management. (3-0) Cr. 3 S. Prereqs: EVENT 271, EVENT majors. Introduction to international sustainable event standards, and how to measure the environmental impact of an event. Topics include ethics, corporate social responsibility (CSR), and sustainability related practices. Students will be expected to complete written assignments and participate in group-based projects.

EVENT 379X. Nonprofit Fundraising Event Planning. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: EVENT 271, Instructor's permission. The role of Nonprofit Organizations (NPOs) in the United States, and how NPOs secure essential income and help educate donors, guests, and volunteers of the organizational mission. Fundamentals of an event-based fundraising (e.g., a gala dinner) or community-based fundraising (e.g., runs, walks, and rides). Budgeting, marketing outreach, logistics management. Use of strategic tools, such as website and social media, to help increase financial success of a fundraising event. Grant-writing content.

EVENT 423X. International Meetings and Conferences Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: EVENT 423X. Strategies and tactics for planning a meeting, exposition, or convention that is held outside of the United States; and a meeting, exposition, or convention that attracts numerous international attendees to the United States.

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FIN 450X. Analytical Methods in Finance. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: STAT 326, and ECON 301 or FIN 301. Applied empirical methods commonly employed in the analysis of firm and market data. Specific applications to financial and agricultural markets. Experiential learning experience using lectures with frequent in-class computer work sessions. Experience with financial and agricultural data sources. Application and interpretation of empirical techniques.

FIN 474X. Real Estate Investment. (3-0). Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: FIN 301, FIN 371.  Introduction to theories and methods of investment analysis applied to real estate. Studies cash flow analysis, alternative measures of investment performance, the impact of the financing decision on real estate investment risks and return, and various real estate financing techniques. Covers cases involving more complex financing and capital markets tools used in real estate.

FIN 476X. Applied Real Estate Analysis. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: STAT 326, and ECON 301 or FIN 301. This course will present applied empirical methods commonly employed in real estate analysis such as the construction and use of price indexes, hedonic methods of property valuation and discrete choice models. Rural and urban property valuation methods will be emphasized, and the determinants of ownership, investment and financing choice will be investigated. Specific applications to residential, commercial and agricultural markets will be undertaken.

FOR 542X. Dynamics of Forest Stands. (2-3) Cr. 3. F. (Dual-listed with FOR 442X.) Prereq: NREM301, FOR 302, STAT 101 or their equivalents. Change in forest species composition and structure at the stand and landscape scales resulting from site quality, tree growth, competition, succession, and disturbance. Methods for assessing tree growth and reconstructing past stand development. Applications to forest and savanna management.

FS HN 120X. The Biochemistry of Beer. (2-0) Cr. 2. F. (Cross-listed with BBMB 120X.) An introduction to the major classes of biomolecules, basic biochemical concepts, enzymology, metabolism and the genetic engineering as they apply to the production and flavor of beer. All aspects of biochemistry of beer will be covered, including the malting of barley, starch conversion, yeast fermentation, and the chemical changes that occur during the aging of beer. Intended for nonmajors. Natural science majors limited to elective credit only.

FS HN 315X. Professional Development for Food Science Majors. (2-0) Cr. 2. F. Prereqs: Food Science Majors with at least a junior level status. Preparation for internships and careers in Food Science. Importance of soft skills and application of those skills to potential job situations.

FS HN 435X. Analysis of Food Markets. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with ECON 435X) Prereqs: STAT 226, ECON 235, ECON 301. Food market analysis from an economics perspective; food markets and consumption; methods of economic analysis; food industry structure and organization; food and agriculture regulations; labeling; consumer concerns; agricultural commodity promotion. Final project required.

FS HN 477X. Fundamentals of Packaging. (2-3) Cr.3. S. Prereqs: Chem 163 or 177 Chem 178 Biol 212 Engl 250 Math 160,165 or 181 PHYS 115 or 111 Stat 101,104 or 105. The study of materials, design, processes, performance and safety of packaging. Applied experiences include: packaging design, fabrication and performance testing for packaged products.

FS HN 509X. Sensory Evaluation of Wines.  (2-1) Cr.1. S. Prereqs: Must be at least 21 years of age; senior or graduate status. Principles of sensory evaluation and their application to wine evaluation. Sensory testing methods such as discrimination tests, ranking, descriptive analysis and scoring of wines will be covered. Students will have the opportunity to evaluate and learn about major types and styles of wines of the world. Lab fee.

FS HN 567X. Global Nutrition. (3-0) Cr. 3 F. (Cross-listed with NUTRS 567X) Prereq: Graduate standing for NUTRS 567X; Undergraduates may enroll with instructor permission. Global nutrition issues, including the epidemiology, etiology, sociocultural and economic context, and program and policy responses to topics. Students will research country-specific issues such as malnutrition, growth stunting, micronutrient deficiencies, sanitation, and obesity and chronic disease.

FS HN 589X. Systems Neuroscience: Brain, Behavior, and Nutrition-Related Integrative Physiology. (2-0) Cr. 2. S. (Cross-listed with PSYCH 589X, NEURO 589X, NUTRS 589X, GERON 589X.) Prereqs: Graduate standing, or undergraduate with consent of instructor. Structural, functional, and biochemical aspects of brain and non-motor behavior across the human lifespan. Types of neuroimaging used to assess the brain. Current research is leveraged to gauge how nutrition, diseases related to nutrition, and associated physiological processes influence the brain, particularly for common developmental, psychological, and neurological disorders.