Experimental Courses 2019-2020, A-F

A B C D E F

A B E 493X. Workshop in Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering . Cr. 1-3. F.S.SS. Prereq: Permission of Instructor. Workshop experience in agricultural and biological systems engineering, involving topics such as Power Machinery Engineering, Animal Production Systems Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering, Bioenvironmental Engineering, Food Engineering, Biorenewable Resources Engineering.

A B E 516X. Data Science and Analytics for Agricultural and Biosystem Engineers. (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Credit in A B E 160 or equivalent . Introduction to research methods associated with data science concepts and their applications. Analyses and research related to agricultural and biosystems engineering and technology; methods to develop and maintain reproducible data analysis pipelines; best practices of data visualization and communication of data-driven results to broad audiences; concepts of data integrity and ethics.

A ECL 231X. Principles of Wildlife & Fisheries Conservation. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: BIOL 211, BIOL 212, NREM 120. Introduction to the principles of wildlife and fisheries management. Case studies will be explored along with assessment methods used to understand management including conservation of populations, species and communities, as well as habitat preservation and restoration.

A ECL 372X. Wildlife Population Methods . (1-8) Cr. 4. SS. Prereq: BIOL 312 or NREM 311. Field-intensive study of population ecology. Emphasis on hands-on learning of study design and techniques to assess population trends in plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates inhabiting terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.

A ECL 435X. Entomology Field Trip. (Cross-listed with ENT 435X). (1-6) Cr. 2. Repeatable. Irr. S. Irr. SS. Prereqs: BIOL 312 or equivalent and permission of instructor; ENT 370 or ENT 425 or equivalent recommended. Field trip to study insects of major terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Location and duration vary.

A ECL 444X. Aquatic Toxicology. (Dual-listed with A ECL 544X and TOX 544X; cross-listed with TOX 444X). (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereqs: Graduate student status, or undergraduate status having declared a minor in Pharmacology and Toxicology, or having completed BIOL 211 and BIOL 212. An overview of interactions between anthropogenic chemicals and aquatic ecosystems. Topics include history of aquatic toxicology, methods of toxicity testing, and species responses to toxicants. Emphasis is on aquatic pollutants of emerging concern (e.g., nanoparticles, microplastics).

A ECL 544X. Aquatic Toxicology. (Dual-listed with A ECL 444X and TOX 444X; cross-listed with TOX 544X). (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereqs: Graduate student status, or undergraduate status having declared a minor in Pharmacology and Toxicology, or having completed BIOL 211 and BIOL 212. An overview of interactions between anthropogenic chemicals and aquatic ecosystems. Topics include history of aquatic toxicology, methods of toxicity testing, and species responses to toxicants. Emphasis is on aquatic pollutants of emerging concern (e.g., nanoparticles, microplastics).

A M D 226X. 3D Designing and Patternmaking for Soft Good Product Development . Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: A M D 121 and A M D 204 . Continuation of the creative process for soft good product development. Transition of ideas into prototypes using soft materials. An introduction to technical patternmaking and grading for the development of soft good items such as gloves, hats, socks, backpacks, tents, etc. Develop soft goods 3D design thinking and making practice skills through drafting, flat pattern, and draping techniques to promote prototypes/samples.

A M D 393A. Apparel, Merchandising, and Design Workshop: Accessories . Cr. 1-3. F.S.SS. Rereq: A M D Junior or Senior Classification and Permission of Instructor. Intensive 2- to 8-week workshop exploration. Topics vary each time offered.

A M D 393F. Apparel, Merchandising, and Design Workshop: Footwear . Cr. 1-3. F.S.SS. Rereq: A M D Junior or Senior Classification and Permission of Instructor. Intensive 2- to 8-week workshop exploration. Topics vary each time offered.

A M D 393M. Apparel, Merchandising, and Design Workshop: Menswear . Cr. 1-3. F.S.SS. Rereq: A M D Junior or Senior Classification and Permission of Instructor. Intensive 2- to 8-week workshop exploration. Topics vary each time offered.

A TR 217X. Clinical Practicum in Athletic Training I. Cr. 1. S. Prereq: A TR 221, A TR 222, Permission of Athletic Training Program Director . Athletic training clinical experiences for pre-athletic training students.

A TR 228X. Basic Orthopedic Assessment and Evaluation Principles. (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: BIOL 255, BIOL 255L, BIOL 256, BIOL 256L. Assessment procedures and evaluation techniques for upper and lower body orthopedic conditions and injuries.Includes an overview of mechanisms of injury, general musculoskeletal disorders, spine or neurological dysfunction.

A TR 229X. Clinical Practicum in Athletic Training. (3-0) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: Concurrent enrollment in A TR 228. Permission of Athletic Training Program Director.  Pre-Athletic training clinical experiences designed to orientate students to the assessment and evaluation principles of upper and lower body orthopedic conditions and injuries. Pre-athletic training students will observe athletic trainers in various athletic training clinical sites. Concurrent enrollment in A TR 228. Satisfactory-Fail only.

A TR 328X. Athletic Injuries Clinical Practicum. (0-2) Cr. 1. Prereq: Permission of athletic training program director . Athletic training clinical experiences for pre-athletic training students. Clinical experiences include: prevention of injury screening strategies, athletic training room and education program policies and procedures, review of athletic taping techniques, acute injury management, and anatomy review.

A TR 549A. Athletic Training Clinical Education Study Abroad: Preparing for the Experience .  Cr. 1. Prereq: In addition to the study abroad application requirements, students must be accepted into their intended program, junior classification or graduate student majoring in Athletic Training, minimum GPA of 3.0, and completion of A TR 220, or A TR 228X and A TR 229X. Preparation for a study abroad experience that is focused on the discipline of athletic training in another country. Pre-travel for A TR 549B study abroad experience.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

A TR 549B. Athletic Training Clinical Education Study Abroad. Cr. 2. Prereq: Accepted to study abroad by the A TR Program Director and passing A TR 549AX. First-person perspective into the athletic training profession in another country as well as provide enrichment experiences related to the history and culture of that country. Follow-up course and experience of one credit A TR 549A which was intended to prepare the student for the study abroad experience.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

A M D 509X. Clothing Comfort and Functional Textiles: Theory and Practice . (2-0) Cr. 3. Provide background knowledge and relevant theories on clothing comfort issues, specifically the functional garment and protective clothing. Introduce the heat stress/heat strain associated with wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) including several cases on sportswear, firefighter gear, military personnel, mining workers, medical practitioners and law enforcement. Research project.

ACCT 371X. Entrepreneurship and Accounting Information . (Cross-listed with ENTSP 371X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: ACCT 284. Accounting information recording, dissemination, and use by entrepreneurs. Introduces pro forma financials, venture capital, private equity, and state and federal regulations for business creation and formation. Other topics include intrapreneurship, intellectual property, information privacy, cybersecurity, and internal controls, including managing the risk of embezzlement.

ACCT 515X. Accounting Analytics. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: ACCT 384 or instructor permission. Applications and skills for performing data analytics in accounting contexts. Explores conceptual framework for providing data-driven insights and recommendations. Includes hands-on experiences working with different types of data and the latest analysis tools.

ADVRT 391B. Audio Lab – Creating your own podcast. (Cross-listed with JL MC, P R). Cr. 1. Podcasting is one of the fastest growing media delivery systems. Work with KHOI radio professionals to create your own podcast. Develop an idea, write, record, edit and market your podcast. Satisfactory-fail only.

ADVRT 391E. From Posts to Profits: How to Tackle Social Media Influencer Marketing. (Cross-listed with JL MC, P R). (1-0) Cr. 1. According to USA Today, by 2020 brand spending on influencer marketing is expected to hit $101 billion. Students will learn the benefits and how-to of social media influencer engagement from both brand managers and influencers. The course will include interactive sessions with these professionals as well as small-group final projects. Satisfactory-fail only.

ADVRT 391F. Political  Reporting: Covering Candidates & Caucuses 2020. (Cross-listed with JL MC, P R). (1-0) Cr. 1. According to USA Today, by 2020 brand spending on influencer marketing is expected to hit $101 billion. Students will learn the benefits and how-to of social media influencer engagement from both brand managers and influencers. The course will include interactive sessions with these professionals as well as small-group final projects. Satisfactory-fail only.

ADVRT 391G. Organizational  Communication in Times of Change. (Cross-listed with JL MC, P R). (1-0) Cr. 1. An organization’s success relies on its ability—and agility—when faced with large-scale changes: mergers and acquisitions, plant closings, downsizing. Professional communicators can play a strategic role in effectively managing change, if they understand why stakeholders resist or embrace change. This course will prepare future public relations professionals to play a valuable and strategic role in today’s turbulent social and business environment. Satisfactory-fail only.

ADVRT 391J. The Basics of Video Storytelling using Live Sports Production. Cr. 1. (Cross-listed with JL MC, P R). Students will get the opportunity to learn the basics of telling the Cyclones brand story using live sports video production. Students will use professional equipment you would see in a video control room or production truck.

AER E 407X. Applied Formal Methods. (Dual-listed with AER E 507X and COM S 507X; Cross-listed with COM S 407X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: MATH 166 and instructor permission. Introduction to the fundamentals of formal methods, a set of mathematically rigorous techniques for the formal specification, validation, and verification of safety-critical systems. Tools, techniques, and applications of formal methods with an emphasis on real-world use-cases such as enabling autonomous operation. Students will build experience in writing mathematically analyzable specifications from English operational concepts for real systems, such as aircraft and spacecraft. Review capabilities and limitations of formal methods in the design, verification, and system health management of today's complex systems.

AER E 452X. Introduction To Systems Engineering And Analysis. (Cross-listed with I E 452X). (3-0) Cr. 3. SS.  Prereq: Junior Classification in an Engineering Major. Principles of systems engineering to include problem statement formulation, stakeholder analysis, requirements definition, system architecture and concept generation, system integration and interface management, verification and validation, and system commissioning and decommissioning operations. Introduction to discrete event simulation processes. Students will work in groups to propose, research, and present findings for a systems engineering topic of current relevance.

AER E 490MX. Aerospace Engineering Independent Study: Intelligent Systems and Autonomy . Cr. 1-6. F.S.SS. Prereq: Junior or Senior classification; approval of the department .

AER E 494X. Make to Innovate II. Cr. 2-3. Repeatable. F. Prereqs: Restricted to Junior or Senior classifications; Instructor permission required. Multidisciplinary projects to engage students in the fundamentals of engineering, project management, systems engineering, teamwork, and oral and visual communication. Students will define and attain their team objectives and milestones that are approved by their instructors. Graduation restrictions: Maximum of 6 credits may count toward graduation as Technical Elective.

AER E 504X. Reinforcement Learning and Autonomy. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: AER E 361 (or equivalent), junior standing or above. Instructor permission required. Introduces decision making under uncertainty from a computational perspective and provides an overview of the necessary tools for building autonomous and decision-making systems. Introduction to probabilistic models and decision theory. Computational methods for solving decision problems with stochastic dynamics, model uncertainty, and imperfect state information. Applications include air traffic control, aviation surveillance systems, autonomous vehicles, and robotics.

AER E 507X. Applied Formal Methods. (Dual-listed with AER E 407X and COM S 407X; Cross-listed with COM S 507X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: MATH 166 and instructor permission. Introduction to the fundamentals of formal methods, a set of mathematically rigorous techniques for the formal specification, validation, and verification of safety-critical systems. Tools, techniques, and applications of formal methods with an emphasis on real-world use-cases such as enabling autonomous operation. Students will build experience in writing mathematically analyzable specifications from English operational concepts for real systems, such as aircraft and spacecraft. Review capabilities and limitations of formal methods in the design, verification, and system health management of today's complex systems.

AER E 544X. Viscous Flow. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: AER E 311 or M E 335. Kinematics and dynamics of compressible viscous fluid flow in aerodynamics. Derivation of the Navier-Stokes and compressible Prandtl boundary layer equations. Asymptotic analysis and solution methods for low/high Reynolds number compressible boundary layer flows.

AER E 554X. Metaheuristic Optimization and Modeling for Complex System Design. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Graduate standing in College of Engineering or permission of instructor. Introduction to the theoretical foundation and methods associated with meta-modeling and metaheuristic optimization, including categories of meta-modeling methods and applications in which each class of meta-modeling methods should and could be used, as well as metaheuristic optimization methods and the types of applications for which each is best suited.

AER E 651X. Space Trajectory Optimization. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: AER E 451, AER E 551. Classical methods and recent advances in space trajectory optimization. Primer vector theory, introduction to direct and indirect methods for trajectory optimization, the problem of multi gravity assist with deep space maneuvers (MGADSM), optimization of the MGADSM using evolutionary algorithms, hidden genes genetic algorithms for trajectory optimization, and shape-based methods for trajectory design.

AESHM 365X. Event, Hospitality, and Retail Risk Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. Overview and management of hazards and risks in the planning, design, operation, and evaluation stages of events, hospitality organizations, and apparel/retail environments.

AESHM 476C. Entrepreneurship Studio: Creating an Online Business. Cr. 3. Prereq: AESHM 275 or permission of instructor. Basics of how to create and launch an online business including the unique challenges and opportunities that come with running an online business in a social media society.

AESHM 499X. Research, Seminar, or Senior Project. Cr. 1-3. F.S.SS. Repeatable. Research, seminar, or senior project in apparel, events, and hospitality management.

AESHM 501X. Introduction to Scholarly Research for Graduate Students. Cr. R. F.S.SS. Repeatable. F ocus on the basics of developing scholarly research, including definition and purpose of research and the components of research reporting. Emphasis on standards for each section of research reports. Tips for research reporting and processes of research development. An introduction to ethical standards. Required of all new AESHM graduate students. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

AESHM 502X. Research Methods in Apparel, Events, and Hospitality. (3-0) Cr. 3. SS. Prereq: Enrolled in graduate program.  Overview of research method. Understanding the preliminary considerations for selecting qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods research design. Includes knowing the definition for these different approaches, considering philosophical worldviews, and understanding the use of theory. Discussion of the methods and procedures for quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods studies.

AESHM 579X. Data Analytics for Apparel, Event, and Hospitality Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. SS. Prereq: STAT 587 or equivalent (AESHM 510, HD FS 503). Business analytics is a process of transforming data into meaningful insights and actionable results in the context of decision making and problem solving. Review of the data-related challenges apparel, event, and hospitality organizations confront and the importance of data analytics in making critical management decisions. Basic analytic techniques including data management, analysis, interpretation, and visualization and analyze case studies that successfully deployed these techniques.

AF AM 310X. Africa to 1880. (3-0) Cr. 3. (Cross-listed with HIST 310X). Survey of the history of African societies, cultures and civilizations from earliest times to 1880. Evolution of states across the continent; social, economic, political, and cultural developments; nature and consequences of African interactions and relationship with Europeans.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

AF AM 335X. Race, Ethnicity, and the US Criminal Justice System. (Cross-listed with CJ ST 335X). (2-1) Cr. 3. Prereq: CJ ST 240 or AF AM 201. Empirical and theoretical readings on the intersection of race, ethnicity, crime, and the criminal justice system in contemporary society. Topics include, but are not limited to racial and ethnic relations in society, media, violence, policing, and disparity and discrimination in crime and punishment. Criminological theories of racial and ethnic antagonism.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

AF AM 355X. Understanding Sub-Saharan Africa . (Cross-listed with ANTHR 355X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Sophomore status or AF AM 201, ANTHR 201, 230. Survey of economic, social, political and historical processes that have shaped representations of Africa and Africans. Topics include colonialism, globalization, gender and LGTBQ rights, conflict and representations in Western media.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

AGEDS 323X. Strategic Communication in Agriculture and the Environment. (Cross-listed with P R 323X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. S. Prereqs: ENGL 250; Junior classification. Effective communication of agricultural and environmental issues. Analysis of attitudes, advocacy, stakeholder engagement, and impacts on individual and societal choices. Application in the domains of public relations, mass media, and popular culture.

AGEDS 425X. Curriculum for Agricultural Science Education. (Dual-listed with AGEDS 525X). Cr. 1-6. Repeatable. SS. Inquiry-based techniques for education related to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in agriculture in secondary classrooms. Analyze, demonstrate, and design activities, labs, and projects using inquiry-based frameworks for teaching and learning.  

AGEDS 525X. Curriculum for Agricultural Science Education. (Dual-listed with AGEDS 425X). Cr. 1-6. Repeatable. SS. Inquiry-based techniques for education related to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in agriculture in secondary classrooms. Analyze, demonstrate, and design activities, labs, and projects using inquiry-based frameworks for teaching and learning.

AGEDS 568X. Qualitative Interviews and Analysis. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Graduate status. Understanding the role of interviews in agricultural education research, basis for theory of meaning, and variations of interview technique among qualitative traditions. Development of facilitation technique for individual interviews; and focus groups. Transcription and basic qualitative analysis. Use of interview findings to prepare manuscripts.

AGEDS 580X. A Survey of Leadership Theories. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.  Examine postulates, applications and limitations of various leadership theories such as Transformational Leadership, Authentic Leadership, Servant Leadership, and Adaptive Leadership. Valuable to individuals interested in pursuing leadership opportunities in academia and business; and specifically Agricultural Education, Communication and Extension Education.

AGRON 140L. Climate and Society Laboratory. (Cross-listed with MTEOR 140L/ENV S 140L/GEOL 140L). (0-2) Cr. 1. F.S. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in MTEOR/AGRON/ENV S/GEOL 140X or Instructor Permission . Analyze and interpret weather and climate data. Relationship between climate and society based on data and case studies from the real world. The climate system in the past and present based on climate data. The role of climate in shaping society and distribution of resources. Natural and human driven climate change. Carbon and water footprints. Global and regional scale impacts of climate change in the 21st century. Feasible solutions to adapting to and mitigating climate change.

AGRON 140X. Climate and Society. (Cross-listed with MTEOR 140X/ENV S 140X/GEOL 140X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. The climate system of our planet. How nature and our actions alter the existing energy balance leading to climate change. Past climates on our planet. The influence of climate on society and resource availability during the Holocene (~ 11,000 years ago to present) with focus on changes post industrial revolution. Significant climate events that have altered our way of life in the past. Projected changes in future climate and potential impacts on society, environment and resources. Adaption to and mitigation of climate change.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

AGRON 270X. Geospatial Technologies. (Cross-listed with ENSCI 270X). (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Concepts and tools for acquiring, managing, analyzing, and displaying geographic information, including GIS, remote sensing, spatial analysis, and cartography. Focus on applications in biological, ecological, environmental, and agricultural sciences.

AGRON 537X. Quantitative Analytics for Plant Breeding. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: AGRON 181, Math 140. Methods to quantify consequences of decisions based on analytical methods used in crop genetic improvement and cultivar development.

AGRON 542X. Organic Plant Breeding. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: AGRON 506/HORT 506 or AGRON 421/HORT 421 . Strategies for organic breeding programs with an emphasis on objectives, opportunities and challenges. Historical, legal, and economic aspects of agronomy and organic breeding from a national and international perspective.

AGRON 665X. Digital Soil Mapping. (Cross-listed with ENSCI 665X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. In depth readings and discussion of methods applied to produce soil maps using digital geospatial data and geographic information systems. Issues considered will include complications of scale, connecting statistically identified patterns with soil formation processes, and how to best deliver soil information to diverse audiences.

AGRON 693X.  Entrepreneurship for Graduate Students in Science and Engineering . (Cross-listed with E E 693X, BCB 693X, ENGR 693X, GENET 693X, and M E 693X). (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.  Prereq: Graduate student status and completion of at least one semester of graduate coursework. Understanding key topics of starting a technology based company, from development of technology-led idea to early-stage entrepreneurial business. Concepts discussed include: entrepreneurship basics, starting a business, funding your business, protecting your technology/business IP. Subject matter experts and successful, technology-based entrepreneurs will provide real world examples from their experience with entrepreneurship. Learn about the world class entrepreneurship ecosystem at ISU and Central Iowa.

AM IN 201X. Native People in American Culture. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Perceptions and the realities of Native people living in and responding to American society and culture. Topics include representations, contemporary Native identity, literature, the arts, history, film, and issues of diversity.
Meets U. S. Diversity Requirement.

AM IN 318X. Women and Gender in Native Societies. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: Recommended: AM IN 210 OR AM IN 201X OR WGS 201 OR WGS 160.  Women and gender roles in historical and contemporary Native societies; issues of perception, discrimination, equality; Native feminism; representation in mainstream society.
Meets U. S. Diversity Requirement.

AM IN 324X. Health and Native American Communities. (Cross-listed with ANTHR 324X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: ENGL 250. Overview of historic and contemporary health and health care in Native Communities. Indian Health Service and specific regulations. Consideration of both cultural and scientific approaches to medicine. Specific health issues (e.g., diabetes, alcoholism, depression, etc.) in American Indian communities.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

AM IN 328X. American Indian Religions. (Cross-listed with RELIG 328X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. An introduction to the beliefs and rituals of Native American religious traditions, with attention to cultural and historical contexts and implications.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

AN S 228X. Laboratory Animal Science. (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: AN S 101, AN S 114; recommended: ANS 214. Introduction to the species, uses, biology, facilities, care, and diseases of animals used in research.

AN S 373A. Poultry Products Technology. Cr. 3. SS. Prereqs: CHEM 163 or 177 or equivalent required; BIOL 211 or 212 or equivalent recommended. Basic principles of meat-producing and egg-laying poultry management, meat science, product functionality, egg quality, and food safety, product quality, product functionality, and food safety. 2-week course. Enrollment restricted to participants in the Midwest Poultry Consortium Center of Excellence Scholarship/Internship program.

AN S 373B. Applied Avian Physiology. Cr. 3. SS. Prereqs: CHEM 163 or 177 or equivalent required; BIOL 212 or equivalent recommended. Introduction of industry-relevant aspects of avian physiology with emphasis on behavior, neurology, muscle, cardiovascular, immunology, digestive, endocrinology, and reproductive systems for egg and meat producing birds. Focus on avian physiology and relevance to production management and outcomes. 2-week course. Enrollment restricted to participants in the Midwest Poultry Consortium Center of Excellence Scholarship/Internship program.

AN S 373C. Avian Health. Cr. 3. SS. Prereqs: CHEM 163 or 177 or equivalent required; BIOL 212 or equivalent recommended. Identification, diagnosis, management, and prevention of diseases in commercial poultry. 2-week course. Enrollment restricted to participants in the Midwest Poultry Consortium Center of Excellence Scholarship/Internship program.

AN S 373D. Poultry Nutrition. Cr. 3. SS. Prereqs: CHEM 163 or 177 or equivalent required; BIOL 211 or 212 or equivalent recommended. Commercial poultry-specific nutrition with an emphasis on species and age-specific diet formulation, ingredient selection, feed production, and production system. Use of feed additives and production outcomes. 2-week course. Enrollment restricted to participants in the Midwest Poultry Consortium Center of Excellence Scholarship/Internship program.

AN S 427X. Beef Cow-Calf Systems Management. (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: AN S 226, AN S 270, AN S 320, AN S 331, AN S 352; and ECON 230 or equivalent. Decisions facing the administrator of a beef cow-calf enterprise. Financial and production goal identification, problem clarification, and resource allocation to manage the cow-calf enterprise. Computer-aided study. Only one of AN S 427X or AN S 426 may count toward the AN S 400 level enterprise management requirement.

AN S 473A. Poultry Enterprise Management. Cr. 3. SS. Prereqs: CHEM 163 or 177 or equivalent required; BIOL 211 or 212 or equivalent recommended. Business and management aspects of the poultry industry. Emphasis on personal interactions, effective communication, interview skills, poultry management, writing a business plan, and business decisions. 2-week course. Enrollment restricted to participants in the Midwest Poultry Consortium Center of Excellence Scholarship/Internship program.

AN S 473B. Breeder Flock and Hatchery Management. Cr. 3. SS. Prereqs: CHEM 163 or 177 or equivalent required; BIOL 211 or 212 or equivalent recommended. Topics associated with the management of poultry breeder flocks and hatcheries: nutrition, lighting management, reproductive physiology, and husbandry for breeder flocks. Embryology, incubation techniques, biosecurity, and hatchery management. 2-week course. Enrollment restricted to participants in the Midwest Poultry Consortium Center of Excellence Scholarship/Internship program.

AN S 482X. Advanced Swine Science. (2-0) Cr. 2. Prereq: AN S 225 or AN S 280. An in-depth application of basic concepts covered in Basic Swine Science, focused on the scientific principles to the economical and sustainable production of pork. Detailed analysis of benchmarking, production systems, reproduction, pig flow, ventilation and herd health are discussed. Students will become knowledgeable regarding the science, complexity, and technology applied in modern swine production businesses. Graduation Restrictions: Elective credit only for majors in animal science or dairy science.

AN S 563X. Advanced Processed Meats Technology. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: AN S 270 or equivalent, or at least two undergraduate courses in biology, food science, microbiology or culinology. Physical, chemical and biological properties of meat important to processed meat product characteristics. Ingredients, technology and equipment used for fresh and cured meat products. Packaging, preservation and food safety issues critical to processed meat products are emphasized.

AN S 573X. Fresh Meat Science and Technology. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: An S 270 or equivalent, or minimum two undergraduate courses in biology, food science, microbiology or culinology. Quality, and sensory attributes of fresh meats and how they develop and how they are evaluated. The study of ante and postmortem factors impacting quantity, composition, structure, and chemistry of red meat and poultry muscle/meat. Graduation restriction: Students cannot receive credit for both AN S 570 and AN S 573X .

ANTHR 324X. Health and Native American Communities. (Cross-listed with AM IN 324X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: ENGL 250. Overview of historic and contemporary health and health care in Native Communities. Indian Health Service and specific regulations. Consideration of both cultural and scientific approaches to medicine. Specific health issues (e.g., diabetes, alcoholism, depression, etc.) in American Indian communities.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

ANTHR 352X. Migration and Refugees in the 21st Century. (Cross-listed with POL S 352X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. The historical, economic, social, political, and environmental factors that explain human mobility in the 21st century. The definition of a “migrant” with special emphasis on refugees (people who have been forcibly displaced across national borders). Ethnographic accounts of current refugee crises and of host state policy toward refugees.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

ANTHR 355X. Understanding Sub-Saharan Africa . (Cross-listed with AF AM 355X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Sophomore status or AF AM 201, ANTHR 201, 230. Survey of economic, social, political and historical processes that have shaped representations of Africa and Africans. Topics include colonialism, globalization, gender and LGTBQ rights, conflict and representations in Western media.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

ARCH 438X. Architectural Robotics. (Dual-listed with ARCH 538X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Prereqs: ARCH 230; ARCH 301; or equivalent skills. Junior, Senior or graduate standing. Exploration of robots as design and manufacturing tools for architects. Emphasis on developing robotic technologies and workflows with relevance to architectural design.

ARCH 538X. Architectural Robotics. (Dual-listed with ARCH 438X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Prereqs:  Graduate Standing and ARCH 601 or equivalent skills. Exploration of robots as design and manufacturing tools for architects. Emphasis on developing robotic technologies and workflows with relevance to architectural design.

ARCH 557X. Architecture and Sustainable Design. (2-1) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Enrollment in the Masters of Real Estate Management or instructor permission. Introduction to architecture and sustainable design principles for graduate students with little to no knowledge of the architectural profession. Emphasis on conceptual, technical and legal frameworks used during the architectural design and implementation process. Topics may include: fundamental design principles, key movements in architectural history, and the architect’s role in the project development process.

ARCH 573X. Contemporary Issues in Global Housing. (Cross-listed with C R P 573X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: Senior or graduate standing. Investigation of broader social and economic processes around the globe from the housing perspective. Case study approach to shelter struggles and the various policy and design responses related to them, as a means of understanding a range of issues important to urban systems including poverty, development, urbanization, migration, social movements and citizenship.

ARTGR 383X . A Concise History of Graphics and Sports. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. This introduction to basic concepts of branding in design explores the processes of sports, graphics of sports, design criteria of sport objects, consumer trends, and social importance of sports will be discussed. This course takes a historical perspective of sport graphics and objects starting at the first known understanding of what could be considered “Sport,” from ancient times to the present. Interpretation of sport graphics and sport objects. Measuring the sports impact and associated graphics with emotions; sounds that date the sport or strengthen our memories of them, photographs of objects and people from different periods, images of industrial, sport, agrarian and city landscapes to remind us of the dominant role played by sport/graphics or that sport object in the country of its origin.

ARTGR 531X. Graphic Design Thesis Preparation. (1-0) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: Acceptance to Graphic Design Graduate Program. Exploration, formulation and structuring of graduate thesis topic, investigation of design research and creative scholarship. Satisfactory-fail only.

B

B M E 450X. Biosensors. (Cross-listed with E E 450X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: B M E 220. Overview of biosensors and bioanalytical challenges; designing for performance including various analytical problems, ion-selective membranes, characteristics of enzymes and basics of bioaffinity sensing; fundamentals of bioselective layers including depositing films and membranes, surfaces for immobilization and bioselective agents; survey of different biosensing technologies including electroanalytical, biomembrane, optical, and acoustic-wave based sensors.

B M S 448X. Principles of Human Gross Anatomy. (2-6) Cr. 4. Repeatable. S.SS. Prereq: BIOL 255 or equivalent AND an introductory biology course. BMS 448X will be a laboratory-centered course that focuses on prosected human cadavers to develop an in-depth understanding of human anatomical function.The course will follow a regional approach and stress relationships between neighboring anatomical structures.During laboratory sessions, students teams will study anatomy from multiple individuals to gain an appreciation for anatomical variation and effects on the body from aging, disease, etc.Additional laboratory activities include study in osteology, radiograph interpretation and case studies.

B M S 535X. Molecular and Cellular Basis of Disease. (1-0) Cr. 1. F. Prereqs: Graduate student status. Descriptions of molecular and cellular biology, especially as it pertains to veterinary medicine. Discussions of cellular components, cellular functions and anomalies thereof. Emphasis placed on divergences relevant to companion animals and livestock.

BBMB 303X. General Biochemistry. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: CHEM 331 or equivalent. Survey of biochemistry: structure and function of amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids; enzyme activity; metabolism; DNA replication; RNA transcription; protein translation; with case studies examining industrial uses. Not acceptable for a credit towards a major in biochemistry, biophysics or agricultural biochemistry.

BBMB 212X. Experimental Research Skills in Biochemistry. (1-3) Cr. 2. F.S. Prereq: BBMB 102; credit or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 178 or CHEM 201. Inquiry-based introduction to biochemical techniques such as protein purification, enzymatic assays, solution preparation, hypothesis formation and testing, data analysis, high-throughput methodology, research record keeping, technical writing and scientific communication.

BBMB 512X. Principles of Glycobiology. (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereq: 3 credits in Organic Chemistry. Structure, synthesis, and functions of glycans, glycoproteins, glycolipids, and glycosylated secondary metabolites in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Fundamental role of glycans in living organisms along with the most advanced techniques used for their characterization. Biotechnological applications of glycans and glycoconjugates for human needs.

BBMB 531X. Plant Biochemistry. (2-0) Cr. 2. F. Prereqs: BBMB 301 or equivalent. In-depth exploration of plant biochemistry with a focus on the unique aspects of plants versus heterotrophic organisms. Analysis of unique pathways, metabolic trafficking between unique organelles and tissues, and techniques for their characterization.

BBMB 549X. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. (Cross-listed with CHEM 549X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: any one of the following: CHEM 324, CHEM 325, BBMB 461, BBMB 561. Theoretical principles of NMR, practical aspects of experimental NMR, solution and solid state NMR, methodologies for molecule characterization, protein structure determination, NMR relaxation, and recent advances.

BBMB 551X. Computational Biochemistry. (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereq: BBMB 404 or equivalent. Biological and structural databases, molecular visualization, sequence comparisons, homology searches, sequence motifs, construction of phylogenetic trees, structure comparisons, protein structure predictions, RNA structure predictions, molecular docking, metabolic pathways .

BCB 523X. Mathematical Modeling in Biology . (Dual-listed with MATH 423X; Cross-listed with MATH 523X and BCBIO 423X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MATH 266 or equivalent; MATH 265 or equivalent recommended. Introduction to mathematical techniques for modeling and simulation, parameter identification, and analysis of biological systems. Applications drawn from many branches of biology and medicine. Apply differential equations, difference equations, and dynamical systems theory to a wide array of biological problems.

BCB 546X. Computational Skills for Biological Data. (Cross-listed with EEOB 546X). (1-2) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: Graduate student status or permission of the instructor. Computational skills necessary for biologists working with big data sets. UNIX commands, scripting in R and Python, version control using Git and GitHub, and use of high performance computing clusters. Combination of lectures and computational exercises.

BCB 693X.  Entrepreneurship for Graduate Students in Science and Engineering . (Cross-listed with AGRON 693X, E E 693X, ENGR 693X, GENET 693X, and M E 693X). (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.  Prereq: Graduate student status and completion of at least one semester of graduate coursework. Understanding key topics of starting a technology based company, from development of technology-led idea to early-stage entrepreneurial business. Concepts discussed include: entrepreneurship basics, starting a business, funding your business, protecting your technology/business IP. Subject matter experts and successful, technology-based entrepreneurs will provide real world examples from their experience with entrepreneurship. Learn about the world class entrepreneurship ecosystem at ISU and Central Iowa.

BCBIO 423X. Mathematical Modeling in Biology . (Dual-listed with MATH 523X; Cross-listed with MATH 523X and BCB 523X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MATH 266 or equivalent; MATH 265 or equivalent recommended. Introduction to mathematical techniques for modeling and simulation, parameter identification, and analysis of biological systems. Applications drawn from many branches of biology and medicine. Apply differential equations, difference equations, and dynamical systems theory to a wide array of biological problems.

BIOL 420X. Plant Molecular Biology. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: BIOL 211 & BIOL 212.  Molecular aspects of plant biology with an emphasis on model seed plants. Topics include plant metabolism, genome organization and expression, cell architecture, membrane transport, protein trafficking and special topics related to development and response to biological and environmental stimuli. Includes examples from contemporary experimental plant biology research.

BUSAD 491E. Professional Experiencial Learning: Other Experiential Learning Experience. Cr. 1-3. SS. Repeatable. Prereqs: 12 credits from the College of Business; selection to Okoboji Entrepreneurship Institute. Supervised work experience in a business related discipline.

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C E 190X. Introduction to Undergraduate Research in Civil and Environmental Engineering . Cr. 2. Prereq: Permission of instructor . Introduction to research, focusing on sub-disciplines of civil engineering. Research questions, hypotheses, literature reviews, experimental design, data collection, data analysis, and presentation. Topics chosen to introduce students to water resources, environmental engineering, transportation engineering, geotechnical/materials engineering, or structural engineering.

C E 519X. Methods for Data-Driven Computational Engineering Research . (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Permission of Instructor. Recent advances in computational and statistical methods and theories that will promote data-driven engineering research. Solve various engineering problems involving complex, large-scale engineering data. Experience representing complex engineering data and real-world populations, handle uncertainty behind the data, assess impact of the uncertainty on complex engineering responses, learn and predict engineering responses by solely using data, leverage data to complement high-precision computer simulations, handle random real-world information, and cure engineering data plagued with many incomplete data points. High-performance cluster of CoE (HPC-Class) will be utilized for computational exercises and practical projects. Ample examples and computational programs will be provided to students for applications to their own research .

C E 592X. Modern Landfill Design. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: C E 360 and C E 326. Design and analysis of landfills, including the environmental impact. Fundamental aspects of geotechnical engineering and geochemical evaluation that apply to problems of waste containment. Properties of materials generally used in landfills. Landfill designs such as construction of landfill liners, leachate collection system, and gas collection system, and covering and capping of landfills. Impact of the use of different geosynthetics for landfill applications by studying real performance data such as filtration rates, strength properties, and resistance against chemical and biological reactions that may occur in the landfill waste material. Evaluation of the fate, transport and speciation of contaminants through the liner systems.

C E 594T. Spl Topics Construction Engr and Mgt: Principles and Practices Teaching Civil and Construction Engr. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. Prereq: Permission of instructor.  Instruct graduate students as teaching assistants and future civil and construction engineering instructors in principles and practices of teaching in civil and construction engineering.

C E 594W. Spl Topics Construction Engr and Mgt: Construction Stormwater Management and Green Infrastructure. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Process of erosion, sediment transport, and sedimentation including strategies adopted to prevent and manage erosion on construction sites. Applications using green infrastructure and low impact development to manage post-construction stormwater impacts including runoff quantity and quality.

C DEV 501X. Foundations of Community Development . (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Introduction to the philosophy, techniques, and methodologies of community development relative to engagement, planning, evaluation, economic analysis, leadership and capacity building. The purpose of the course is to engage students in some of the kinds of activities community development professionals often encounter and develop a broad understanding of the application of that work.

C R P 325X. US Housing Policy. (3-0). Cr. 3. S.  Housing problems, government housing policy, and housing as a field of urban planning practice. Course introduces students to empirical analysis of housing-related issues and applications to policy. Particular focus on the social and spatial segmentation of housing in the U.S. and the role of policy in housing production and regulation.

C R P 471X. Real Estate Development. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Introduction to real estate issues related to planning, design, and development. Cases exploring the property development process, including residential, office, retail, hotel, and mixed-use. Examines how location decisions are made and property values are created. Focuses on urban, suburban, and rural redevelopment opportunities.

C R P 573X. Contemporary Issues in Global Housing. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: Senior or graduate standing. Investigation of broader social and economic processes around the globe from the housing perspective. Case study approach to shelter struggles and the various policy and design responses related to them, as a means of understanding a range of issues important to urban systems including poverty, development, urbanization, migration, social movements and citizenship.

CH E 410X. Electrochemical Engineering. (3-0) Cr. 3. (Dual-listed with CH E 510X). Prereq:  CH E 357, CH E 381, CH E 382. Electrochemical engineering principles in thermodynamics, electrode kinetics, charge and mass transport; modeling and simulation; electrocatalysis; electrochemical reactions; applications of electrochemical engineering in fuel cells, batteries and electrolyzers.

CH E 412X. Core Concepts in Chemical Engineering. (3-0). Cr. 3. S. SS. Prereqs: CHEM 178, MATH 267, PHYS 222. Survey of the engineering science fundamentals in chemical engineering. Topics include material balances, energy balances, thermodynamics, transport phenomena, and reaction engineering.

CH E 510X. Electrochemical Engineering. (3-0) Cr. 3. (Dual-listed with CH E 410X). Prereq:  CH E 357, CH E 381, CH E 382. Electrochemical engineering principles in thermodynamics, electrode kinetics, charge and mass transport; modeling and simulation; electrocatalysis; electrochemical reactions; applications of electrochemical engineering in fuel cells, batteries and electrolyzers.

CHEM 326X. Chemical Kinetics. (1-0). Cr. 1. S. Prereqs: CHEM 167, 177, 178, or 201; MATH 166; CHEM 324 and 325 are recommended. Kinetic theory, rate laws, temperature dependence of rate constants, transition-state theory, reaction mechanisms, kinetic isotope effects, catalysts, Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and Marcus theory.

CHEM 549X. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. (Cross-listed with BBMB 549X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: any one of the following: CHEM 324, CHEM 325, BBMB 461, BBMB 561. Theoretical principles of NMR, practical aspects of experimental NMR, solution and solid state NMR, methodologies for molecule characterization, protein structure determination, NMR relaxation, and recent advances.

CJ ST 335X. Race, Ethnicity, and the US Criminal Justice System. (Cross-listed with AF AM 335X). (2-1) Cr. 3.  Prereq: CJ ST 240 or AF AM 201. Empirical and theoretical readings on the intersection of race, ethnicity, crime, and the criminal justice system in contemporary society. Topics include, but are not limited to racial and ethnic relations in society, media, violence, policing, and disparity and discrimination in crime and punishment. Criminological theories of racial and ethnic antagonism.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

CJ ST 404X. Criminal Justice Policies. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: CJ ST 240.  Development, implementation and evaluation of criminal justice policies affecting major areas of the criminal justice system. History, development and operation of the criminal justice system, including policing, courts/sentencing, corrections, crime prevention, and offender rehabilitation.

CJ ST 405X. Drugs and Crime. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: CJ ST 240.  Analysis of the drug problem, including issues arising from the use and abuse of legal and illegal drugs and their relation to crime and the criminal justice system. Examination of issues related to effective prevention and treatment, crime, and the debates over the most effective policies for the control or prevention of drug abuse.

CJ ST 406X. Gender and Crime. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: CJ ST 240.  Overview of the relationship between gender and crime. Examination of gender and gender roles definitions; how gender impacts criminal behavior in terms of offending, victimization, criminal justice processing, and working in the criminal justice system; and theories used to understand the gender gap in offending.

CJ ST 470X. Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Ethical issues and considerations in policing, the practice of law, sentencing, corrections, criminal justice research, and crime control policy. Decision-making by criminal justice professionals in an environment of competing interest. Policy and legal issues confronting the American criminal justice system from an ethical perspective. Emphasis on moral and ethical issues in the criminal justice process.

CL ST 369X. Ancient Egypt. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Archaeology and culture of Ancient Egypt from prehistory to Late Antiquity. Exploration of literature, religion, social history, government, and architecture. Discussion of major archaeological sites and methods; examination of interaction with other ancient near eastern and Mediterranean civilizations.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

COM S 295X. Programming-based Problem Solving Practices. (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S. Prereq: COM S 207 or COM S 227. Basics of problem solving using programming techniques. Development and implementation of simple to advanced data structures and algorithms, evaluation of problem difficulty, design and implementation of solutions, debugging, and working under time pressure. Satisfactory-fail only.

COM S 407X. Applied Formal Methods. (Dual-listed with COM S 507X and AER E 507X; Cross-listed with AER E 407X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: MATH 166 and instructor permission. Introduction to the fundamentals of formal methods, a set of mathematically rigorous techniques for the formal specification, validation, and verification of safety-critical systems. Tools, techniques, and applications of formal methods with an emphasis on real-world use-cases such as enabling autonomous operation. Students will build experience in writing mathematically analyzable specifications from English operational concepts for real systems, such as aircraft and spacecraft. Review capabilities and limitations of formal methods in the design, verification, and system health management of today's complex systems.

COM S 476X. Motion Strategy Algorithms and Applications. (Dual-listed with COM S 576X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereqs:  ENGL 250, SP CM 212, COM S 311. Recent techniques for developing algorithms that automatically generate continuous motions while satisfying geometric constraints. Applications in areas such as robotics and graphical animation. Basic path planning. Kinematics, configuration space, and topological issues. Collision detection. Randomized planning. Nonholonomic systems. Optimal decisions and motion strategies. Coordination of Multiple Bodies. Representing and overcoming uncertainties. Visibility-based motion strategies. Implementation of software that computes motion strategies. Written reports.

COM S 507X. Applied Formal Methods. (Dual-listed with COM S 407X and AER E 407X; Cross-listed with AER E 507X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: MATH 166 and instructor permission. Introduction to the fundamentals of formal methods, a set of mathematically rigorous techniques for the formal specification, validation, and verification of safety-critical systems. Tools, techniques, and applications of formal methods with an emphasis on real-world use-cases such as enabling autonomous operation. Students will build experience in writing mathematically analyzable specifications from English operational concepts for real systems, such as aircraft and spacecraft. Review capabilities and limitations of formal methods in the design, verification, and system health management of today's complex systems.

COM S 527X. Concurrent Systems. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: COM S 352.  Fundamentals and advances in concurrent systems in the context of multicore and manycore systems and high-performance computing with specific focus on parallel programming languages, code analysis and performance engineering. Discussion of parallel architectures, engineering parallel software, parallel design patterns and concurrency patterns, testing and debugging, machine learning for parallel programs, and high-performance deep learning.

COM S 576X. Motion Strategy Algorithms and Applications. (Dual-listed with COM S 476X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereqs:  ENGL 250, SP CM 212, COM S 311. Recent techniques for developing algorithms that automatically generate continuous motions while satisfying geometric constraints. Applications in areas such as robotics and graphical animation. Basic path planning. Kinematics, configuration space, and topological issues. Collision detection. Randomized planning. Nonholonomic systems. Optimal decisions and motion strategies. Coordination of Multiple Bodies. Representing and overcoming uncertainties. Visibility-based motion strategies. Implementation of software that computes motion strategies. Written reports.

COM S 578X. Optimization for Machine Learning. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: COM S 472, COM S 474, or instructor permission. Advances in optimization theory and algorithms with evolving applications for machine learning. Theoretical and mathematical foundations at the intersection of optimization and machine learning to conduct advanced research in machine learning and related fields. Emphasis on proof strategies and techniques for optimization algorithm design and analysis in machine learning theory.

COMST 450A. Special Topics in Communication Studies: General. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Research and theory related to special topics and issues in communication studies.

COMST 450B. Special Topics in Communication Studies: General. (3-0) Cr. 3. Research and theory related to special topics and issues in communication studies.

CPR E 234X. Legal, Professional, and Ethical Issues in Cyber Systems. (1-2). Cr. 3. S. Prereq: COM S 227, or E E 285, or MIS 207. Emphasizes legal, ethical, and professional issues in cyber systems. Other topics include privacy, government regulation, and compliance as applied to professional practice. Guest lecturer from government and industry, as well as discussions including current legal and ethical issues found in the main stream.

CPR E 301X. ECSEL Leadership Studio. (Cross-listed with E E 301X). (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S. Introductory leadership course provides emerging student leaders with an understanding of effective leadership practices, social change strategies, and information on engagement opportunities on campus and in the community. Students will be expected to connect course content to their lives, critically analyze their experiences, and to become civically engaged in society.

CPR E 331X. Application of Cryptographic Concepts to Cyber Security. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: CPRE 231. Basic cryptographic underpinnings used in modern cyber security encryption suites. Encryption benefits to cyber security and its use in protocols. Topics include cryptographically secure hash functions and pseudorandom numbers, key distribution techniques, secure authentication including single sign on. Detection and prevention of security threats such as covert communication, malicious code, and other security threats in protocols are included. In addition to laboratory experiments and exercises, students complete a project focused on cyber security problem and solution.

CPR E 414X. Introduction to Software Systems for Big Data Analytics. (3-2) Cr. 4. F. Prereqs: COM S 363; or CPR E 315 or CPR E 308; or COM S 311 or COM S 352. Introduction to different perspectives of the “data universe” and trade-offs when choosing an appropriate perspective. Impact of the concept(s) of analytics – from raw data, through its storage/representation, to interacting and querying (linguistic/interface issues). Focused studies on 3-4 different domains, followed by generalization of the concepts/abstractions and preparing the students for the next course in this realm, targeting different domains/problems. Understanding the dependencies between problem-domain needs and the data properties, and their impact on choosing appropriate analytics tools (and how/why those tools were developed and exist in the manners that they do). In addition, the students will be exposed to (limited selection of) internals of such tools.

CPR E 432X. Cyber Security Practicum. (1-4) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: CPR E 331. Design and implementation of a secure networked environment that will be penetration tested by other peers in the course. Evaluations will be made of each environment and whether it withstood testing and what vulnerabilities were able to be exploited. After this attack phase, students will complete an evaluation of their security plans and take the necessary remediation steps to further harder their networked environment. The lecture will target the tactics needed to be taken by the students in their weekly lab practicum. Technical writing skills in the design documents, implementation plans, and post-mortem security evaluations.

CPR E 440X. Operating System Security. (Cross-listed with CYB E 440X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: CPR E 308 OR COM S 352. Focus on fundamentals and advanced topics in operating system (OS) security. Design issues, principles, mechanisms, and good practice for design and implementation of secure computer/OS systems. Threat models, vulnerabilities, attacks compromise security, and advanced OS-level techniques for achieving security. Topics include OS security concepts and principles, seminal security in Multics, vulnerabilities in ordinary systems, secure capability systems, information flow control, mandatory access control, security kernels, memory protection, file system, virtual machine systems, hardware/architecture support (e.g., Intel SGX) for OS security, secure microkernel OSes (e.g., seL4, QNX), modern mobile operating systems (e.g., Android and iOS), and security from end-user perspective. Assignments include labs exploring and implementing the technologies in the context of the Linux, Android, and seL4 systems (some involving kernel programming).

CPR E 503X. Power Management Integrated Circuits. (Cross-listed with E E 503X). (3-0). Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2018. Pre-reqs:  E E 435, or Credit or Registration for E E 501. Introducing in-depth chip-level power management integrated circuit (PMIC) designs, including switching power converters, linear regulators, charge pumps and other types of PMICs. Steady-state and dynamic response analysis and optimization of linear regulators and switching power converters with different control methodologies, such as voltage-/current-/band-band control. Chip-level circuit design considerations, optimizations and cadence simulations for PMICs, including system and block-level circuits, such as voltage reference, current source and current mirror, current sensor, ramp generator, non-overlapping power stage, and other circuits.

CPR E 548X. Cyber-Physical Systems Networking. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereqs: CPR E 489, CPR E 530/CPR E 430, COM S 486, or equivalent. Cyber-physical systems applications in smart agriculture, transportation, power grid, manufacturing, public safety, health systems, etc.; field area and control networks; industrial Ethernet; time-triggered communication; real-time wireless networks; wireless industrial networks; safety and security of industrial networks; systems platforms for cyber-physical systems networks; team-based learning/projects.

CPR E 562X. Secure Software Engineering. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq:  CPR E 308 or COM S 352. Fundamentals and techniques to design and implement software systems. Assessment of security vulnerabilities in software systems, exploitation of software vulnerabilities, and methods to secure vulnerable software. Secure coding practices, data analytics for security, microservices and cloud services security. Reverse engineering and security assessment of cyber-physical systems.

CPR E 563X. Advanced Data Storage Systems. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: CPR E 308 OR COM S 352. Focus on how to keep valuable digital data (e.g., scientific computations, financial transactions, family photos) safely in modern computer systems. Fundamentals of data storage technologies including state of the art. Topics include storage hardware, Linux file systems, and warehouse-scale big data storage, with an emphasis on the design tradeoffs for robustness and security. Team projects based on high-impact open-source systems.

CPR E 595X. Independent Study. Cr. 1-3. F.S.SS. Investigation of an approved topic commensurate with the student's prerequisites.

CYB E 396X. Summer Internship . Cr. R. Repeatable. S. Prereq: Permission of department and Engineering Career Services . Professional work period of at least 10 weeks during the summer. Students must register for this course prior to commencing work. Satisfactory - Fail.

CYB E 440X. Operating System Security. (Cross-listed with CPR E 440X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: CPR E 308 OR COM S 352. Focus on fundamentals and advanced topics in operating system (OS) security. Design issues, principles, mechanisms, and good practice for design and implementation of secure computer/OS systems. Threat models, vulnerabilities, attacks compromise security, and advanced OS-level techniques for achieving security. Topics include OS security concepts and principles, seminal security in Multics, vulnerabilities in ordinary systems, secure capability systems, information flow control, mandatory access control, security kernels, memory protection, file system, virtual machine systems, hardware/architecture support (e.g., Intel SGX) for OS security, secure microkernel OSes (e.g., seL4, QNX), modern mobile operating systems (e.g., Android and iOS), and security from end-user perspective. Assignments include labs exploring and implementing the technologies in the context of the Linux, Android, and seL4 systems (some involving kernel programming).

D

DIET 534X. Nutrition Education in the Community. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Enrollment in GPIDEA MFCS in Dietetics. Principles and practices of teaching individuals and groups to translate nutrition knowledge into action. Emphasis on research in and evaluation of nutrition education. Online only.

DIET 541X. Understanding Food Culture. (3-0). Cr. 3. Alt S, offered 2020.  Survey of topics that affect how we perceive food in the modern world. Food is examined as a badge of cultural identity, focus of media scrutiny and promotion, symbol of religion, and driver of technology.

DIET 551X. Advanced Nutrition: Nutrigenomics, Nutrigenetics & Advanced Lipid Metabolism in Human Nutrition. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Exploration and integration of topics and ideas that are at the forefront of the field of nutritional science. Examination of topics that are new and/or controversial and have implications that range from the cellular/molecular/biochemical level up to clinical/educational level. Emphasis on the integrative and complex nature of human nutrition research from basic science to clinical studies to population studies and dietary recommendations.

DIET 555X. Public Health Nutrition. (3-0). Cr. 3. F.S. Prereqs: Admission into graduate-level program or instructor permission.  Examines U.S. public health and nutrition concerns in diverse U.S. populations, examines nutritional status in communities, looks at health communication, and considers nutrition policies and community-based nutrition interventions. Students explore roles of dietitians, nutritionists, and others in developing and delivering nutrition policies and interventions in U.S. communities.

DIET 576X. Diabetes Medical Nutrition Therapy. Cr. 3. Prereq: Course in medical nutrition therapy or permission of instructor. An in-depth study of diabetes management with emphasis in nutrition care. Topics will include diabetes pathophysiology, clinical care guidelines, basic pharmacology, clinical nutrition education and counseling strategies, and nutrition care planning.

DS 422X. Mathematical Principles of Data Science. (Cross-listed with MATH 422X; Dual-listed with MATH 522X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: MATH 414. Mathematical foundations of algorithms in data science. Topics include Riemann-Stieltjes integration, Riesz-Markov theorem, Stone-Weierstrass theorem, Universal Approximation theorem, reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces, Cauchy and Fourier kernels, convergence of clustering algorithms, and topological persistence.

DSN S 501X. Introduction to Research Design. (2-1) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Admission into a graduate program or senior standing. Introduction to research design and methodology in social science research. Essential knowledge and skills required to frame and conduct research independently. Emphasizes various aspects of research design including: foundations of research; understanding research -related concepts; research ethics; developing research questions; reviewing literature and theory; critiquing and evaluating research studies; exploring data collection and analysis; writing research proposal and presenting findings to a diverse audience.

E

E E 301X. ECSEL Leadership Studio. (Cross-listed with CPR E 301X). (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S. Introductory leadership course provides emerging student leaders with an understanding of effective leadership practices, social change strategies, and information on engagement opportunities on campus and in the community. Students will be expected to connect course content to their lives, critically analyze their experiences, and to become civically engaged in society.

E E 425X. Machine learning: A Signal Processing Perspective. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: E E 322/STAT 322 (preferred) or STAT 330; and MATH 207 or MATH 407/507 (preferred). Basic machine learning tools and techniques. Predictive modeling, regression (least squares estimation), classification (multiple hypothesis testing), Bayesian supervised learning and time series analysis (MMSE estimation, MAP estimation, Kalman filtering and more), unsupervised learning (clustering, PCA, robust PCA). Introduce neural network and deep learning methods and the publicly available software packages for these.

E E 436X. Physics of Transistors. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: E E 332. Use of energy band diagrams to describe the behavior of junction devices, electron and hole currents in transistors, junction capacitance, parasitic and second-order effects, development of circuit models from the underlying physical behavior, heterojunction devices, high-speed and high-power applications, measurement techniques.

E E 450X. Biosensors. (Cross-listed with B M E 450X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: B M E 220. Overview of biosensors and bioanalytical challenges; designing for performance including various analytical problems, ion-selective membranes, characteristics of enzymes and basics of bioaffinity sensing; fundamentals of bioselective layers including depositing films and membranes, surfaces for immobilization and bioselective agents; survey of different biosensing technologies including electroanalytical, biomembrane, optical, and acoustic-wave based sensors.

E E 503X. Power Management Integrated Circuits. (Cross-listed with CPR E 503X). (3-0). Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2018. Prereqs:  E E 435, or Credit or Registration for E E 501. Introducing in-depth chip-level power management integrated circuit (PMIC) designs, including switching power converters, linear regulators, charge pumps and other types of PMICs. Steady-state and dynamic response analysis and optimization of linear regulators and switching power converters with different control methodologies, such as voltage-/current-/band-band control. Chip-level circuit design considerations, optimizations and cadence simulations for PMICs, including system and block-level circuits, such as voltage reference, current source and current mirror, current sensor, ramp generator, non-overlapping power stage, and other circuits.

E E 526X. Deep Learning: Theory and Practice. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: MATH 207, E E 322. Review of basic theoretic tools such as linear algebra and probability. Machine learning basics will then be introduced to motivate deep learning networks. Different deep learning network architectures will be studied in detail, including their training and implementations. Applications and research problems will also be surveyed at the end of the class.

E E 531X. Micro and Nano Systems and Devices. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: E E 332, E E 432 or E E 532 . Fundamentals of modeling and design of micro-nanosystems and devices based on various operational mechanisms. Significant hands-on experience using commercial software COMSOL to design and model micro-nanosystems and devices for biomedical and biomedicine applications among others. Experimental hands-on experience to operate the fabricated micro-nanosystems and devices in the instructor's research lab.

E E 592X. Seminar in Electical Engineering. Cr. 1-4. F.S. Technical seminar presentations on topics in various areas in electrical engineering. It will have the following sections, corresponding to graduate study areas in the department: Bioengineering; Communications, signal processing, and machine learning; Electric power and energy systems; Electromagnetic, microwave, and nondestructive evaluation; Microelectronics and photonics; Systems and controls; and VLSI.

E E 595X. Independent Study. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Investigation of an approved topic commensurate with the student's prerequisites. Satisfactory-Fail only.

E E 693X.  Entrepreneurship for Graduate Students in Science and Engineering . (Cross-listed with Agron 693X, BCB 693X, ENGR 693X, GENET 693X, and M E 693X). (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.  Prereq: Graduate student status and completion of at least one semester of graduate coursework. Understanding key topics of starting a technology based company, from development of technology-led idea to early-stage entrepreneurial business. Concepts discussed include: entrepreneurship basics, starting a business, funding your business, protecting your technology/business IP. Subject matter experts and successful, technology-based entrepreneurs will provide real world examples from their experience with entrepreneurship. Learn about the world class entrepreneurship ecosystem at ISU and Central Iowa.

E M 580X. Phase Transformations and Plasticity. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: E M 566 or E M 567 or permission of instructor. Continuum approaches to phase transformations and plasticity at nano-, micro-, and macroscales. Interaction between phase transformations and plasticity and different scales. Temperature-, stress-, and strain-induced phase transformations. Transformation-induced plasticity. Thermodynamics and kinetics. Nucleation and growth. Large strain formulation. High pressure phenomena and theories.

ECON 194X. Special Topics in Economics. Cr. 1. Repeatable. 8 week course. Instructor-arranged topics exploring economics concept and tools.

ECON 383X. Economics of Innovation. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: ECON 101. Key concepts in the economics of innovation. Definition and measure of innovation; useful mental frameworks in understanding innovation; factors that drive innovation; and policies and actions that impact direction and rate of innovation.

ECON 494X. Entrepreneurship in Agriculture Startup. Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: ECON 334, Permission of Instructor. D evelopment of viable business start-ups based on students’ demonstrated intention in starting businesses. Development of business plans for start-ups with an emphasis on agriculture.

ECON 511X. Research Seminar in Experimental Economics. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: ECON 510. Design, conduct, interpret, and report on economic experiments. Preparation of a potentially publishable experimental research paper. Topics vary according to student interest.

ECON 621X. Advanced Labor Demand and Labor Markets. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: ECON 601 or ECON 520. Analysis of labor demand, job search and matching, unemployment, market determination of wages, compensating differentials, employment contracts and incentives, wage inequality and discrimination, effects of minimum wage legislation, occupation choice, labor unions.

EDADM 625X. Social Justice Leadership in Organizations. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Graduate Standing.  Study of the principles of transformative leadership and leadership for social justice. Exploration of scholarly and practitioner-based perspectives on equitable school organizations, with particular emphasis on how to develop culturally responsive and community oriented systems-level leadership.

EDADM 626X. Equitable School Finance . (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Graduate standing. Examine the equitable management of a school district’s financial responsibilities. Coursework addresses the role of the federal, state, and local governments in educational finance, tax issues, and structures; bonding; budgeting procedures; and financial analysis and accountability. Student attendance required at the annual Iowa School Business Management Academy.

EDADM 635X. Ethical Governance and Policy. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Graduate standing. Explores ethics to support equitable systems-level administrative practice, with attention to the development of personal and professional codes of ethics and social justice. Examine constitutional, statutory, and judicial provisions as a basis for the legal operation of educational institutions which serve school boards, school personnel, students, and communities.

EDUC 203X. A Connected World: Technology for Learning, Creating, and Collaborating. (1-0) Cr. 1. FS. Theories, principles and best practices of utilizing technology for learning. Topics include review of the current and emerging technologies to support creativity, problem solving, and collaboration, with a focus on safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology. Hybrid (online and face-to-face). Satisfactory-Fail only.

EDUC 275X. International Travel Study - Pre-departure Orientation. (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. S. Prereq: Instructor permission required: Participants required to be accepted to international travel study program. Orientation to the international travel study, offered during the semester preceding the trip.

EDUC 303X. Introduction to Educational Technology. (1-0) Cr. 1. FS. Prereq: EDUC 203, Admission to Teacher Education. Introductory course on educational technology for secondary and K-12 teachers. Topics include technology integration, lesson planning with technology, fair use, and equity issues. Hybrid (online and face-to-face). Satisfactory-Fail only.

EDUC 403X. Intermediate Educational Technology. (1-0) Cr. 1. FS. Prereq: EDUC 303, Admission to Teacher Education . Intermediate course on educational technology for secondary and K-12 teachers. Topics include lesson planning with technology and assessment with technology. Students in EDUC 403 will actively participate seminar activities and model technology integration. Hybrid (online and face-to-face). Satisfactory-Fail only.

EDUC 441X. Teaching and Learning with Insects. Cr. arr. Repeatable. F.S. Prereqs: Junior standing. Concurrently enrolled in Block I practicum in Fall and Block II practicum in Spring (Elementary Education). Introduction to the biology and natural and social ecology of insects with a focus on the use of insect inquiry in the K-8 classroom, and to culturally- and linguistically-responsive and ambitious science teaching, as well as community-based participatory or “citizen science” research. In- and out-of-school teaching and educational activities related to insects. Intended for Elementary Education Majors and other students with an interest in engaging learners’ curiosity about the world through insect biology and the relationship between insects, humans, and public health.

EDUC 468T. Pre-Student Teaching Experience II: Elementary. Cr. 2. Repeatable. F.S. Prereq: Admission to teacher education program, successful completion of a Level 2 or Level 3 field experience required. Application of current methods and instructional experiences with children in a supervised elementary classroom outside of Iowa while engaged in other elementary methods courses. Clinical Experience Level 3. Offered on a satisfactory-fail grading basis only.

EDUC 475X. International Travel Study in Education. (Dual-listed with EDUC 575X). Cr. 1-6. SS. Repeatable. Prereqs: EDUC 275X. Program leader should have accepted participating students to the international travel study. Students enrolled in EDUC 575X (graduate level) must have completed 6 graduate credits to be eligible for the course. Seminar-based course for undergraduate and graduate students to develop a better understanding around global issues related to teaching, learning, curriculum, and educational policy through international travel study. 1 to 6 week duration involving study in a country other than the US.

EDUC 480T. Pre-Student Teaching Experience III: Secondary Education. Cr. 2. Repeatable. F.S. Prereq:  Admission to Teacher Education Program, successful completion of a Level 2 or Level 3 field experience. Supervised participation in a 5-12 school setting outside of Iowa. Permission of content program coordinator required prior to enrollment. Clinical Experience Level 3. Offered on a satisfactory-fail grading basis only.

EDUC 510X. Foundations of Game-based Learning. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with HCI 510X). Prereq: 12 graduate credits. Theories, principles and best practices of utilizing games in educational environments. Topics include the theoretical foundations of learning games and game play, identity development in online environments, and assessment of learning in and out of games.

EDUC 521X. Introduction to the Teaching and Learning of Mathematics and Science. Cr. 3. SS. Prereq:  Admission into graduate program secondary mathematics or science education . Provides future secondary teachers with opportunities to explore learning theories and approaches for teaching mathematics and science, especially those related to constructivism and social constructivism. Opportunities to understand how students learn mathematics and science and how to assess secondary students’ understanding in these content areas. Includes 12-hours (2 full days) of classroom observation in a nearby middle or high school and may include other practical experiences in teaching math and science.

EDUC 569X. Critical Disciplinary Literacy across the Content Areas . (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Graduate classification. Guided by frameworks of critical literacies and sociocultural theories of disciplinary literacy, students investigate the specialized and unique histories, discourses, practices, norms, and skills of select disciplines/programs/fields. Course is intended/differentiated for graduate students from various disciplines/programs/fields. Students will design their own inquiry-based critical disciplinary literacy research project.

EDUC 575X. International Travel Study in Education. (Dual-listed with EDUC 475X). Cr. 1-6. SS. Repeatable. Prereqs: EDUC 275X. Program leader should have accepted participating students to the international travel study. Students enrolled in EDUC 575X (graduate level) must have completed 6 graduate credits to be eligible for the course. Seminar-based course for undergraduate and graduate students to develop a better understanding around global issues related to teaching, learning, curriculum, and educational policy through international travel study. 1 to 6 week duration involving study in a country other than the US.

EDUC 608X. Social Media and Education. (Cross-listed with HCI 608X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 12 graduate credits. Increase understanding of how social media is changing traditional concepts of identity, literacy, citizenship and more. Develop an online social presence through active social media participation.

EEOB 546X. Computational Skills for Biological Data. (Cross-listed with BCB 546X). (1-2) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: Graduate student status or permission of the instructor. Computational skills necessary for biologists working with big data sets. UNIX commands, scripting in R and Python, version control using Git and GitHub, and use of high performance computing clusters. Combination of lectures and computational exercises.

EL PS 590X. Special Topics. Cr. 1-4. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Prereq: Graduate standing . Independent study on specific topics arranged with an instructor.

EL PS 593X. Workshop. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Prereq: Graduate standing. Intensive, concentrated exposure to a topic involving educational leadership, social justice, or educational policy.

EL PS 650AX. Doctoral Seminar: Practitioner-Scholar Leadership . Cr. 1. Prereq: Graduate status. Orientation and overview of the P-20 Educational Doctoral Program. Begin to explore how a P-20 systems level leader can establish a vision for socially-just, equitable, and excellent learning environments for all stakeholders and community members. One-day Seminar focuses on Practitioner-Scholar Leadership beginning with the exploration of scholarly and practitioner-based perspectives on equitable school organizations, with particular emphasis on how to develop culturally responsive and community-oriented systems-level leadership across the P-20 continuum.

EL PS 650BX. Doctoral Seminar: Aligning P-20 Educational Contexts . Cr. 1. Prereq: Admission to the Education Doctorate program. Discuss contextual factors which influence student learning, persistence, and achievement across P-20 educational systems. Explore how historical, cultural, political, and economic issues developed locally and globally to create contemporary American P-20 educational systems.

EL PS 650CX. Doctoral Seminar: Data Informed Evidence-Based Decision-Making . Cr. 1. Prereq: Admission to the Education Doctorate program Principles of data-informed, evidence-based practices in P-20 settings. Guide students in their ability to arrive at professional, managerial and instructional decisions informed by different methods and frameworks that align to their institutional context.

EL PS 651X. Social Foundations of P-20 Schooling in the United States . (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Admission into ED.D. Introduction to the historical and contemporary landscape of P-20 schooling in the United States. Emphasis on topics and tensions in the relationship between school and society (e.g. equity of access to education and competing purposes of education) and the implications of these topics and tensions for teaching, learning, and leadership in schools across the P-20 continuum.

EL PS 653X. Contemporary Issues of Equity and Diversity . Cr. 3. Prereq: Admission to the Education Doctorate program . Contemporary issues of equity and diversity across P-20+ school settings. Relevant history, philosophy, theory, and research is highlighted to understand how equity and diversity is conceptualized, addressed, researched, and contextualized at micro and macro levels of educational settings.

EL PS 690X. Advanced Special Topics. Cr. 1-4. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Prereq: Graduate standing . Independent study on specific topics of an advanced nature, arranged with an instructor.

ENSCI 665X. Digital Soil Mapping. (Cross-listed with AGRON 665X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. In depth readings and discussion of methods applied to produce soil maps using digital geospatial data and geographic information systems. Issues considered will include complications of scale, connecting statistically identified patterns with soil formation processes, and how to best deliver soil information to diverse audiences.

ENGL 169X. A Linguistic Approach to Taboo Language . (Cross-listed with LING 169X). (3-0) Cr. 3. SS. An introduction to linguistics through the study of taboo language. Topics such as etymology of taboo words, psychological effects of swearing, cross-cultural taboos, and censorship. Students sensitive to explicit language or those with only a non-scholarly interest in taboo language are discouraged from enrolling .

ENGL 321X. Creating Novel Solutions for Language Learning. (Cross-listed with LING 321X). (1-0) Cr. 1. Analysis of markets and unmet needs for language learning tools. Development of entrepreneurial knowledge and disposition through innovative project proposals for prospective investors, users, or other participants.

ENGL 517X. Corpus Linguistics. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with  LING 517X). Prereq: ENGL 511 or LING 511 or an introductory course in Linguistics. Corpus linguistics methods of language analysis, including corpus design, construction and annotation; data in corpus studies; tools and methods of analysis. Corpus methods applied in vocabulary, grammar, register and dialect variation, language change, pragmatics, semantics, stylistics, language learning and teaching, and language testing.

ENGL 536X. Preparing Publishable Thesis Chapters. (Cross-listed with GR ST 536X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Reporting original research results within the norms for writing of a student's discipline. Emphasis on preparing thesis/dissertation chapters that will be both acceptable to the Graduate College and ready for submission to a refereed journal in the student's discipline. Focus on reporting results from student-generated original research, norms for discourse within disciplines, and how thesis chapters differ from journal manuscripts.

ENGL 552X. Workshop: Scriptwriting. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. F. Prereqs: ENGL 550 and graduate classification. Majors other than MFA in Creative Writing and Environment need permission of instructor. Individual projects in dramatic writing. Focus on writing for stage, screen, and/or new media. Readings in dramatic literature. Discussion of elements such as plot, character, dialogue, structure, theme, and visual storytelling.

ENGR 430X. Entrepreneurial Product Engineering. (Cross-listed with I E 430X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Junior Classification. Process of innovative product development in both entrepreneurial and intra-preneurial settings. Define, prototype and validate a product concept based on competitive bench-marking, market positioning and customer requirement evaluation in a target market into a product design that is consistent with defined business goals and strategies. Combination of lecture, discussion, problem solving and case study review.

ENGR 434X. Entrepreneurial Product Engineering Design Project. (Cross-listed with I E 434X). (1-4) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: I E 430 or ENGR 430. Open-ended design project related to creating, validating and launching a new engineered product into the marketplace. Fundamentals related to launching new engineered products in an Entrepreneurial way. Students submit new product ideas or select from a list of company supplied ideas. Application of engineering design principles including product definition, competitive evaluation, requirements evaluation, product design, manufacturing design, manufacturing costing, prototype creation, field validation, user evaluation.

ENGR 538X. Foundations of Engineering Education. (Cross-listed with HG ED 538X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Engineering graduate students or instructor permission required. Introduction to the field of engineering education, with an emphasis on engineering education history, existing challenges, teaching and learning pedagogies and theories, research opportunities, and research methodologies. The course goal is to develop students as scholars and to have students think critically about engineering and education. Students will apply the knowledge gained from this course to propose a research project related to their own discipline. The proposal is intended to help students learn and apply the key elements of engineering education research. This course is intended for students with a variety of interests and career goals, including those interested in learning to conduct engineering education research, exploring research discoveries about teaching and learning, and engaging with the engineering education community.

ENGR 693X.  Entrepreneurship for Graduate Students in Science and Engineering . (Cross-listed with AGRON 693X, BCB 693X, E E 693X, GENET 693X, and M E 693X). (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.  Prereq: Graduate student status and completion of at least one semester of graduate coursework. Understanding key topics of starting a technology based company, from development of technology-led idea to early-stage entrepreneurial business. Concepts discussed include: entrepreneurship basics, starting a business, funding your business, protecting your technology/business IP. Subject matter experts and successful, technology-based entrepreneurs will provide real world examples from their experience with entrepreneurship. Learn about the world class entrepreneurship ecosystem at ISU and Central Iowa.

ENSCI 270X. Geospatial Technologies. (Cross-listed with AGRON 270X). (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Concepts and tools for acquiring, managing, analyzing, and displaying geographic information, including GIS, remote sensing, spatial analysis, and cartography. Focus on applications in biological, ecological, environmental, and agricultural sciences.

ENT 435X. Entomology Field Trip. (Cross-listed with A ECL 435X). (1-6) Cr. 2. Repeatable. Irr. S. Irr SS. Prereqs: BIOL 312 (or equivalent) and permission of instructor; ENT 370 or ENT 425 (or equivalent) recommended. Field trip to study insects of major terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Location and duration vary.

ENTSP 371X. Entrepreneurship and Accounting Information . (Cross-listed with ACCT 371X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: ACCT 284. Accounting information recording, dissemination, and use by entrepreneurs. Introduces pro forma financials, venture capital, private equity, and state and federal regulations for business creation and formation. Other topics include intrapreneurship, intellectual property, information privacy, cybersecurity, and internal controls, including managing the risk of embezzlement.

ENTSP 431X. Small Business Finance Decisions. (Cross-listed with FIN 431X). (3-0) Cr . 3. S. Prereq: FIN 301. Integrative nature of small business financial decisions, from basic historical financial analysis to financial projections and valuation unique to small business. Utilize planning/valuation to reconcile the optimal exit date for the small business owner. Examination of this integrative approach through case study. Emphasis on practical application with a decision orientation. Group project working with a small business owner and related advisors/bankers to develop a plan that focuses on an optimal exit strategy.

ENTSP 606X. Historical Foundations of Entrepreneurship Research. (Cross-listed with MGMT 606X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Enrollment in the PhD Program. Seminal readings, theoretical perspectives, and historical roots of Entrepreneurship research. A broad variety of core foundational theories, perspectives, and approaches are discussed.

ENV S 140L. Climate and Society Laboratory. (Cross-listed with MTEOR 140L/AGRON 140L/GEOL 140L). (0-2) Cr. 1. F.S. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in MTEOR/AGRON/ENV S/GEOL 140X or Instructor Permission . Analyze and interpret weather and climate data. Relationship between climate and society based on data and case studies from the real world. The climate system in the past and present based on climate data. The role of climate in shaping society and distribution of resources. Natural and human driven climate change. Carbon and water footprints. Global and regional scale impacts of climate change in the 21st century. Feasible solutions to adapting to and mitigating climate change.

ENV S 140X. Climate and Society. (Cross-listed with MTEOR 140X/AGRON 140X/GEOL 140X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. The climate system of our planet. How nature and our actions alter the existing energy balance leading to climate change. Past climates on our planet. The influence of climate on society and resource availability during the Holocene (~ 11,000 years ago to present) with focus on changes post industrial revolution. Significant climate events that have altered our way of life in the past. Projected changes in future climate and potential impacts on society, environment and resources. Adaption to and mitigation of climate change.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

EVENT 203X. Event Management Sophomore Mentorship. (2-1) Cr. 2. S. Prereqs: Sophomore classification; AESHM 113; EVENT 271; by application only. Event Management sophomore students will be paired with a professional mentor in the event industry. Students will meet in the class and individually with their professional mentor throughout the spring semester. Students will be assessed on their experience through reflection, presentation, and mentor evaluation.

EVENT 486X. Advanced Event Production. (0-6) Cr. 3. Repeatable. F. Prereqs: AESHM 113, EVENT 271, and EVENT 371. Advanced application event management. Provide leadership and direction for production of an annual conference including developing a budget, publicity, securing talent, advertising, choreography, staging, lighting, and food.

EVENT 561X. Advanced Topics in Event Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Graduate level standing. Advanced meeting and event planning topics including event strategy, event risk and security management, event financial management, event design, event project management, and event tourism strategy.

F

FIN 427X. Fixed Income Securities. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: FIN 320. Valuation of fixed income securities, including pricing conventions, term structure of interest rates, default, duration, and hedging of interest rate risk with derivatives. Analysis of bond market sectors, including treasury, agency, corporate, sovereign, municipal, and residential mortgage bonds.

FIN 431X. Small Business Finance Decisions. (Cross-listed with ENTSP 431X). (3-0) Cr . 3. S. Prereq: FIN 301. Integrative nature of small business financial decisions, from basic historical financial analysis to financial projections and valuation unique to small business. Utilize planning/valuation to reconcile the optimal exit date for the small business owner. Examination of this integrative approach through case study. Emphasis on practical application with a decision orientation. Group project working with a small business owner and related advisors/bankers to develop a plan that focuses on an optimal exit strategy.

FIN 455X. Predictive Analytics in Finance. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: FIN 301, STAT 326. Introduction to Financial Analytics concepts and tools. Basic statistical/computing skills, analytical thinking, and business acumen. Develop practical data analytic skills based on building real analytic applications on real data.

FIN 456X. Financial Modeling. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: ACCT 285, FIN 301 and STAT 326. Applying computers to business applications especially using Excel in finance related work.

FIN 491X. International Study Course in Global Capital Markets. Cr. 3. S. Prereq: FIN 301. European capital markets and multinational corporate finance with focus on banking, capital markets, and corporate finance in a particular European country. Exposure to European capital markets, the European Monetary Union and the banking system. Current and historical banking practices within the EU and how they changed since the EMU implementation. Understand financial decisions faced by firms located in the EU. Study banks, institutions, and companies in Europe to gain specific knowledge of their practices. Learn about the culture and general economy of Europe during the in country visit.

FIN 541X. Analytics in Finance and Insurance. (Cross-listed with MIS 541X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Introduction to Business Analytics (BA) in finance and the insurance industry. The concepts and tools discussed in this course, to be followed and complemented by more advanced courses in the area. Basic analytical thinking and business acumen focusing on applications from finance and insurance. Practical data analytic skills based on building real analytic applications on real data.

FRNCH 203X. Intermediate French Grammar and Conversation. (4-0) Cr. 4. Prereq: FRNCH 201 or equivalent. Practice in oral communication within the context of French language and cultures for professions. Best-suited for students with a solid foundation in basic French grammar. Only one of FRNCH 202 or 203 may count toward graduation.

FS HN 220X. American Food and Culture. (3.0) Cr. 3. F. American cuisine reflects the history of the U.S. It is the unique blend of diverse groups of people from around the world, including indigenous Native American Indians, Africans, Asians, Europeans, Pacific Islanders, and South Americans. Explore factors that impact the American Cuisine of today including diverse ethnic and cultural group influences, historical events related to food diversity in the U.S., and agriculture and industrial impacts on food production. Practical knowledge and basic food preparation techniques related to the U.S. food system and trends. Class sessions will include lectures, class discussions and Preview-Reflection Assessments, audio-visual presentations, and Tasting Immersion Activities.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

FS HN 301X. Nutrigenomics: From Basic Science to Translational Impact . (2-0) Cr. 1. F.S. 8 week course. Introduction to the concepts of nutrigenomics and how it affects us as producers and consumers of food, as well as the implications for human diseases, including inherited diseases, metabolic disease, cancer, neurodevelopment and neurodegenerative diseases. The potential impact of personalized nutrition on health maintenance and chronic disease prevention, the potential of personalized medicine and full genome sequencing, and the ethical implications of this knowledge. Students will be expected to explore a sub-topic within the context of this course and provide a 2-minute oral presentation.

FS HN 430X. U.S. Health Systems and Policy. (Dual-listed with FS HN 530X). (2.0) Cr. 2. S. Prereqs: Senior or graduate classification, or permission of instructor . Introduction to public policy for health care professionals. Emphasis on understanding on the role of the practitioner for participating in the policy process, interpreting government policies and programs such as Medicare and Medicaid, determining reimbursement rates for eligible services, and understanding licensure and accreditation issues. Discussion and exploration of federal, state and professional policy-relevant resources.

FS HN 482X. Fundamentals of Packaging. (Dual-listed with FS HN 582X). (2-3) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: STAT 101, 104 or 105. The study of materials, design, processes, performance and safety of packaging. Applied experiences include: packaging design, fabrication and performance testing for packaged products.

FS HN 508X. Consumer Perceptions and Nutrition Communication. (2-0) Cr. 2. S.SS. Prereqs: Enrollment in MPP-D (Master's of Professional Practice - Dietetics) Program. Examination of current consumer food and nutrition trends. Critical analysis of consumer perceptions relative to current research base. Use of the various media (news release/story, infographic, print publication, YouTube video) to create effective nutrition messages for consumers

FS HN 530X. U.S. Health Systems and Policy. (Dual-listed with FS HN 430X). (2.0) Cr. 2. S. Prereqs: Senior or graduate classification, or permission of instructor . Introduction to public policy for health care professionals. Emphasis on understanding on the role of the practitioner for participating in the policy process, interpreting government policies and programs such as Medicare and Medicaid, determining reimbursement rates for eligible services, and understanding licensure and accreditation issues. Discussion and exploration of federal, state and professional policy-relevant resources.

FS HN 537X. Leardership and Management in Dietetics. (4-0) Cr. 2. SS. Prereq: Enrollment in ISU Master of Professional Practice in Dietetics. Application of leadership and management theories and approaches relevant to dietetics practice. Use of self-reflection and self-assessment to assist in recognition and development of leadership behaviors.

FS HN 582X. Fundamentals of Packaging. (Dual-listed with FS HN 482X). (2-3) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: STAT 101, 104 or 105. The study of materials, design, processes, performance and safety of packaging. Applied experiences include: packaging design, fabrication and performance testing for packaged products.

FS HN 589X. Systems Neuroscience: Brain, Behavior, and Nutrition-Related Integrative Physiology. (Cross-listed with NUTRS 589X, GERON 589X, NEURO 589X, PSYCH 589X). (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereqs: Graduate standing, or undergraduate with consent of instructor. Structural, functional, and biochemical aspects of brain and non-motor behavior across the human lifespan. Types of neuroimaging used to assess the brain. Current research is leveraged to gauge how nutrition, diseases related to nutrition, and associated physiological processes influence the brain, particularly for common developmental, psychological, and neurological disorders.

FS HN 653X. Food and Agricultural Traceability. Cr. 3. SS. Prereq: Enrollment in The Ivy Executive MBA program within the Ivy College of Business at Iowa State University. Current issues and concepts of food and agricultural product traceability in the U.S., from production to consumption. Food types, microbial agents of concern, adulterants, disease investigations, risk analysis, risk mitigation, prevention and regulatory policy and advocacy. Travel to Washington, D.C.