Experimental Courses 2019-2020, G-O

G H I J K L M N O

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GEOL 140L. Climate and Society Laboratory. (Cross-listed with MTEOR 140L/ENV S 140L/AGRON 140L). (0-2) Cr. 1. F.S. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in MTEOR/AGRON/ENV S/GEOL 140X or Instructor Permission . Analyze and interpret weather and climate data. Relationship between climate and society based on data and case studies from the real world. The climate system in the past and present based on climate data. The role of climate in shaping society and distribution of resources. Natural and human driven climate change. Carbon and water footprints. Global and regional scale impacts of climate change in the 21st century. Feasible solutions to adapting to and mitigating climate change.

GEOL 140X. Climate and Society. (Cross-listed with MTEOR 140X/AGRON 140X/ENV S 140X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. The climate system of our planet. How nature and our actions alter the existing energy balance leading to climate change. Past climates on our planet. The influence of climate on society and resource availability during the Holocene (~ 11,000 years ago to present) with focus on changes post industrial revolution. Significant climate events that have altered our way of life in the past. Projected changes in future climate and potential impacts on society, environment and resources. Adaption to and mitigation of climate change.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

GENET 693X.  Entrepreneurship for Graduate Students in Science and Engineering . (Cross-listed with AGRON 693X, BCB 693X, E E 693X, ENGR 693X, and M E 693X). (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.  Prereq: Graduate student status and completion of at least one semester of graduate coursework. Understanding key topics of starting a technology based company, from development of technology-led idea to early-stage entrepreneurial business. Concepts discussed include: entrepreneurship basics, starting a business, funding your business, protecting your technology/business IP. Subject matter experts and successful, technology-based entrepreneurs will provide real world examples from their experience with entrepreneurship. Learn about the world class entrepreneurship ecosystem at ISU and Central Iowa.

GERON 589X. Systems Neuroscience: Brain, Behavior, and Nutrition-Related Integrative Physiology. (Cross-listed with NUTRS 589X, FS HN 589X, NEURO 589X, PSYCH 589X). (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereqs: Graduate standing, or undergraduate with consent of instructor. Structural, functional, and biochemical aspects of brain and non-motor behavior across the human lifespan. Types of neuroimaging used to assess the brain. Current research is leveraged to gauge how nutrition, diseases related to nutrition, and associated physiological processes influence the brain, particularly for common developmental, psychological, and neurological disorders.

GLOBE 330X. Global Health Disparities. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Junior classification. Historical and contemporary factors contributing to disparities in health outcomes for persons disadvantaged by income, location, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and abilities. Analysis and evaluation of health promotional materials, such as campaigns, and community-based interventions focused on reducing global health disparities .
Meets U. S. Diversity Requirement.

GLOBE 360X. Global Health. (Cross-listed with V MPM 360X and MICRO 360X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Biol 211. Global Health explores health and its determinants across the world with a commitment to the many disciplines and variables that influence health. The course will stress the interconnectedness of humans, animals, and the environment, with emphasis on poor countries. The course is designed to challenge the typical understanding of what impacts health and to stimulate the student to take an entrepreneurial approach to finding solutions. Current events will be a major focus of the class. Within the context of health and disease, topics will include poverty, infectious diseases, gender, social media, climate change, animal health, agriculture, and more. Each student will complete one case study on a topic related to global health. Outside reading and films will be required for each class meeting. There will be four exams. Students will also be expected to sign up for Twitter and use Black Board.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

GLOBE 493X. Workshop in Global Resource Systems. (2-0) Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Prereq: Permission of Instructor. Workshop experience in selected topics in global resource systems.

GLOBE 496B. Global Resource Systems Domestic Travel Study . Cr. 1-4. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Prereq: Permission of Instructor . Limited enrollment. Extended domestic field trips to study global resource systems topics. Location and duration of trips will vary. Pre-trip sessions arranged. Trip expenses paid by student.

GR ST 536X. Preparing Publishable Thesis Chapters. (Cross-listed with ENGL 536X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Reporting original research results within the norms for writing of a student's discipline. Emphasis on preparing thesis/dissertation chapters that will be both acceptable to the Graduate College and ready for submission to a refereed journal in the student's discipline. Focus on reporting results from student-generated original research, norms for discourse within disciplines, and how thesis chapters differ from journal manuscripts.

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H SCI 250X. Intergroup Dialogue. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: H SCI 150 or permission by instructor or program coordinator. Intergroup Dialogue is a "face to face" facilitated conversation between members of two or more social identity groups that strives to create new levels of understanding, relating and action. Intergroup Dialogue is based in the philosophies of the democratic and popular education.

H SCI 398X. Cooperative Education. Cr. R. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Prereq: Permission of CHS Career Services. For use for cooperative education students seeking full-time status while on internship. Students must register for this course prior to commencing each work period. No more than three credits may be taken in addition to H SCI 398 during any given semester. Course cannot be used to fulfill degree requirements. Therefore, this cannot be used for a required, academic internship. Satisfactory-fail only.

HCI 510X. Foundations of Game-based Learning. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with EDUC 510X). Prereq: 12 graduate credits. Theories, principles and best practices of utilizing games in educational environments. Topics include the theoretical foundations of learning games and game play, identity development in online environments, and assessment of learning in and out of games.

HCI 530X. Perspectives in HCI. (3-0). Cr. 3. SS. An exploration of different perspectives in HCI that covers: inclusive and humane design; the intersection of technology and race, gender, age, and class; technology around the world; the impact of technology on democracy; social engineering and cybersecurity; and other relevant topics students would like to explore.

HCI 560X. Learn to Speak AI. (3-1). Cr. 3. SS. Prereq: Programming skills are useful but not essential.  Concepts from the design and analysis of algorithms in Artificial Intelligence. Recap mathematical knowledge and apply to learning how several popular learning algorithms work. Illustrate technical issues addressed by specialists in the field.

HCI 584X. Python Application Development in HCI. (3-0). Cr. 3. SS. Prereqs: Working knowledge of Python equivalent to HCI 574. Must be enrolled in the HCI graduate program. Completion or concurrent enrollment in the HCI Design requirement. Implement Python code and write design documents (“specs”) and complement their code with sufficiently detailed documentation in development of a large Python project of the student's choosing. Typical development process: idea, specification, prototyping and implementation (including debugging, testing, refactoring) and documentation and result in a demo-able final product. Fulfills the implementation requirement of the HCI program.

HCI 608X. Social Media and Education. (Cross-listed with EDUC 608X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: 12 graduate credits. Increase understanding of how social media is changing traditional concepts of identity, literacy, citizenship and more. Develop an online social presence through active social media participation.

HD FS 384X. Family Insurance Planning. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. St rategies for managing family financial risk with insurance. Emphasis on communication and planning process and the use of risk mitigation and insurance within families. Risk analysis and management within the comprehensive family financial planning process.

HD FS 387X. Applying Evidence Based Practices in Human Services . (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: HD FS 224, 226, 227, 234, or Psych 230 . Exploration of evidence-based practices in human services. Exposure to and practice of the skills required to work with individuals and families in engagement, needs assessment, development of human services interventions, and data-based progress monitoring evaluation phases of human services. Practical strategies such as motivational interviewing and behavioral techniques will be covered.

HD FS 481X. International Studies in HD FS: Group Study. Cr. 1-3. S.SS. Repeatable. Prereq: Permission by application. Limited enrollment. Supervised international study experiences in Human Development and Family Studies. Countries vary.

HG ED 538X. Foundations of Engineering Education. (Cross-listed with ENGR 538X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Engineering graduate students or instructor permission required. Introduction to the field of engineering education, with an emphasis on engineering education history, existing challenges, teaching and learning pedagogies and theories, research opportunities, and research methodologies. The course goal is to develop students as scholars and to have students think critically about engineering and education. Students will apply the knowledge gained from this course to propose a research project related to their own discipline. The proposal is intended to help students learn and apply the key elements of engineering education research. This course is intended for students with a variety of interests and career goals, including those interested in learning to conduct engineering education research, exploring research discoveries about teaching and learning, and engaging with the engineering education community.

HG ED 551X. Organization and Administration in Intercollegiate Athletics. (3-0) Cr. 3. SS. Explores how intercollegiate athletics contributes to the aims higher education and how athletics can be used to perpetuate and/or contest social inequalities related to race, class, and gender. Surveys topics related to the organization and administration of intercollegiate athletics such as governance, leadership, policy, and finance.

HG ED 663X. Community College Students. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Comprehensive understanding of students in American community colleges while enhancing research skills and a scholar-practitioner approach to working with students. Examine the curricula in place that serve a diverse student population with different educational objectives. Examine student types found in comprehensive community colleges including transfer, career & technical, adult basic education, and English language learners.

HG ED 673X. Diversity and Inclusion in Higher Education. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.  Critical understanding of issues of diversity and inclusion in higher education. There are multiple dimensions to diversity and inclusion, far too complicated to cover in one course. Therefore, the goal of this seminar is to provide a general understanding of theory, research, and practices related to diversity and inclusion issues. Considers intersectional perspectives of diversity and inclusion within higher education.

HIST 211X. Ancient Empires: From Sargon to Caesar. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Development of empires in the Near East and Mediterranean from the Akkadians to the fall of Rome. Discussion of the Hittites, Assyrians, Persians, Athenians, Macedonians (including the conquests of Alexander the Great), Carthaginians, and Romans; examination of imperialism as well as the social, cultural, and economic consequences of empire.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

HIST 310X. Africa to 1880. (3-0) Cr. 3. (Cross-listed with AF AM 310X). Survey of the history of African societies, cultures and civilizations from earliest times to 1880. Evolution of states across the continent; social, economic, political, and cultural developments; nature and consequences of African interactions and relationship with Europeans.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

HIST 364X. The Mythic Wild West . (3-0) Cr. 3. SS. Examination of the history of the mythic American West, including how people have thought about the region, the myths that emerged from the West, and the role the mythical West played in the formation of American identity.

HORT 132X. Wedding and Event Floral Design . (1-2) Cr. 2. Prereq: HORT 131. Principles of design and proper mechanics for ceremony flowers, reception flowers, personal flowers, bridal bouquets, and event florals. Flower and plant materials that are commonly used in the event industry. Plan, design, cost, order, and create florals for a wedding, then present as the final project for implementation.

HORT 233X. House Plants and Interiorscaping. (1-2) Cr. 2. Basic introduction to indoor houseplants and interiorscapes. Understand plant selection, identification, maintenance, and problem solving. Learn current houseplant trends, commercial interior plant design, and installation. A beneficial course for students with an interest in house plants, retail plant sales, Interiorscaping, event design, or gardening.

HORT 571X. Vegetable Production and Management. (1-0) Cr. 2. (Dual-listed with HORT 471). Prereq: HORT 221. Principles of vegetable production with emphasis on sustainable production practices, market outlets, business aspects, and risk management. Topics will include crop classification and rotation; planting methods; crop climatic conditions, physiological growth and development; soil, water, and pest management; cover cropping; season extension strategies; harvest and postharvest management and marketing. Involves visits to growers fields to observe/experience there production enterprise.

HORT 571L. Vegetable Production and Management Lab . (0-3) Cr. 1. (Dual-listed with HORT 471LX). Prereq: Junior or Senior status and concurrent enrollment in HORT 471/HORT 571X is required . Hands-on training in the area of vegetable crop production. Opportunity to grow a variety of vegetables in a heated greenhouse and also conduct greenhouse and lab experiments. The lab also involves visits to vegetable production sites in Iowa to observe/experience and learn from growers and other agricultural professionals .

HSP M 301X. Hospitality Revenue Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. An overview of the revenue management in the lodging and food service industry will be provided. Emphasis will be placed on the application of analytical and forecasting techniques to formulate and implement pricing strategies in responses to daily operation complexities.

HSP M 385X. Beer and Brewed Beverages in the Hospitality Industry. (2-0) Cr. 1. F.S. Prereqs: HSP M 383 or concurrent enrollment. Must be at least 21 years old. Introduction to history and methods of production for a variety of beer, cider, perry, mead, sake and other brewed alcoholic beverages. Beverage tasting and sensory analysis; product knowledge; and service techniques related to the beverage and hospitality industry. Field trip.

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I E 242X. Selected Topics in Probability and Statistics. Cr. 1. SS. Prereq:  Credit or enrollment in Stat 305 . Conditional probability; Bayes’ theorem examples and applications; joint, marginal and conditional distributions; counting, permutations, combinations; reliability examples; one-way ANOVA; and multiple linear regression.

I E 420X. Engineering Problem Solving with R. (Dual-listed with I E 520X). Cr. 3. S. Prereq: An introductory statistics course: Stat 231 or equivalent. Statistical analysis and engineering problem solving using R programming language. Data manipulation. Exploratory data analysis. Statistical quality assurance. Basic statistical analysis. R Markdown. Simulation. Conditional expressions, loops, and functions. Matrices. High level data visualizations. Data extraction from text. Optimization. Logistic regression. High performance computing tools. Project required for graduate credits.

I E 422X. Design and Analysis Applications for System Improvement. (1-6) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: Credit in I E 222, I E 271, I E 305, I E 361, and credit or enrollment in I E 413; OR permission of instructor. A team-based design project that is large and open-ended drawing from previous IE courses. Application of engineering design including process improvement methods to produce solutions while considering realistic constraints . Can be used as capstone design experience or as engineering topic elective.

I E 430X. Entrepreneurial Product Engineering. (Cross-listed with ENGR 430X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Junior Classification. Process of innovative product development in both entrepreneurial and intra-preneurial settings. Define, prototype and validate a product concept based on competitive bench-marking, market positioning and customer requirement evaluation in a target market into a product design that is consistent with defined business goals and strategies. Combination of lecture, discussion, problem solving and case study review.

I E 434X. Entrepreneurial Product Engineering Design Project. (Cross-listed with ENGR 434X). (1-4) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: I E 430 or ENGR 430. Open-ended design project related to creating, validating and launching a new engineered product into the marketplace. Fundamentals related to launching new engineered products in an Entrepreneurial way. Students submit new product ideas or select from a list of company supplied ideas. Application of engineering design principles including product definition, competitive evaluation, requirements evaluation, product design, manufacturing design, manufacturing costing, prototype creation, field validation, user evaluation.

I E 437X. Reliability and Safety Engineering. (Dual-listed with I E 537). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: STAT 231 or STAT 305 or STAT 587 . Mathematical basics for dealing with reliability data, theory, and analysis. Bayesian reliability analysis. Engineering ethics in safety evaluations. Case studies of accidents in large technological systems. Fault and event tree analysis

I E 442X. Welding Engineering. (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: MAT E 215 or MAT E 273. Material and their weldability. Arc welding processes including SMAW, GMAW and GTAW. Important process characteristics including power supply, electrodes, and shielding gases. Weldment design including types of welds, joint designs, avoiding quality issues, residual stress and heat affected zone. Safety considerations during welding.

I E 452X. Introduction To Systems Engineering And Analysis. (Cross-listed with AER E 452X). (3-0) Cr. 3. SS.  Prereq: Junior Classification in an Engineering Major. Principles of systems engineering to include problem statement formulation, stakeholder analysis, requirements definition, system architecture and concept generation, system integration and interface management, verification and validation, and system commissioning and decommissioning operations. Introduction to discrete event simulation processes. Students will work in groups to propose, research, and present findings for a systems engineering topic of current relevance.

I E 445X. Rapid Prototyping and Manufacturing. (Dual-listed with I E 545). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: I E 248, Mat E 273 or similar manufacturing and materials course. Introduction to rapid prototyping processes and rapid manufacturing methods. Operating principles and characteristics of current rapid prototyping processes. Principles of Additive Manufacturing (AM), methods and systems. Selection criteria for processes based on model and test requirements. Rapid methods in manufacturing processes and rapid tooling.

I E 463X. Introduction to Engineering and Systems Management. (3-0). Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: STAT 231 or STAT 305 or equivalent; upperclassman standing and permission of instructor. Engineering and systems management topics for the undergraduate student including challenges and expectations of a junior engineering manager. Probability applications to project management, issues associated in working with and supporting various personnel, basic financial calculations, earned value management, and tools that are useful for the engineering manager. Case studies involving leadership and ethics, and a group project required.

I E 520X. Engineering Problem Solving with R. (Dual-listed with I E 420X). Cr. 3. S. Prereq: An introductory statistics course: Stat 231 or equivalent. Statistical analysis and engineering problem solving using R programming language. Data manipulation. Exploratory data analysis. Statistical quality assurance. Basic statistical analysis. R Markdown. Simulation. Conditional expressions, loops, and functions. Matrices. High level data visualizations. Data extraction from text. Optimization. Logistic regression. High performance computing tools. Project required for graduate credits.

I E 523X. Lean Material Flow Systems. (3-0) Cr. 3. Irr. S. Prereq: I E 413 or equivalent, and I E 222 or permission of instructor. T he application of Lean practices in the areas of material flow systems, including inventory management, both between facilities and within facilities (warehousing, distribution, and supply chains). Simulation of material handling with process improvement alternatives.

I E 544X. Micro/Nano Scale Additive Printing. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: I E 348 or equivalent manufacturing engineering course. Introduction of physical theory, design, analysis, fabrication, and characterization of micro/nano scale fabrication and manufacturing systems; introduction of micro/nano scale additive manufacturing; and deep understanding of additive printing for micro/nano scale applications. Focus on the fabrication/manufacturing of important types of microstructures used in micro/nano devices using additive printing, and the techniques and tools used to characterize them. Students are expected to finish a team projected related applying additive printing experimentally or theoretically to the design of a sensor.

I E 578X. Human-Centered Design and Manufacturing. (2-2) Cr. 3. 1. Prereq: Graduate Student Standing. Physical and psychological factors and the use of creativity and 3D printing in the product design lifecycle. Investigation and discussion of creativity, rapid prototyping, machinability design principles, human-centered design approaches, engineering creativity analyses, product design testing, and human factors methods in product design evaluation. Laboratory assignments related to creativity, engineering design, manufacturing, human-centered design, rapid prototyping, product analysis, and ergonomic testing.

I E 592X. Advanced Analytics Projects . (1-2) Cr. 3. Prereq: Graduate standing in Industrial Engineering or permission of instructor . Practical experience in data analytics and decision modeling, along with communication and teamwork, through the development and completion of an industry project. Application of descriptive and prescriptive analytics methods to formulate and solve a complex engineering analytics problem. Development of decision support skills including problem definition, model building, data visualization, and extraction of managerial insights.

I E 672X. Human Factors in Automation Design. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Graduate classification. Concepts in human-automation systems, including levels of automation, types of automation, and level of control. Implications of how adaptive automation affects error, trust, workload, situation awareness, and performance. Understand how human operators are affected by automation implementation in real-world systems. Apply human factors concepts to the design and assessments of human-automation systems.

I E 674X. Upper Extremity Biomechanics. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: I E 571 or equivalent. In-depth investigation and discussion of issues related to upper extremity biomechanics for advanced students in biomechanics, kinesiology and ergonomics. Discussion of the state of the art research techniques and findings. Develop experience in developing research proposals, critically evaluating research manuscripts, and leading scholarly discussions.

IND D 220X. Concept Sketching. (3-1) Cr. 3. F.S. Introduction to fundamentals of sketching for industrial designer. Key aspects of concept sketching: 1) fundamentals of form development, 2) fundamentals of rendering, and 3) fundamentals of user interactions. Hands-on sketching course for industrial designers.

IND D 240X. Application of Digital Tools For Industrial Design . (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Admitted to Industrial Design Program and by permission of the instructor. Introduction of digital applications and workflows through the lens specific to industrial design tasks requisite to the industrial design curriculum and professionally. Emphasizes these tools, towards such tasks, through initial demonstrations of workflows, exercises/project-based practice, and feedback. Includes but not limited to: 1) An overview of the Adobe applications and their integration, 2) Digital tablet-based software, and 3) Online vector and image resources. Provides foundational skills for each subsequent years’ course deliverables.

IND D 370X. Electronics Prototyping and Design for Non-Engineers. (1-4) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: Sophomore standing or above. Physics 101 or equivalent. In this course, we aim to provide electronic prototyping capabilities to students beyond the engineering realm. Our efforts will be directed towards providing non-engineering students an experience through the stages of design conceptualization; systems level implementation, device prototyping, and testing. Students will build gadgets, interface hardware with computers and make functional electronics units.

IND D 450X. Strategic Design: Integrated Project Development . (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: IND D 201, IND D 202, IND D 301, and IND D 302 or permission of instructor . Development of executable strategies for entrepreneurial, commercial and business efforts. Focus on effective approaches and measures in order to integrate a full cycle of product/service development. Explore how to apply tools of strategic thinking, management and business models in order to deliver an integrated project at job market level.

IND D 580X. Material Culture and Values. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. The meanings of objects from the perspectives of design, material culture, philosophy and cultural studies. Critically examine the role of objects in everyday life. Concepts include: value of things, semiotics, object fetishism, product semantics, consumer value and production labor. Case studies of historic and contemporary objects will be discussed to understand key theoretical concepts and to make meaningful connection between theory and everyday objects.

ITAL 207X. Intensive Intermediate Italian. (4-0) Cr. 4. S. Prereq: ITAL 107, by instructor approval, or by placement test. A communicative approach to intermediate grammar and vocabulary within the context of Italian culture for students whose native language is not Italian. Taught in Italian.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

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JL MC 140X. Identity, Diversity and the Media. (3-0) Cr. 3.  Understand perspectives and biases within journalism, advertising and public relations content, including content shared through social-media platforms. Analyze content generated by others. Topics include media literacy, source evaluation, portrayals of diverse groups, identification of diverse sources and strategies for reducing bias in media work.
Meets U. S. Diversity Requirement.

JL MC 311X. Fundamentals of Mobile Photography. (3-0) Cr. 3. Basic photographic techniques for publication. Includes smartphone operation, lighting, composition and historical overview of photography and use in digital platforms. Basic use of image editing software. Ethical issues involving photo publication in media platforms. A smartphone camera is required. Credit in JL MC 311X may not be applied toward requirements for degree by ARTIS majors.

JL MC 391B. Audio Lab – Creating your own podcast. (Cross-listed with ADVRT, P R). Cr. 1. Podcasting is one of the fastest growing media delivery systems. Work with KHOI radio professionals to create your own podcast. Develop an idea, write, record, edit and market your podcast. Satisfactory-fail only.

JL MC 391E. From Posts to Profits: How to Tackle Social Media Influencer Marketing. (Cross-listed with ADVRT, P R). Cr. 1. According to USA Today, by 2020 brand spending on influencer marketing is expected to hit $101 billion. Students will learn the benefits and how-to of social media influencer engagement from both brand managers and influencers. The course will include interactive sessions with these professionals as well as small-group final projects. Satisfactory-fail only.

JL MC 391F. Political  Reporting: Covering Candidates & Caucuses 2020. (Cross-listed with ADVRT, P R). Cr. 1. According to USA Today, by 2020 brand spending on influencer marketing is expected to hit $101 billion. Students will learn the benefits and how-to of social media influencer engagement from both brand managers and influencers. The course will include interactive sessions with these professionals as well as small-group final projects. Satisfactory-fail only.

JL MC 391G. Organizational  Communication in Times of Change. (Cross-listed with ADVRT, P R). Cr. 1. An organization’s success relies on its ability—and agility—when faced with large-scale changes: mergers and acquisitions, plant closings, downsizing. Professional communicators can play a strategic role in effectively managing change, if they understand why stakeholders resist or embrace change. This course will prepare future public relations professionals to play a valuable and strategic role in today’s turbulent social and business environment. Satisfactory-fail only.

JL MC 391J. The Basics of Video Storytelling using Live Sports Production. Cr. 1. (Cross-listed with ADVRT, P R). Students will get the opportunity to learn the basics of telling the Cyclones brand story using live sports video production. Students will use professional equipment you would see in a video control room or production truck.

JL MC 414X. Digital Newsroom. (1-4) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: Jl MC 344 or 346 or 347; C+ or better in JL MC 202 or JL MC 206.  Fundamentals of digital content creation for use in online news service. Emphasis on reporting, writing and editing skills with additional training in digitizing content. Includes production of photography, slide shows, audio production, video production and blogs.

JL MC 503X. Advanced Communication Research Methods: Quantitative. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: JL MC 502 or equivalent basic research method course; or permission of instructor. In-depth examination of quantitative research methods in journalism and mass communication, including surveys, experiments and media content analyses. Data collection, data analysis and presentation of research findings. Application of quantitative research designs to journalism and mass communication cases.

JL MC 504X. Advanced Communication Research Methods: Qualitative. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: JL MC 502 or equivalent research methods course. In-depth examination of qualitative methods in journalism and mass communication research. Social scientific and humanistic modes of inquiry. Discussions of critical-cultural theory, design and presentation of qualitative studies, and application of qualitative research methods in communication.

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KIN 381A. Study Abroad Experience in Kinesiology: Preparing for the Experience. Cr. 1. Alt. S., offered 2018. Prereq: Undergraduate student majoring in either Kinesiology and Health or Athletic Training, sophomore status or higher, minimum GPA of 2.5 and having completed KIN 252 and 258 by the end of the current spring semester. Prepares student for a study abroad experience focused on the discipline of Kinesiology in another country. Precedes a multi-credit KIN 381B course that is the actual study abroad experience. The prerequisite for this course is having been accepted to study abroad by the Program Director of your intended program. Satisfactory-fail only.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

KIN 381B. Study Abroad Experience In Kinesiology. Cr. 2. Alt. SS., offered 2018. Prereq: KIN 381A and acceptance to study abroad by the Program Director. First-person perspective into the discipline of Kinesiology in another country as well as provide enrichment experiences related to the history and culture of that country. Follows a 1 credit KIN 381A course that was intended to prepare you for this study abroad experience. Satisfactory-fail only.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

KIN 466X. Exercise for Mental Health . (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: KIN 366, or senior status in Psychology, or Instructor permission. Understand the state-of-the-knowledge of the mental health benefits of physical activity both in the prevention and in the treatment of clinical mental health and other psychological conditions. Focus on both the neurobiological bases of mental health disorders and the effects of exercise on these factors. Practical approach to encouraging changes in physical activity across populations suffering from psychological disturbances as part of treatment.

KIN 474X. Music and Neuroscience. (Cross-listed with MUSIC 474X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: KIN 372 or permission by instructor. Understanding how music is processed in the brain and the implications for healthy care and education. Online discussions about how music changes all aspects of the brain from neurotransmitters to cortical reorganization.

KIN 491X. Undergraduate Teaching Experience. (2-0) Cr. 1-2. Repeatable. Prereq: Junior/Senior status and permission of coordinator. Undergraduate teaching assistant opportunity in Kinesiology. Satisfactory-Fail only.

KIN 553X. Molecular Physiology and Metabolism. (Cross-listed with NUTRS 553X). (2-0) Cr. 1. Prereq: Biochemistry, physiology, or permission of instructor . Focuses on the biochemical, cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate whole body, cell and tissue-specific fuel metabolism. An integration of mechanisms regulating metabolic signaling responses to alterations in nutritional status (e.g., starvation, obesity) or stressors such as exercise, nutrient stress, aging and disease. The contribution of metabolic derangements to disease pathogenesis (e.g., diabetes, obesity, CVD) will be discussed along with potential therapeutics. Critically read primary research papers, and gain familiarity with seminal papers in the field and state-of-the-art research techniques in nutrition, exercise, physiology and metabolism.

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LAS 203X. Professional Career Preparation. (1-0) Cr. 1. F.S.SS. Overview of practical skills such as writing resumes and cover letters, implementing an internship or job search, interviewing, evaluating offers, professional etiquette, and networking. Exploration of resources and online professional tools.  Only one of LAS 203X, MATH 202X/STAT 202X, or BUSAD 203 may count toward graduation. Satisfactory-fail only.

LING 169X. A Linguistic Approach to Taboo Language . (Cross-listed with ENGL 169X). (3-0) Cr. 3. SS. An introduction to linguistics through the study of taboo language. Topics such as etymology of taboo words, psychological effects of swearing, cross-cultural taboos, and censorship. Students sensitive to explicit language or those with only a non-scholarly interest in taboo language are discouraged from enrolling .

LING 321X. Creating Novel Solutions for Language Learning. (Cross-listed with ENGL 321X). (1-0) Cr. 1. Analysis of markets and unmet needs for language learning tools. Development of entrepreneurial knowledge and disposition through innovative project proposals for prospective investors, users, or other participants.

LING 517X. Corpus Linguistics. (Cross-listed with  ENGL 517X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: ENGL 511 or LING 511 or an introductory course in Linguistics. Corpus linguistics methods of language analysis, including corpus design, construction and annotation; data in corpus studies; tools and methods of analysis. Corpus methods applied in vocabulary, grammar, register and dialect variation, language change, pragmatics, semantics, stylistics, language learning and teaching, and language testing.

LING 563X. Contemporary Spanish Linguistics. (Dual-listed wiht LING 463/SPAN 463; cross-listed with SPAN 563X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: SPAN 352. Study of various topics related to the Spanish language. Topics may include bilingualism, historical linguistics and dialectology, Spanish in the U.S., language assessment, computer-assisted language learning and instruction, and second language acquisition. Taught in Spanish.

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M E 491X. Laboratory Component. Cr. 1-3. This course is designed specifically for transfer and study abroad students who need to make up a lab to fulfill course requirements.

M E 502X. Microfluidics and Nanofluidics: Theory, Design and Devices. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: M E 436 (Heat Transfer) or an undergraduate class on transport phenomena, or Instructor’s permission. Analysis of fluid motion in the field of microfluidics, i.e., the dynamics of fluid flow at the sub-millimeter scale under the influence of relevant physical forces. Contemporary microfluidics is relevant to the scientific study of flows in small geometries, to the design of tools for biology, medicine and energy technologies. Constitutive relations for the stress tensor in a fluid; Conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy. Capillary and multiphase flow at small scales. Wettability and related surface engineering methods. Interfacial transport phenomena involving thermal, chemical or electrical gradients. Analytical and numerical methods to design microfluidic devices such as pumps, valves, heat exchangers, actuators, dispensers and mixers. Analysis of applications of multiphase microfluidics in engineering and biological structures.

M E 534X. Energetic Materials Combustion and Systems. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S, offered 2020. Prereqs: M E 231; MATH 267; M E 335 or AER E 310. Recommend: M E 436; AER E 311; M E 437 or M E 542. Introduction to energetic materials (classes of energetics, their use, safety, analysis of multiphase deflagration/detonation reaction wave structures), and their application (e.g. chemical propulsion systems).

M E 570X. Solid Modeling and GPU Computing. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: M E 170 and M E 419, or Instructor Permission. Theory and applications of solid modeling and introduction to parallel computing using the graphic processing unit (GPU). Topics include solid modeling fundamentals, different representations of solid geometry, introduction to parallel programming using CUDA, and applications of GPU algorithms. Design and analysis software include SolidWorks and programming using C and NVIDIA CUDA.

M E 591X. Probabilistic Engineering Analysis and Design. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: Linear algebra or MATH 207; probability theory or STAT 231; or instructor permission. Applications of probabilistic and statistical methods to engineering system design and post-design failure prognostics. Hands-on learning of various probabilistic and statistical design methods, such as design of experiments, surrogate modeling, uncertainty quantification, reliability-based design, and robust design. It also covers Bayesian estimation and machine learning methods for post-design failure prognostics.

M E 592X. Data Analytics and Machine Learning for Cyber-Physical Systems Applications.  (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: Basics of linear algebra, probability theory and computer programming. Introduction to data analytics and machine learning driven solutions to cyber-physical systems problems such as design and verification, anomaly detection, fault diagnostics, event classification, prediction and mitigation. The course involves hands-on learning of various data science techniques for various problem solving steps such as data preprocessing/variable selection, feature extraction, modeling, inference and visualization tasks with a special focus on advanced tools such as deep learning and probabilistic graphical models. Applications include diverse cyber-physical systems - smart buildings and grid, transportation, manufacturing, agriculture and energy systems. Take-home assignments and final project.

M E 693X.  Entrepreneurship for Graduate Students in Science and Engineering . (Cross-listed with AGRON 693X, BCB 693X, E E 693X, ENGR 693X, and GENET 693X). (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.  Prereq: Graduate student status and completion of at least one semester of graduate coursework. Understanding key topics of starting a technology based company, from development of technology-led idea to early-stage entrepreneurial business. Concepts discussed include: entrepreneurship basics, starting a business, funding your business, protecting your technology/business IP. Subject matter experts and successful, technology-based entrepreneurs will provide real world examples from their experience with entrepreneurship. Learn about the world class entrepreneurship ecosystem at ISU and Central Iowa.

MAT E 170X. Numeric, Symbolic, and Graphical Methods for Materials Engineering. (2-2) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: ENGR 160. Introduction to computer-based problem solving techniques including data analysis, data visualization, and materials simulation using spreadsheet, array, and symbolic methods that are necessary for materials science. Introduction to 3D CAD with consideration for additive manufacturing techniques.

MAT E 452X. Scanning and Auger Electron Microscopy. (Dual-listed with M S E 552). (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs:  PHYS 222. Open to MAT E majors only . Characterization of materials using scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron microprobe, and auger spectrometer. Compositional determination using energy and wavelength dispersive x-ray and Auger spectroscopies. Specimen preparation. Laboratory covers SEM operation.

MAT E 499X. Undergraduate Research Opportunity . Cr. R. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Prereq: Permission of Instructor.  Independent study working in research lab with faculty member. Designed to allow students opportunity to gain experience that may assist them in obtaining future employment. Satisfactory-fail only.

MATH 241X. Financial Methematics Problems. (1-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Credit or concurrent enrollment in Math 240 . Preparation for the Society of Actuaries exam FM .

MATH 403X. Intermediate Abstract Algebra. (Dual-listed with MATH 503X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: C or better in MATH 301 or permission of department. Not open to students with credit in MATH 504 or MATH 505. Properties of groups and rings, subgroups, ideals, and quotients, homomorphisms, structure theory for finite groups. PIDs, UFDs, and Euclidean Domains. Field extensions and finite fields. Selected applications.

MATH 422X. Mathematical Principles of Data Science. (Dual-listed with MATH 522X; Cross-listed with DS 422X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MATH 414. Mathematical foundations of algorithms in data science. Topics include Riemann-Stieltjes integration, Riesz-Markov theorem, Stone-Weierstrass theorem, Universal Approximation theorem, reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces, Cauchy and Fourier kernels, convergence of clustering algorithms, and topological persistence.

MATH 423X. Mathematical Modeling in Biology . (Dual-listed with MATH 523X). (Cross-listed with BCBIO 423X and BCB 523X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MATH 266 or equivalent; MATH 265 or equivalent recommended. Introduction to mathematical techniques for modeling and simulation, parameter identification, and analysis of biological systems. Applications drawn from many branches of biology and medicine. Apply differential equations, difference equations, and dynamical systems theory to a wide array of biological problems.

MATH 469X. Introduction to Discrete Mathematics . (Dual-listed with MATH 569X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: MATH 317 or MATH 207; and MATH 304 or MATH 314 . Combinatorial counting, double-counting, generating functions, graph structure, planar graphs, probabilistic proofs, points in general positions, polytopes, Farkas lemma, linear programming and duality.

MATH 503X. Intermediate Abstract Algebra. (Dual-listed with MATH 403X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: C or better in MATH 301 or permission of department. Not open to students with credit in MATH 504 or MATH 505. Properties of groups and rings, subgroups, ideals, and quotients, homomorphisms, structure theory for finite groups. PIDs, UFDs, and Euclidean Domains. Field extensions and finite fields. Selected applications.

MATH 518X. Mathematical Modeling and Differential Equations. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: Math 414, MATH 415. Basic theory of ordinary differential equations, existence and uniqueness theorems, linear systems, linearization and stability, mathematical models in biology and physics, modeling with ordinary and partial differential equations, dynamical systems techniques.

MATH 522X. Mathematical Principles of Data Science. (Dual-listed with MATH 422X; Cross-listed with DS 422X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MATH 414. Mathematical foundations of algorithms in data science. Topics include Riemann-Stieltjes integration, Riesz-Markov theorem, Stone-Weierstrass theorem, Universal Approximation theorem, reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces, Cauchy and Fourier kernels, convergence of clustering algorithms, and topological persistence.

MATH 523X. Mathematical Modeling in Biology . (Dual-listed with MATH 423X). (Cross-listed with BCBIO 423X and BCB 523X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MATH 266 or equivalent; MATH 265 or equivalent recommended. Introduction to mathematical techniques for modeling and simulation, parameter identification, and analysis of biological systems. Applications drawn from many branches of biology and medicine. Apply differential equations, difference equations, and dynamical systems theory to a wide array of biological problems.

MATH 569X. Introduction to Discrete Mathematics . (Dual-listed with MATH 469X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: MATH 317 or MATH 207; and MATH 304 or MATH 314 . Combinatorial counting, double-counting, generating functions, graph structure, planar graphs, probabilistic proofs, points in general positions, polytopes, Farkas lemma, linear programming and duality.

MATH 581X. Numerical Methods for Differential Equations. (Dual-listed with MATH 481, COM S 481). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: MATH 265; and either MATH 266 or MATH 267; knowledge of a programming language is helpful. Introduces basic numerical methods for solving differential equations. Topics include: First order Euler method, high order Runge-Kutta methods, and multistep methods for solving ordinary differential equations. Finite difference and finite element methods for solving partial differential equations. Local truncation error, stability, and convergence for finite difference method. Numerical solution space, polynomial approximation, and error estimate for finite element method. Computer programming required.

MATH 603X. Mathematical Logic II. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: MATH 601. Topics in model theory, computability theory, and set theory such as infinitary logic, non-standard models of arithmetic, ultraproducts, and independence results.

MATH 619X. Commutative Algebra. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: MATH 505. Detailed study of commutative rings with applications to number theory and algebraic geometry, including prime ideals, Going Up and Going Down theorems, exact sequences, modules of fractions, primary decomposition, rings of integers, dimension theory.

MATH 620X. Lie Algebras and Their Representations. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: MATH 504; and MATH 507 or MATH 510. Nilpotent and solvable Lie algebras. Root systems and the classification of finite-dimensional complex semi-simple Lie algebras. The universal enveloping algebra. Representation theory including Weyl's theorem, Verma modules, highest weight theory.

MGMT 422X. Negotiation and Conflict Resolution. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MGMT 371. Understand the theory and practice of negotiation in a variety of settings. Negotiation is the art and science of securing an agreement between two or more interdependent parties. Understand the behavior of individuals, groups and organizations in the context of competitive situations. Team work and team building is integrated to better understand interdependent relationships and processes. Negotiation problems faced by managers and professionals in organizations. Complements the technical and diagnostic skills learned in other courses at ISU. Analytical skills needed to discover optimal solutions to problems and a broad array of negotiation skills are needed in order for these solutions to be accepted and implemented.

MGMT 473X. Advanced Human Resource Management I. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: MGMT 371. Introduction to and hands-on experience with measurement and analysis techniques applicable to business professionals. Use of data science to analyze short- and long-term consequences of specific human resource practices on the organization and on society as a whole. Designed for all managers with the responsibilities of planning, recruiting, selecting, training, and developing talent in an organization as well as compensating, retaining, and managing the performance and careers of a diverse and talented workforce. A human capital-centric approach to emphasize how an organization’s design and talent management has direct consequences on its adaptability and success.

MGMT 476X. Talent Management. (Dual-listed with MGMT 576X). (3-0) 3 Cr. SS. T alent management, similar to human resources and/or human capital management, with a more strategic and integrated flavor. Emphasis on what practicing managers need to know about managing talent. Topics include the importance of strategic and evidence-based approaches to managing and making decisions about human capital (talent); recruiting and retaining talent; selecting talent, including evaluating specific selection methods with regard to their reliability, validity for predicting both performance and potential, fairness et cetera; legal and diversity issues in managing talent; managing talent in groups and teams; evaluating or assessing talent (both performance and potential); managing the performance of, and providing feedback to, talent; developing talent and identifying and developing potential; and managing talent derailment risk. Scientific, systematic, and evidence-based perspective with appreciation for the practical demands.

MGMT 481X. Nonprofit Management . (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Junior classification or above. Executives in nonprofits are recognizing the need to incorporate contemporary management skills into their organization and connect their organizations to related business. Executives in for-profit businesses interact with the nonprofit sector in business operations or in service as a board member for a nonprofit organization. Management practices that can be applied across lines in both nonprofit organization and for-profit businesses. Focus on the strategy, governance, management and leadership of nonprofit organizations and explore how this sector fits into the business landscape.

MGMT 523X. Leadership. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Enrollment in the MBA program or permission of instructor. Applied overview of organizational leadership and teamwork, with special emphasis on the ability to successfully influence in a variety of contexts. Areas of emphasis include: research to better understand the influence process; leadership, followership, and management as a process; change and how to better lead and manage change in organizations.

MGMT 576X. Talent Management. (Dual-listed with MGMT 476X). (3-0) 3 Cr. SS. T alent management, similar to human resources and/or human capital management, with a more strategic and integrated flavor. Emphasis on what practicing managers need to know about managing talent. Topics include the importance of strategic and evidence-based approaches to managing and making decisions about human capital (talent); recruiting and retaining talent; selecting talent, including evaluating specific selection methods with regard to their reliability, validity for predicting both performance and potential, fairness et cetera; legal and diversity issues in managing talent; managing talent in groups and teams; evaluating or assessing talent (both performance and potential); managing the performance of, and providing feedback to, talent; developing talent and identifying and developing potential; and managing talent derailment risk. Scientific, systematic, and evidence-based perspective with appreciation for the practical demands.

MGMT 606X. Historical Foundations of Entrepreneurship Research. (Cross-listed with ENTSP 606X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Enrollment in the PhD Program. Seminal readings, theoretical perspectives, and historical roots of Entrepreneurship research. A broad variety of core foundational theories, perspectives, and approaches are discussed.

MGMT 608X. Human Resources Management Theory & Research. Cr. 3. S. Advanced research seminar in human resources management. The scope and coverage of the seminar is designed to representatively reflect the important content areas in the field, and the major theoretical and empirical contributions in each area. The seminar will be decidedly research focused with discussions concentrating on critical reviews and evaluations of existing work, and the identification of potential directions for theory development and future research. Through reading assignments, weekly papers, and the development of a theoretical paper, students should gain an appreciation for the current status of theory and research, and begin to articulate major issues and challenges facing the field of human resources management.

MGMT 609X. Organizational Research Methods . (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Enrollment in ENTSP or MGMT PhD program or permission of instructor. Solid methodological foundation that will prepare you to be a productive producer and educated consumer of scientific research in the field of Management, Entrepreneurship, and other related disciplines. Introduction to numerous concepts and techniques with relevance to your future scholarship in this domain. Conceptual underpinnings necessary to appreciate the strengths and limitations of various approaches used in these fields and the interplay between theoretical advancement and rigorous empirical investigation.

MGMT 610X. Research Capabilities in Management. (2-0) Cr. 2. F.S. Prereq: Enrollment in ENTSP or MGMT PhD program or permission of instructor. Skills and training necessary to navigate the professional landscape of the management/entrepreneurship fields. Topics include research collaborations and networking, the peer review process, ethics, presenting scholarly work, developing a research identity, creating interesting research questions and setting the hook, understanding the research process, receiving and utilizing feedback, and navigating career milestones. Blends theory, research, and practice as we consider our roles as scholars in the field, the implications of our work, and successful advancement through career stages.

MICRO 115X. Phage Discovery Lab. (1-3) Cr. 2. F. An exploratory laboratory where students will purify phage from soil, visualize phage using electron microscopy and isolate genomic material for nucleic acid sequencing.

MICRO 116X. Phage Genome Annotation Lab. (1-3) Cr. 2. S. Prereq: Recommended: MICRO 115X. An experiential microbiology laboratory where students learn to annotate and submit a complete phage genome . 

MICRO 265X. Predicting the Next Epidemic: Living in a One Health World . (2-2) Cr. 2. F.S. Prereq: High School Biology or Environmental Science . 8 week course. “One Health” concept as a relatively new approach to disease control, sustainability, and the consequences of environmental disruption. Interconnectedness of human, animal, and environmental health. Importance of scientists communicating with the general public about One Health topics, such as habitat loss, agricultural practices, and the spread of antibiotic resistant organisms.

MICRO 360X. Global Health. (Cross-listed with V MPM 360X and GLOBE 360X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Biol 211. Global Health explores health and its determinants across the world with a commitment to the many disciplines and variables that influence health. The course will stress the interconnectedness of humans, animals, and the environment, with emphasis on poor countries. The course is designed to challenge the typical understanding of what impacts health and to stimulate the student to take an entrepreneurial approach to finding solutions. Current events will be a major focus of the class. Within the context of health and disease, topics will include poverty, infectious diseases, gender, social media, climate change, animal health, agriculture, and more. Each student will complete one case study on a topic related to global health. Outside reading and films will be required for each class meeting. There will be four exams. Students will also be expected to sign up for Twitter and use Black Board.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

MIS 367X. Consultative Problem Solving. (Cross-listed with MKT 367X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Sophomore and above. Consultative problem-solving approach to address complex problems in marketing and related fields. Topics include problem definition, issue tree dis-aggregation, hypotheses development and the Pyramid Principle. Development of skills such as formulating problems, structuring and prioritizing problems, synthesizing results and communicating intuition from quantitative analyses.

MIS 491X. Consulting and Enterprise Resource Planning: Your German Adventure. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: MIS 301. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems implementation, maintenance, and upgrade activities, processes, and challenges. Examine relationships between corporate ERP adopters and users, software vendors, and consultants in an international context.

MIS 541X. Analytics in Finance and Insurance. (Cross-listed with FIN 541X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Introduction to Business Analytics (BA) in finance and the insurance industry. The concepts and tools discussed in this course, to be followed and complemented by more advanced courses in the area. Basic analytical thinking and business acumen focusing on applications from finance and insurance. Practical data analytic skills based on building real analytic applications on real data.

MIS 545X. Enterprise Cybersecurity Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.  This course focuses on the challenges, technologies, and practices of information security management in enterprise operations.

MIS 547X. Teams, Communication, and Project Management. Cr. 3. SS. Intensive preparation in teamwork and project management skills for business analytics students that will be applied in their professional lives.

MIS 548X. Applications of Machine Learning for Business Intelligence. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Introduction to applications for data science concepts in the business domain. As big data, machine learning, business analytics, business intelligence and other concepts grow in business applications, it is essential for students to understand the underlying concepts, data, models, and applications to be successful in a data-driven world. Students will learn how to determine problem types, data restrictions, model selection, tool choice, and analysis of data science concepts for greater business value.

MIS 551X. IT Strategy & Execution. (2-1) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Graduate standing. Explore the building blocks of IT strategy in alignment with the business strategy. Emphasis on business aspects. Evaluate the impact of technologies on IT strategy. Explore IT strategy framework, understand the latest trends and exercise critical thinking with relevant case studies and discussion. Small groups will analyze a fictitious company as assigned and develop a future state IT vision and IT strategy that supports the business goals. Guest lecturers .

MIS 557X. Information Systems Capstone Project. (1-0) Cr. R. F.S. Prereq: Classification in MS program in Information Systems. Synthesize information systems concepts, skills, and practices learned during the program of study to complete a research project. Student teams will complete the capstone research project under the supervision of an advisory team of Information Systems faculty. At the completion of the course, teams will present their project findings marking the completion of the program of study. Satisfactory-fail only.

MIS 610X. Seminar on Deception Detection, Media & Neuroscience. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S. Deceptive communication and its detection. Role of communication media, national culture, and deception in non-dyadic settings. Neuroscience tools, such as eye tracking and EEG techniques, now provide additional avenues for the study of deception and its detection. Designed to acquaint graduate students from multiple disciplines with deceptive communication, current areas of research opportunity, and novel techniques for its study. Access available to the College of Business’s Neurolab to develop projects.

MIS 620X. Overview of MIS Research. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Introduce doctoral students to the most cited research in IS, as well as to various behavioral research methods. Readings on research topics will cover categories of IS knowledge including: IS development, IT & individuals, IT & groups, IT & organizations, and IT & markets.
 

MIS 635X. Computational Research in MIS. (3-0) Cr. 3. Introduction for doctoral students to Information Systems research methods rooted in computational thinking. Topics include: important issues in IS research that benefit from computational thinking; and computational methodologies commonly used in IS research.

MKT 342X. Foundation of Personal Selling. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Sophomore and above. The process of selling and how to sell effectively. Focus on selling in a business environment and applying to concepts to general interpersonal settings in personal life. Students will actively participate in class, collaborate with teammates to develop skills to sell ideas and become more effective in representing themselves and their company and its products and services. Develop skills necessary to build long-term, profitable relationships with clients.

MKT 362X. Digital Marketing. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: MKT 340. A survey course that explores key topics and competencies that will help formulate a digital marketing strategy and power a digital marketing campaign. Digital marketing is a broader toolkit that includes search engine marketing (SEM), search engine optimization (SEO), content marketing, mobile marketing, email marketing, landing page optimization, social media marketing, and more

MKT 367X. Consultative Problem Solving. (Cross-listed with MIS 367X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Sophomore and above. Consultative problem-solving approach to address complex problems in marketing and related fields. Topics include problem definition, issue tree dis-aggregation, hypotheses development and the Pyramid Principle. Development of skills such as formulating problems, structuring and prioritizing problems, synthesizing results and communicating intuition from quantitative analyses.

MKT 495X. Case Competitions in Sales and Marketing. Cr. 3. Repeatable. F.S. Prereq: MKT 340. Practical and complex sales and marketing problems using knowledge and skills learned from previous classes. Hands-on experiences to enhance skills in critical thinking, quantitative analysis and communications through the combination of lectures, in-class exercises and various case competitions.

MKT 605X. Marketing Analytics: Quantitative Models and Applications. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. F.  Survey of quantitative methods used in the field of marketing analytics. Topics include discrete choice models, unobserved heterogeneity, endogeneity, Hidden Markov models and other newly-developed techniques. Understand, develop and estimate quantitative models and understand main topics in marketing analytics.

MTEOR 140L. Climate and Society Laboratory. (Cross-listed with AGRON 140L/ENV S 140L/GEOL 140L). (0-2) Cr. 1. F.S. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in MTEOR/AGRON/ENV S/GEOL 140X or Instructor Permission . Analyze and interpret weather and climate data. Relationship between climate and society based on data and case studies from the real world. The climate system in the past and present based on climate data. The role of climate in shaping society and distribution of resources. Natural and human driven climate change. Carbon and water footprints. Global and regional scale impacts of climate change in the 21st century. Feasible solutions to adapting to and mitigating climate change.

MTEOR 140X. Climate and Society. (Cross-listed with AGRON 140X/ENV S 140X/GEOL 140X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. The climate system of our planet. How nature and our actions alter the existing energy balance leading to climate change. Past climates on our planet. The influence of climate on society and resource availability during the Holocene (~ 11,000 years ago to present) with focus on changes post industrial revolution. Significant climate events that have altered our way of life in the past. Projected changes in future climate and potential impacts on society, environment and resources. Adaption to and mitigation of climate change.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

MTEOR 440X. Tropical Meteorology. (Dual-listed with MTEOR 540X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F (offered in 2019). Prereq: Credit or enrollment in MTEOR 341. Weather and climate of the tropical atmosphere. Weekly forecast discussions related to the development of tropical cyclones and teleconnection patterns between the tropics and higher latitudes. Topics covered include easterly waves, tropical cyclogenesis (i.e., hurricanes, typhoons, cyclones), equatorial waves, El Niño-Southern oscillation, Madden-Julian oscillation, and monsoons.

MTEOR 540X. Tropical Meteorology. (Dual-listed with MTEOR 440X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F (offered in 2019). Prereq: Credit or enrollment in MTEOR 341. Weather and climate of the tropical atmosphere. Weekly forecast discussions related to the development of tropical cyclones and teleconnection patterns between the tropics and higher latitudes. Topics covered include easterly waves, tropical cyclogenesis (i.e., hurricanes, typhoons, cyclones), equatorial waves, El Niño-Southern oscillation, Madden-Julian oscillation, and monsoons.

MTEOR 535X. Radar Applications in Meteorology. (Dual-listed with MTEOR 435). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Fundamentals of radar meteorology with an emphasis on applications. Topics presented include theory of radar, engineering principles, Doppler radar, polarimetric radar, and applications to remote sensing of clouds and precipitation.

MUSIC 474X. Music and Neuroscience. (Cross-listed with KIN 474X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: KIN 372 or permission by instructor. Understanding how music is processed in the brain and the implications for healthy care and education. Online discussions about how music changes all aspects of the brain from neurotransmitters to cortical reorganization.

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NEURO 589X. Systems Neuroscience: Brain, Behavior, and Nutrition-Related Integrative Physiology. (Cross-listed with NUTRS 589X, FS HN 589X, GERON 589X, PSYCH 589X). (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereqs: Graduate standing, or undergraduate with consent of instructor. Structural, functional, and biochemical aspects of brain and non-motor behavior across the human lifespan. Types of neuroimaging used to assess the brain. Current research is leveraged to gauge how nutrition, diseases related to nutrition, and associated physiological processes influence the brain, particularly for common developmental, psychological, and neurological disorders.

NREM 115X. Explorations in Natural Resource Ecology & Management. (1-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Animal Ecology and Forestry majors, Freshman classification. Inte ract with faculty in the Department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management through lectures, discussions, and field experiences.

NREM 311X. Field Ecology in Montana. (2-6) Cr. 4. SS. Prereqs: BIOL 211, 211L, 212, 212L or equivalent and permission of instructors. Fundamental concepts and principles of ecology dealing with organisms, populations, communities, and ecosystems. Taught at NREM's Rod and Connie French Conservation Education Camp in western Montana. Emphasizes hands-on learning of principles and methods in the field.

NREM 455X. Stream Restoration. (Dual-listed with NREM 555X). (2-0) Cr. 2. F. Prereq: CE 372 or GEOL 402 or NREM 407 or A ECL 418 or ABE 431 or equivalent. Interdisciplinary introduction to the science and practice of stream restoration, with emphasis on restoring physical and biological integrity and ecosystem services to streams and riparian corridors. Lecture highlights philosophical, scientific, and engineering principles.

NREM 455L. Stream Restoration Lab. (Dual-listed with NREM 555LX).  (0-3) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: CE 372 or GEOL 402 or NREM 407 or A ECL 418 or ABE 431 or equivalent. Introduction to measurement and analysis of stream form and function for restoration and rehabilitation. Includes field data collection, map and image analysis, and computation for assessment of channel stability, biotic integrity, and recovery potential.

NREM 555X. Stream Restoration. (Dual-listed with NREM 455X). (2-0) Cr. 2. F. Prereq: CE 372 or GEOL 402 or NREM 407 or A ECL 418 or ABE 431 or equivalent. Interdisciplinary introduction to the science and practice of stream restoration, with emphasis on restoring physical and biological integrity and ecosystem services to streams and riparian corridors. Lecture highlights philosophical, scientific, and engineering principles.

NREM 555LX. Stream Restoration Lab. (Dual-listed with NREM 455LX).  (0-3) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: CE 372 or GEOL 402 or NREM 407 or A ECL 418 or ABE 431 or equivalent. Introduction to measurement and analysis of stream form and function for restoration and rehabilitation. Includes field data collection, map and image analysis, and computation for assessment of channel stability, biotic integrity, and recovery potential.

NUTRS 553X. Molecular Physiology and Metabolism. (Cross-listed with KIN 553X). (2-0) Cr. 1. Prereq: Biochemistry, physiology, or permission of instructor . Focuses on the biochemical, cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate whole body, cell and tissue-specific fuel metabolism. An integration of mechanisms regulating metabolic signaling responses to alterations in nutritional status (e.g., starvation, obesity) or stressors such as exercise, nutrient stress, aging and disease. The contribution of metabolic derangements to disease pathogenesis (e.g., diabetes, obesity, CVD) will be discussed along with potential therapeutics. Critically read primary research papers, and gain familiarity with seminal papers in the field and state-of-the-art research techniques in nutrition, exercise, physiology and metabolism.

NUTRS 589X. Systems Neuroscience: Brain, Behavior, and Nutrition-Related Integrative Physiology. (Cross-listed with FS HN 589X, GERON 589X, NEURO 589X, PSYCH 589X). (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereqs: Graduate standing, or undergraduate with consent of instructor. Structural, functional, and biochemical aspects of brain and non-motor behavior across the human lifespan. Types of neuroimaging used to assess the brain. Current research is leveraged to gauge how nutrition, diseases related to nutrition, and associated physiological processes influence the brain, particularly for common developmental, psychological, and neurological disorders.

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