Experimental Courses 2020-2021, G-O

G H I J K L M N O

G

GEN 351X. Principles of Domestic Animal Genetics . (Cross-listed with AN S 351X) (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: BIOL 211, BIOL 212, and STAT 101 or 104 . Foundation of genetics, genomics, and statistical concepts in domestic animal populations.

GENET 693X.  Entrepreneurship for Graduate Students in Science and Engineering . (Cross-listed with AGRON 693X, BCB 693X, E E 693X, ENGR 693X, and M E 693X). (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.  Prereq: Graduate student status and completion of at least one semester of graduate coursework. Understanding key topics of starting a technology based company, from development of technology-led idea to early-stage entrepreneurial business. Concepts discussed include: entrepreneurship basics, starting a business, funding your business, protecting your technology/business IP. Subject matter experts and successful, technology-based entrepreneurs will provide real world examples from their experience with entrepreneurship. Learn about the world class entrepreneurship ecosystem at ISU and Central Iowa. Satisfactory-fail only.

GEOL 140X. Climate and Society. (Cross-listed with AGRON 140X/ENV S 140X/MTEOR 140X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. The climate system of our planet. How nature and our actions alter the existing energy balance leading to climate change. Past climates on our planet. The influence of climate on society and resource availability during the Holocene (~ 11,000 years ago to present) with focus on changes post industrial revolution. Significant climate events that have altered our way of life in the past. Projected changes in future climate and potential impacts on society, environment and resources. Adaption to and mitigation of climate change.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

GEOL 559X. Quantitative Methods in Geology. (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered 2020. Prereqs:  MATH 166, PHYS 112, GEOL 356, or by permission of instructor. A nalysis of geologic data on applied and quantitative basis using MATLAB. Introduction to basic programming with special focus to applied geoscience problems such as stress and strain analysis, particle tracking for fracture propagation and strain field visualization, basic tectonic modeling, red noise filtering. Toolkit development for effective handling of large data sets and picture analysis.

GERON 589X. Systems Neuroscience: Brain, Behavior, and Nutrition-Related Integrative Physiology. (Cross-listed with FS HN 589X, NEURO 589X, NUTRS 589X, PSYCH 589X). (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereqs: Graduate standing, or undergraduate with consent of instructor. Structural, functional, and biochemical aspects of brain and non-motor behavior across the human lifespan. Types of neuroimaging used to assess the brain. Current research is leveraged to gauge how nutrition, diseases related to nutrition, and associated physiological processes influence the brain, particularly for common developmental, psychological, and neurological disorders.

GLOBE 330X. Global Health Disparities. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Junior classification. Historical and contemporary factors contributing to disparities in health outcomes for persons disadvantaged by income, location, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and abilities. Analysis and evaluation of health promotional materials, such as campaigns, and community-based interventions focused on reducing global health disparities .
Meets U. S. Diversity Requirement.

GLOBE 360X. Global Health. (Cross-listed with MICRO 360X and V MPM 360X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Biol 211. Global Health explores health and its determinants across the world with a commitment to the many disciplines and variables that influence health. The course will stress the interconnectedness of humans, animals, and the environment, with emphasis on poor countries. The course is designed to challenge the typical understanding of what impacts health and to stimulate the student to take an entrepreneurial approach to finding solutions. Current events will be a major focus of the class. Within the context of health and disease, topics will include poverty, infectious diseases, gender, social media, climate change, animal health, agriculture, and more. Each student will complete one case study on a topic related to global health. Outside reading and films will be required for each class meeting. There will be four exams. Students will also be expected to sign up for Twitter and use Black Board.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

GR ST 536X. Preparing Publishable Thesis Chapters. (Cross-listed with ENGL 536X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Reporting original research results within the norms for writing of a student's discipline. Emphasis on preparing thesis/dissertation chapters that will be both acceptable to the Graduate College and ready for submission to a refereed journal in the student's discipline. Focus on reporting results from student-generated original research, norms for discourse within disciplines, and how thesis chapters differ from journal manuscripts.

H

H SCI 203X. Professional Career Preparation. Cr. 1. F.S.SS. Prereq:  Must have completed orientation course and be sophomore classification or higher . Career preparation topics such as: effective resume writing, interviewing, comprehensive job and internship search strategies, negotiating offers, etc. Develop effective strategies for overall professionalism within the job and internship process to allow for a positive impact on career success.

H S 167X. The Science of Health Behavior Change. (3-0) Cr. 3. SS. A theory- and evidence-based approach to the understanding of health behavior change. Practical approaches to promote introspection, increase self-awareness, motivation, confidence, and alignment between lifestyle and personal values.

HCI 523X. Qualitative Research Methods in HCI . (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Introduction to qualitative research methods specific to human computer interaction and user experience research, both from an academic perspective and applied industry perspective. Conduct, write, and critique qualitative research. Examples and projects will be drawn from human computer interaction domains, e.g., mobile apps, web applications, automated vehicle, self-checkout stations, etc. Methods include focus groups, interviews, surveys, and many others.

HCI 530X. Perspectives in HCI. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. An exploration of different perspectives in HCI that covers: inclusive and humane design; the intersection of technology and race, gender, age, and class; technology around the world; the impact of technology on democracy; social engineering and cybersecurity; and other relevant topics students would like to explore.

HCI 560X. Learn to Speak AI. (3-0) Cr. 3. SS.  Prereq: Programming skills are useful but not essential. Concepts from the design and analysis of algorithms in Artificial Intelligence. Recap mathematical knowledge and apply to learning how several popular learning algorithms work. Illustrate technical issues addressed by specialists in the field.

HCI 584X. Python Application Development in HCI. (3-0). Cr. 3. SS. Prereqs: Working knowledge of Python equivalent to HCI 574. Must be enrolled in the HCI graduate program. Completion or concurrent enrollment in the HCI Design requirement. Implement Python code and write design documents (“specs”) and complement their code with sufficiently detailed documentation in development of a large Python project of the student's choosing. Typical development process: idea, specification, prototyping and implementation (including debugging, testing, refactoring) and documentation and result in a demo-able final product. Fulfills the implementation requirement of the HCI program.

HD FS 384X. Family Insurance Planning. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. St rategies for managing family financial risk with insurance. Emphasis on communication and planning process and the use of risk mitigation and insurance within families. Risk analysis and management within the comprehensive family financial planning process.

HD FS 387X. Applying Evidence Based Practices in Human Services. (3-0) Cr. 3. F S. Prereq: HD FS 224, 226, 227, 234, or Psych 230. Exploration of evidence-based practices in human services. Exposure to and practice of the skills required to work with individuals and families in engagement, needs assessment, development of human services interventions, and data-based progress monitoring evaluation phases of human services. Practical strategies such as motivational interviewing and behavioral techniques will be covered.

HG ED 538X. Foundations of Engineering Education. (Cross-listed with ENGR 538X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Engineering graduate students or instructor permission required. Introduction to the field of engineering education, with an emphasis on engineering education history, existing challenges, teaching and learning pedagogies and theories, research opportunities, and research methodologies. The course goal is to develop students as scholars and to have students think critically about engineering and education. Students will apply the knowledge gained from this course to propose a research project related to their own discipline. The proposal is intended to help students learn and apply the key elements of engineering education research. This course is intended for students with a variety of interests and career goals, including those interested in learning to conduct engineering education research, exploring research discoveries about teaching and learning, and engaging with the engineering education community.

HG ED 552X. Introduction to Higher Education in the United States . (3-0) Cr. 3. Overview of higher education in the United States, including a brief history, the functions, organization, external influences, funding, and the major issues impacting postsecondary institutions today.

HG ED 673X. Diversity and Inclusion in Higher Education. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.  Critical understanding of issues of diversity and inclusion in higher education. There are multiple dimensions to diversity and inclusion, far too complicated to cover in one course. Therefore, the goal of this seminar is to provide a general understanding of theory, research, and practices related to diversity and inclusion issues. Considers intersectional perspectives of diversity and inclusion within higher education.

HG ED 667X. Leadership & Change in Community Colleges. (3-0) Cr. 3. SS. Prereq: Admission to Ed.D. emphasis in Community College Leadership. An examination of advanced community college leadership practice. Team-based leadership, leadership strategies, planning, and change.

HIST 364X. The Mythic Wild West . (3-0) Cr. 3. SS. Examination of the history of the mythic American West, including how people have thought about the region, the myths that emerged from the West, and the role the mythical West played in the formation of American identity.

HIST 598X. Methods of Teaching History/Social Sciences. (Dual-listed with HIST 498; Cross-listed with EDUC 498). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereqs: Concurrent enrollment in EDUC/HIST 480A or EDUC 591; Admitted to Educator Preparation Program and 3 credits in subject-matter field. Theories and processes of teaching and learning secondary history/social sciences. Emphasis on development and enactment of current methods, assessments, and curriculum materials for providing appropriate learning experiences.

HSP M 248X. Introduction to Senior Living Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. Survey course provides a comprehensive overview of the history, current issues, and future trends of the senior living industry. Basics about major aspects of senior living management.

HSP M 301X. Hospitality Revenue Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. An overview of the revenue management in the lodging and food service industry will be provided. Emphasis will be placed on the application of analytical and forecasting techniques to formulate and implement pricing strategies in responses to daily operation complexities.

HSP M 385X. Beer and Brewed Beverages in the Hospitality Industry. (2-0) Cr. 1. F.S. Prereq: HSP M 383 or concurrent enrollment. Must be at least 21 years old. Introduction to history and methods of production for a variety of beer, cider, perry, mead, sake and other brewed alcoholic beverages. Beverage tasting and sensory analysis; product knowledge; and service techniques related to the beverage and hospitality industry. Field trip. 8 week course.

HSP M 393CX. HSP M Workshop: Innovations in Chocolate I. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S. Introduction to the usage of chocolate in the food industry. Properties of chocolate and how to utilize to create chocolate-based recipes and mold chocolate shapes. Learning activities to apply theoretical concepts and gain experience in chocolate melting, tempering, and mixing techniques. Lectures are online.

HORT 132X. Wedding and Event Floral Design . (1-2) Cr. 2. F.S. Prereq: HORT 131. Principles of design and proper mechanics for ceremony flowers, reception flowers, personal flowers, bridal bouquets, and event florals. Flower and plant materials that are commonly used in the event industry. Plan, design, cost, order, and create florals for a wedding, then present as the final project for implementation.

HORT 233X. House Plants and Interiorscaping. (1-2) Cr. 2. F.S. Basic introduction to indoor houseplants and interiorscapes. Understand plant selection, identification, maintenance, and problem solving. Learn current houseplant trends, commercial interior plant design, and installation. A beneficial course for students with an interest in house plants, retail plant sales, Interiorscaping, event design, or gardening.

HORT 581X. Experience in Plant Science Extension and Outreach. (Cross-listed with AGRON 581X, ENT 581X, and PL P 581X). Cr. 1. A supervised learning experience in several extension delivery methods used in the plant sciences. Participation in Iowa State University-based extension programs that may include field crop, horticulture, or Master Gardener programming.

I

I E 420X. Engineering Problem Solving with R. (Dual-listed with I E 520X). Cr. 3. S. Prereq: An introductory statistics course: Stat 231 or equivalent. Statistical analysis and engineering problem solving using R programming language. Data manipulation. Exploratory data analysis. Statistical quality assurance. Basic statistical analysis. R Markdown. Simulation. Conditional expressions, loops, and functions. Matrices. High level data visualizations. Data extraction from text. Optimization. Logistic regression. High performance computing tools. Project required for graduate credits.

I E 422X. Design and Analysis Applications for System Improvement. (1-6) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: Credit in I E 222, I E 271, I E 305, I E 361, and credit or enrollment in I E 413; OR permission of instructor. A team-based design project that is large and open-ended drawing from previous IE courses. Application of engineering design including process improvement methods to produce solutions while considering realistic constraints . Can be used as capstone design experience or as engineering topic elective.

I E 434X. Entrepreneurial Product Engineering Design Project . (Cross-listed with ENGR 434X). (1-4) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: I E 430 or ENGR 430 . Open-ended design project related to creating, validating and launching a new engineered product into the marketplace. Fundamentals related to launching new engineered products in an Entrepreneurial way. Students submit new product ideas or select from a list of company supplied ideas. Application of engineering design principles including product definition, competitive evaluation, requirements evaluation, product design, manufacturing design, manufacturing costing, prototype creation, field validation, user evaluation.

I E 437X. Reliability and Safety Engineering. (Dual-listed with I E 537). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: STAT 231 or STAT 305 or STAT 587 . Mathematical basics for dealing with reliability data, theory, and analysis. Bayesian reliability analysis. Engineering ethics in safety evaluations. Case studies of accidents in large technological systems. Fault and event tree analysis.

I E 463X. Introduction to Engineering and Systems Management. (3-0). Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: STAT 231 or STAT 305 or equivalent; upperclassman standing and permission of instructor. Engineering and systems management topics for the undergraduate student including challenges and expectations of a junior engineering manager. Probability applications to project management, issues associated in working with and supporting various personnel, basic financial calculations, earned value management, and tools that are useful for the engineering manager. Case studies involving leadership and ethics, and a group project required.

I E 511X. Data Modelling for Industrial Engineering . (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: I E 361 or Stat 231, and knowledge of linear algebra. Overview of parametric versus nonparametric methods, inference; introduction to rank-based tests and/or nonparametric smoothing methods for estimating density and regression functions; smoothing parameter selection; applications to semiparametric models and goodness-of-fit tests of a parametric model; application of feature selection methods, multivariate data exploration. Oral and written reports.

I E 520X. Engineering Problem Solving with R. (Dual-listed with I E 420X). Cr. 3. S. Prereq: An introductory statistics course: Stat 231 or equivalent. Statistical analysis and engineering problem solving using R programming language. Data manipulation. Exploratory data analysis. Statistical quality assurance. Basic statistical analysis. R Markdown. Simulation. Conditional expressions, loops, and functions. Matrices. High level data visualizations. Data extraction from text. Optimization. Logistic regression. High performance computing tools. Project required for graduate credits.

I E 544X. Micro/Nano Scale Additive Printing. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: I E 348 or equivalent manufacturing engineering course. Introduction of physical theory, design, analysis, fabrication, and characterization of micro/nano scale fabrication and manufacturing systems; introduction of micro/nano scale additive manufacturing; and deep understanding of additive printing for micro/nano scale applications. Focus on the fabrication/manufacturing of important types of microstructures used in micro/nano devices using additive printing, and the techniques and tools used to characterize them. Students are expected to finish a team projected related applying additive printing experimentally or theoretically to the design of a sensor.

I E 580X. Introduction of Project Management for Thesis Research. (Cross-listed with M S E 580X and CH E 580X). (1-0) Cr. 1. F.S. Tools and skills of Project Management (PM) adapted from industry to improve efficiency in thesis research. Project charter initiation for thesis, timeline and meeting scheduling tools, expectation management, and communication with advisors. Practice of the PM skills using student’s own thesis. Presentation of a project charter. Demonstration of knowledge of related PM skills and the ability of utilizing these skills for thesis research. Sharing thesis ideas and learning experience in the Graduate for Advancing Professional Skills (GAPS) learning community. Satisfactory-fail grading only.

I E 592X. Advanced Analytics Projects . (1-2) Cr. 3. Prereq: Graduate standing in Industrial Engineering or permission of instructor . Practical experience in data analytics and decision modeling, along with communication and teamwork, through the development and completion of an industry project. Application of descriptive and prescriptive analytics methods to formulate and solve a complex engineering analytics problem. Development of decision support skills including problem definition, model building, data visualization, and extraction of managerial insights.

I E 645X. Laser-based Advanced Manufacturing. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: I E 545 or I E 549 or an equivalent graduate-level manufacturing engineering course. Concepts and fundamentals of laser-matter interaction. Design, optimization and analysis of laser shock processing and laser heating-based manufacturing. Advanced manufacturing simulations. Literature review, data analysis, and academic writing/presentation of laser-based advanced manufacturing research.

I E 672X. Human Factors in Automation Design. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Graduate classification. Concepts in human-automation systems, including levels of automation, types of automation, and level of control. Implications of how adaptive automation affects error, trust, workload, situation awareness, and performance. Understand how human operators are affected by automation implementation in real-world systems. Apply human factors concepts to the design and assessments of human-automation systems.

I E 677X. Human Augmentation Engineering. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Alt. F., offered in 2020. Prereqs: I E 577 or I E 571 or by permission of instructor. Utilization of engineering controls, training techniques, and administrative controls to augment human capabilities to improve worker performance and resiliency. Explore how engineering techniques can be utilized to enhance human physical and cognitive capabilities. Investigate the effect of the environment on humans and how to adapt workers to extreme environments.

IND D 220X. Concept Sketching. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S. Introduction to fundamentals of sketching for industrial designer. Key aspects of concept sketching: 1) fundamentals of form development, 2) fundamentals of rendering, and 3) fundamentals of user interactions. Hands-on sketching course for industrial designers.

IND D 240X. Digital Tools for Industrial Design. (3-0). Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Admitted to Industrial Design Program and by permission of the instructor. Introduction of digital applications and workflows through the lens specific to industrial design tasks requisite to the industrial design curriculum and professionally. Emphasizes these tools, towards such tasks, through initial demonstrations of workflows, exercises/project-based practice, and feedback. Includes but not limited to: 1) An overview of the Adobe applications and their integration, 2) Digital tablet-based software, and 3) Online vector and image resources. Provides foundational skills for each subsequent years’ course deliverables.

IND D 402X. Industrial Design Studio VI: Designing for Social Impact. (12-0) Cr. 6 F.S.1. Prereq: IND D 301. Advanced topics focused on industrial design applications in service-learning and community engagement projects. Topics vary each time offered. Meets Industrial Design Experiential Learning Requirements

IND D 435X. Strategic Design and Project Managemen t. (3-0). Cr. 3. S. Prereq: IND D 201, IND D 202, IND D 301, and IND D 302 or permission of instructor .  Review and development of executable strategies for entrepreneurial, commercial and business efforts. Focus on strategic thinking, economics of innovation, tactical approaches and effective measures in order to integrate a full cycle of product/service development. Advanced technical design processes, design management, decision-making and value proposition.

IND D 560X. Change by Design: Disruptive Innovation . (3-0). Cr. 3. F. Exploration and execution of applied projects on civic entrepreneurship, social innovation and design activism. Through the 3 lenses of strategic, systems and critical thinking, it addresses the importance of design for social impact when applied to cases of service-learning, community-engagement, design ethics and transitional design. Change theory and management are central to examine diffusions and disruptions of innovation.

IND D 570X. Systems Thinking in Design . (3-0). Cr. 3. F. Emphasis on 21st Century Design Issues through systems thinking as language, problem-framing as pivoting process and transitional design as frame innovation model. Exploration of interconnected and dynamic 21st century global issues, where complexity and future industries play a key role. Issues such as societal transitions, loss of biodiversity and climate change, circular economy, eco-centric design, aging, equity, mobility, robotics, cybernetics, etc. are discussed and mapped out for industrial design applications.

IND D 580X. Material Culture and Values . (3-0). Cr. 3. S. The meanings of objects from the perspectives of design, material culture, philosophy and cultural studies. Critically examine the role of objects in everyday life. Concepts include: value of things, semiotics, object fetishism, product semantics, consumer value and production labor. Case studies of historic and contemporary objects will be discussed to understand key theoretical concepts and to make meaningful connection between theory and everyday objects.

INTST 250X. The World’s Regions in a Global Context . (3-0). Cr. 3. F.S. Comparative study of the world's regions beyond North America (Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, and the Middle East) within the context of globalization and regionalization. Framework for understanding how environmental, demographic, political and socio-cultural relationships in each region are affected by geographic connections. Exploration of how these relationships will shape future regional geographies.
International Perspectives.

J

JL MC 140X. Identity, Diversity and the Media. (3-0) Cr. 3.  Understand perspectives and biases within journalism, advertising and public relations content, including content shared through social-media platforms. Analyze content generated by others. Topics include media literacy, source evaluation, portrayals of diverse groups, identification of diverse sources and strategies for reducing bias in media work.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

JL MC 504X. Advanced Communication Research Methods: Qualitative. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: JL MC 502 or equivalent research methods course. In-depth examination of qualitative methods in journalism and mass communication research. Social scientific and humanistic modes of inquiry. Discussions of critical-cultural theory, design and presentation of qualitative studies, and application of qualitative research methods in communication.

K

KIN 294AX. Practicum in Adult Fitness Assessment: Techniques and Interpretation . Cr. 1-6. F.S. Prereq: KIN 258. Introduction to principles and techniques involved in conducting and interpreting physical fitness assessments in adults. Students interested in gaining practical experience in health coaching should enroll in the associated practicum course (KIN 294B). Satisfactory-Fail.

KIN 294BX. Practicum in Adult Fitness Assessment: Supervised Experience . Cr. 1-2. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Prereq: KIN 258; KIN 294A (or concurrent enrollment) . Conduct and interpret physical fitness assessments with adults. Protocols for assessing aerobic, muscular fitness, and flexibility, and will have opportunities to practice and refine these skills in supervised adult fitness settings. Satisfactory-Fail.

KIN 466X. Exercise for Mental Health . (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: KIN 366, or senior status in Psychology, or Instructor permission. Understand the state-of-the-knowledge of the mental health benefits of physical activity both in the prevention and in the treatment of clinical mental health and other psychological conditions. Focus on boththe neurobiological bases of mental health disorders and the effects ofexercise on these factors. Practical approach to encouraging changes inphysical activity across populations suffering from psychological disturbances as part of treatment.

KIN 491X. Undergraduate Teaching Experience. Cr. 1-2. F.S.SS. Prereq: Junior/Senior status and permission of instructor. Undergraduate teaching assistant opportunity in Kinesiology.

KIN 553X. Molecular Physiology and Metabolism. (Cross-listed with NUTRS 553X). (2-0) Cr. 1. Prereq: Biochemistry, physiology, or permission of instructor . Focuses on the biochemical, cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate whole body, cell and tissue-specific fuel metabolism. An integration of mechanisms regulating metabolic signaling responses to alterations in nutritional status (e.g., starvation, obesity) or stressors such as exercise, nutrient stress, aging and disease. The contribution of metabolic derangements to disease pathogenesis (e.g., diabetes, obesity, CVD) will be discussed along with potential therapeutics. Critically read primary research papers, and gain familiarity with seminal papers in the field and state-of-the-art research techniques in nutrition, exercise, physiology and metabolism.

L

LAS 345X. Innovation and Entrepreneurship I. (1-0) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: Permission of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Introduction to the entrepreneurial mindset and key concepts related to innovation and entrepreneurship. Application of principles through case studies, group work and direct mentoring. Opportunities for experiential learning with LAS mentors, entrepreneurs, and alumni.

LAS 346X. Innovation and Entrepreneurship II. (1-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Permission of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. E xploration of key concepts related to innovation and entrepreneurship. Application of principles through case studies, group work and direct mentoring. Opportunities for experiential learning with LAS mentors, entrepreneurs, and alumni.

LD ST 301X. Leadership Theories. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Critical examination of historical and contemporary leadership theory. Create a personal leadership philosophy. Apply leadership theory to practice.

LING 169X. A Linguistic Approach to Taboo Language . (Cross-listed with ENGL 169X). (3-0) Cr. 3. SS. An introduction to linguistics through the study of taboo language. Topics such as etymology of taboo words, psychological effects of swearing, cross-cultural taboos, and censorship. Students sensitive to explicit language or those with only a non-scholarly interest in taboo language are discouraged from enrolling .

LING 321X. Creating Novel Solutions for Language Learning. (Cross-listed with ENGL 321X). (3-0) Cr. 1. S. Analysis of markets and unmet needs for language learning tools. Development of entrepreneurial knowledge and disposition through innovative project proposals for prospective investors, users, or other participants.

LING 480DX. Speech and Hearing Science . (Cross-listed with CMDIS 480DX). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: CMDIS 275 or CMDIS 371 . Basic acoustics, auditory acoustics, speech acoustics, and theories and models of speech perception and speech production.

M

M E 318X. Solar Powered Racing Vehicles - Design, Construction and Racing. (Cross-listed with CPR E 318X, E E 318X, MAT E 318X).  (3-0) Cr. 3. Irr. F. Repeatable. Prereq: Permission of instructor and department. Project-based course centered on the design, construction and racing of a solar powered vehicle; focus will be around hands on design and manufacturing of solar car with support from leading companies and collaborators, accompanied by a series of focus-based classes, workshops and networking events optimized to enhance the student's learning experience and employability.

M E 426X. Mechanical Vibration . (Dual-listed with 526X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MATH 266 or 267; E M 324; M E 345. Elementary vibration analysis; single and multiple degree of freedom systems, energy methods; response to common transient, harmonic and random excitation sources; numerical methods of solution; eigenvalues and modal analysis; introduction to testing methods, data sampling and signal processing; vibration isolation, absorption and coupling minimization.

M E 491X. Laboratory Component. Cr. 1-3. This course is designed specifically for transfer and study abroad students who need to make up a lab to fulfill course requirements.

M E 526X. Mechanical Vibration. (Dual-listed with 426X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MATH 266 or 267; E M 324; M E 345. Elementary vibration analysis; single and multiple degree of freedom systems, energy methods; response to common transient, harmonic and random excitation sources; numerical methods of solution; eigenvalues and modal analysis;introduction to testing methods, data sampling and signal processing;vibration isolation, absorption and coupling minimization.

M E 548X. Fundamentals of Laser and Optical Measurements in Thermofluid Systems. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S, offered 2021. Prereqs: Undergraduate thermodynamics, undergraduate fluid dynamics, multivariable calculus, differential equations, electricity and magnetism. Fundamentals of lasers and optical techniques for application in measurements of thermo-fluid systems. Rigorous diffraction theory, theory of laser operation, and applications of theory to measurements using optics and lasers will be covered. The principles of measurement using linear scattering techniques (absorption, Rayleigh and Raman scattering) as well as nonlinear techniques (CARS and multiphoton absorption) will be discussed.

M E 570X. Solid Modeling and GPU Computing. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: M E 170 and M E 419, or Instructor Permission. Theory and applications of solid modeling and introduction to parallel computing using the graphic processing unit (GPU). Topics include solid modeling fundamentals, different representations of solid geometry, introduction to parallel programming using CUDA, and applications of GPU algorithms. Design and analysis software include SolidWorks and programming using C and NVIDIA CUDA.

M E 592X. Data Analytics and Machine Learning for Cyber-Physical Systems Applications.  (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: Basics of linear algebra, probability theory and computer programming. Introduction to data analytics and machine learning driven solutions to cyber-physical systems problems such as design and verification, anomaly detection, fault diagnostics, event classification, prediction and mitigation. The course involves hands-on learning of various data science techniques for various problem solving steps such as data preprocessing/variable selection, feature extraction, modeling, inference and visualization tasks with a special focus on advanced tools such as deep learning and probabilistic graphical models. Applications include diverse cyber-physical systems - smart buildings and grid, transportation, manufacturing, agriculture and energy systems. Take-home assignments and final project.

M E 693X.  Entrepreneurship for Graduate Students in Science and Engineering . (Cross-listed with AGRON 693X, BCB 693X, E E 693X, ENGR 693X, GENET 693X). (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.  Prereq: Graduate student status and completion of at least one semester of graduate coursework. Understanding key topics of starting a technology based company, from development of technology-led idea to early-stage entrepreneurial business. Concepts discussed include: entrepreneurship basics, starting a business, funding your business, protecting your technology/business IP. Subject matter experts and successful, technology-based entrepreneurs will provide real world examples from their experience with entrepreneurship. Learn about the world class entrepreneurship ecosystem at ISU and Central Iowa. Satisfactory-fail only.

M S E 575X. Alloy Solidification Phenomena, Mechanisms, and Microstructures . (Dual-listed with MAT E 475X). (1-0). Cr. 1. Prereq: MAT E 341 or I E 348 or graduate standing . Phenomenology of alloy solidification, its influence on multi-scale structure, and implications with respect to design and control of melt-based processes. Basic freezing behavior of pure metals and alloys, chemical partitioning and diffusional growth, nucleation, interface instability and morphological dynamics, chemical segregation, dendritic and eutectic growth, solidification defects, and the influence of process parameters. Emphasis on measurable microstructural features arising from solidification phenomena and their dependence on processing conditions. Examples related to engineering alloys and advanced solidification processes.

M S E 580X. Introduction of Project Management for Thesis Research. (Cross-listed with CH E 580X and I E 580X). (1-0) Cr. 1. F.S. Tools and skills of Project Management (PM) adapted from industry to improve efficiency in thesis research. Project charter initiation for thesis, timeline and meeting scheduling tools, expectation management, and communication with advisors. Practice of the PM skills using student’s own thesis. Presentation of a project charter. Demonstration of knowledge of related PM skills and the ability of utilizing these skills for thesis research. Sharing thesis ideas and learning experience in the Graduate for Advancing Professional Skills (GAPS) learning community. Satisfactory-fail grading only.

M S E 582X. Data Analytics and Machine Learning in Materials Research . (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Basics of data mining and machine learning as applied to materials data from both experiment and computational modeling. Focus on determining the correlation of structures and properties in a wide range of materials systems, with an emphasis on mesoscale structures (e.g., microstructures). Understanding of and proficiency in these tools to apply them in their research. Applications oriented, with those applications taken from real-world materials data.

MAT E 170X. Numeric, Symbolic, and Graphical Methods for Materials Engineering. (2-2) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: ENGR 160. Introduction to computer-based problem solving techniques including data analysis, data visualization, and materials simulation using spreadsheet, array, and symbolic methods that are necessary for materials science. Introduction to 3D CAD with consideration for additive manufacturing techniques.

MAT E 318X. Solar Powered Racing Vehicles - Design, Construction and Racing. (Cross-listed with ME 318X, CPR E 318X, E E 318X).  (3-0) Cr. 3. Irr. F. Repeatable. Prereq: Permission of instructor and department. Project-based course centered on the design, construction and racing of a solar powered vehicle; focus will be around hands on design and manufacturing of solar car with support from leading companies and collaborators, accompanied by a series of focus-based classes, workshops and networking events optimized to enhance the student's learning experience and employability.

MAT E 475X. Alloy Solidification Phenomena, Mechanisms, and Microstructures . (Dual-listed with M S E 575X). (1-0) Cr. 1. Prereq: MAT E 341 or I E 348. Phenomenology of alloy solidification, its influence on multi-scale structure, and implications with respect to design and control of melt-based processes. Basic freezing behavior of pure metals and alloys, chemical partitioning and diffusional growth, nucleation, interface instability and morphological dynamics, chemical segregation, dendritic and eutectic growth, solidification defects, and the influence of process parameters. Emphasis on measurable microstructural features arising from solidification phenomena and their dependence on processing conditions. Examples related to engineering alloys and advanced solidification processes.

MAT E 499X. Undergraduate Research Opportunity . Cr. R. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Prereq: Permission of Instructor.  Independent study working in research lab with faculty member. Designed to allow students opportunity to gain experience that may assist them in obtaining future employment. Satisfactory-fail only.

MATH 403X. Intermediate Abstract Algebra. (Dual-listed with MATH 503X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: C or better in MATH 301 or permission of department. Not open to students with credit in MATH 504 or MATH 505. Properties of groups and rings, subgroups, ideals, and quotients, homomorphisms, structure theory for finite groups. PIDs, UFDs, and Euclidean Domains. Field extensions and finite fields. Selected applications.

MATH 423X. Mathematical Modeling in Biology . (Dual-listed with MATH 523X and cross-listed with BCBIO 423X and BCB 523X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MATH 266 or equivalent; MATH 265 or equivalent recommended. Introduction to mathematical techniques for modeling and simulation, parameter identification, and analysis of biological systems. Applications drawn from many branches of biology and medicine. Apply differential equations, difference equations, and dynamical systems theory to a wide array of biological problems.

MATH 469X. Introduction to Discrete Mathematics . (Dual-listed with MATH 569X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: MATH 317 or MATH 207; and MATH 304 or MATH 314 . Combinatorial counting, double-counting, generating functions, graph structure, planar graphs, probabilistic proofs, points in general positions, polytopes, Farkas lemma, linear programming and duality.

MATH 503X. Intermediate Abstract Algebra. (Dual-listed with MATH 403X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: C or better in MATH 301 or permission of department. Not open to students with credit in MATH 504 or MATH 505. Properties of groups and rings, subgroups, ideals, and quotients, homomorphisms, structure theory for finite groups. PIDs, UFDs, and Euclidean Domains. Field extensions and finite fields. Selected applications.

MATH 506X. Algebraic Topology . (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Math 301 and Math 414 . Topological spaces, singular homology and cohomology, homotopy. Topics selected from cup products, simplicial and CW complexes, fundamental groups, homotopy theory, Poincare duality, homological algebra.

MATH 518X. Mathematical Modeling and Differential Equations. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: Math 414, MATH 415. Basic theory of ordinary differential equations, existence and uniqueness theorems, linear systems, linearization and stability, mathematical models in biology and physics, modeling with ordinary and partial differential equations, dynamical systems techniques.

MATH 523X. Mathematical Modeling in Biology . (Dual-listed with MATH 423X and cross-listed with BCBIO 423X and BCB 523X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MATH 266 or equivalent; MATH 265 or equivalent recommended. Introduction to mathematical techniques for modeling and simulation, parameter identification, and analysis of biological systems. Applications drawn from many branches of biology and medicine. Apply differential equations, difference equations, and dynamical systems theory to a wide array of biological problems.

MATH 569X. Introduction to Discrete Mathematics . (Dual-listed with MATH 469X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: MATH 317 or MATH 207; and MATH 304 or MATH 314 . Combinatorial counting, double-counting, generating functions, graph structure, planar graphs, probabilistic proofs, points in general positions, polytopes, Farkas lemma, linear programming and duality.

MATH 623X. High-Dimensional Probability and Linear Algebra for Machine Learning. (Cross-listed with E E 623X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MATH 510 or MATH 507; E E 523 or STAT 542. Key topics from non-asymptotic random matrix theory: Bounds on minimum and maximum singular values of many classes of high-dimensional random matrices, and on sums of a large number of random matrices.Chaining. Other linear algebra and probability concepts commonly used in Theoretical Machine Learning research. Discussion of recent papers in this area.

MGMT 381X. Managing Family Businesses. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Sophomore classification. Introduction to the important role family businesses play in the domestic and global economies and to the complex challenges and opportunities family businesses and the family members and other people involved encounter. Explore and identify best practices for successfully managing family businesses.

MGMT 422X. Negotiation and Conflict Resolution . (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MGMT 371. Understand the theory and practice of negotiation in a variety of settings. Negotiation is the art and science of securing an agreement between two or more interdependent parties. Understand the behavior of individuals, groups and organizations in the context of competitive situations. Team work and team building is integrated to better understand interdependent relationships and processes. Negotiation problems faced by managers and professionals in organizations. Complements the technical and diagnostic skills learned in other courses at ISU. Analytical skills needed to discover optimal solutions to problems and a broad array of negotiation skills are needed in order for these solutions to be accepted and implemented.

MGMT 473X. Advanced Human Resource Management I . (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MGMT 371. Introduction to and hands-on experience with measurement and analysis techniques applicable to business professionals. Use of data science to analyze short- and long-term consequences of specific human resource practices on the organization and on society as a whole. Designed for all managers with the responsibilities of planning, recruiting, selecting, training, and developing talent in an organization as well as compensating, retaining, and managing the performance and careers of a diverse and talented workforce. A human capital-centric approach to emphasize how an organization’s design and talent management has direct consequences on its adaptability and success.

MGMT 474X. Employee Compensation and Benefits . (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: MGMT 471. Basic strategies, structures, and decisions involving employee compensation and benefit programs, including how these can be used to optimize financial, relational, and societal returns. Prepare management and human resource professionals on this important topic and also to give other future employees a comprehensive look at this key part of the employer/employee exchange dynamic. Provide understanding for individuals to competently manage and negotiate their own compensation lifecycle - from hire, to promotion, job change, and retirement.

MGMT 475X. Employment Law for Human Resources. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereqs: ACCT 215; MGMT 471. Fundamentals of U.S. employment law necessary for human resource management. Topics include sources of employment law, classification of workers, lawful hiring practices, liability arising from harassment and discrimination, worker’s rights and duties, employment contract issues, and lawful termination of an employee.

MGMT 476X. Talent Management. (Dual-listed with MGMT 576X). (3-0) Cr. 3. SS. T alent management, similar to human resources and/or human capital management, with a more strategic and integrated flavor. Emphasis on what practicing managers need to know about managing talent. Topics include the importance of strategic and evidence-based approaches to managing and making decisions about human capital (talent); recruiting and retaining talent; selecting talent, including evaluating specific selection methods with regard to their reliability, validity for predicting both performance and potential, fairness et cetera; legal and diversity issues in managing talent; managing talent in groups and teams; evaluating or assessing talent (both performance and potential); managing the performance of, and providing feedback to, talent; developing talent and identifying and developing potential; and managing talent derailment risk. Scientific, systematic, and evidence-based perspective with appreciation for the practical demands.

MGMT 520X. Corporate Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Technology Management. (Cross-listed with ENTSP 520X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: Graduate classification. Management of venture creation and innovation at large and established organizations. New ideas, concepts, and techniques on how to stimulate and exploit innovative activities to make established firms not only more responsive and flexible, but also more proactive and opportunity-creating. Related approaches combine activities targeted at the individual, team, organization, industry, regional, national and global level. Introduction to how today's large and established corporations (1) identify, develop and exploit innovative opportunities, (2) manage product development processes, and (3) create, spin-in, spin-off and manage new innovative ventures. This case-based course introduces emerging, non-traditional, evidence-based approaches, such as agile product development, design-thinking, entrepreneurial leadership, entrepreneurial ecosystems, open innovation and blue-ocean strategies.

MGMT 560X. Leadership Development . (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Applies overview of organizational leadership leveraging a 360 leadership evaluation, with special emphasis on the ability to be successful in a variety of contexts. The 360 leadership evaluation will form the foundation to create a leadership action plan. This will great assist in increasing one’s leadership effectiveness as the students' strengths and weaknesses discovered.

MGMT 576X. Talent Management. (Dual-listed with MGMT 476X). (3-0) Cr. 3.SS. Talent management, similar to human resources and/or human capital management, with a more strategic and integrated flavor. Emphasis on what practicing managers need to know about managing talent. Topics include the importance of strategic and evidence-based approaches to managing and making decisions about human capital (talent); recruiting and retaining talent; selecting talent, including evaluating specific selection methods with regard to their reliability, validity for predicting both performance and potential, fairness et cetera; legal anddiversity issues in managing talent; managing talent in groups and teams; evaluating or assessing talent (both performance and potential); managing the performance of, and providing feedback to, talent; developing talent and identifying and developing potential; and managingtalent derailment risk. Scientific, systematic, and evidence-based perspective with appreciation for the practical demands.
 

MGMT 609X. Organizational Research Methods . (Cross-listed with ENTSP 609X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Enrollment in ENTSP or MGMT PhD program or permission of instructor. Solid methodological foundation that will prepare you to be a productive producer and educated consumer of scientific research in the field of Management, Entrepreneurship, and other related disciplines. Introduction to numerous concepts and techniques with relevance to your future scholarship in this domain. Conceptual underpinnings necessary to appreciate the strengths and limitations of various approaches used in these fields and the interplay between theoretical advancement and rigorous empirical investigation.

MGMT 612X. Seminar in Micro Management Topics. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F. (Offered in 2020). Foundation in micro research including domains of organizational behavior (OB) and human resource management (HR). Discuss classic micro topics (e.g., job performance), as well as topics that exemplify recent advances within the OB/HR literatures (e.g., big data). Multiple levels of analysis and consider how micro topics complement other areas of management research (i.e., entrepreneurship and macro topics). Theory and empirical research within the applied context of the OB/HR environment. Emphasize a systematic and scientific approach to deepening collective knowledge and understanding of topics.

MGMT 620AX. Special Topics: Resources and Capabilities . (3-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Graduate student enrolled in a PhD program. Provide students with a deeper content knowledge of foundational and contemporary research on organizational resources and capabilities. Concepts (e.g., resources, capabilities, sustainable competitive advantage, knowledge, etc.), theoretical frameworks (e.g., Resource-based Theory; Dynamic Capabilities; Resource-dependency Theory; Knowledge-based view), and relevant findings in this area of research. Multiple levels of analysis and consideration of how these topics emerge across different areas of management (micro and macro) and entrepreneurship research. Theory and empirical research embedded within the applied context of the management field. Emphasis on a systematic and scientific approach to deepening our knowledge and understanding of topics.

MGMT 620BX. Special Topics: Leadership. (3-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Graduate student enrolled in a PhD program. Provide a deeper content knowledge of leadership. Review major behavioral styles of leadership, as well as leader-follower relationships and a variety of other current leadership issues. Multiple levels of analysis and consideration of how these topics emerge across different areas of management (micro and macro) and entrepreneurship research. Theory and empirical research embedded within the applied context of the management field. Emphasis on a systematic and scientific approach to deepening knowledge and understanding of topics.

MGMT 620CX. Special Topics: Groups and Teams. (3-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Graduate student enrolled in a PhD program. Provide content knowledge of research in teams within the field of management, broadly defined. Covers research on teams from the perspective of the input-mediator-output-input model, which considers teams as complex, dynamic, and adaptive systems. Discussion of questions concerning composition and structure, processes and emergent states, and multilevel as well as temporal dynamics. Consideration of teams in students’ specific area of study (e.g., entrepreneurial teams, top management teams). Blend of theory and empirical research within the applied context of the management field. Emphasis on a systematic and scientific approach to deepening knowledge and understanding of topics.

MGMT 620DX. Special Topics: Crafting Research Ideas. (Cross-listed with ENTSP 620DX). (3-0) Cr. 1. S.Prereq: Graduate student enrolled in a PhD program. Role as a scholar is more than publishing research. The purpose of scholarship is to add to usable knowledge – which means knowledge that can be used to solve real-world problems. To publish an article, students need to convince other scholars of the quality of their research. To create usable knowledge, you need to solve a problem that managers face and communicate that solution to managers. Most managers do not read academic journals, so the publication of an article does not guarantee that anyone who needs the knowledge will find it. Introduction an ideal form of scholarship that Andy Van de Ven calls “engaged scholarship.” This form of scholarship requires the rigorous theory and methods but adds the additional component of connecting research to practitioners throughout the research process.

MGMT 620EX. Special Topics: Effective Academic Writing. (Cross-listed with ENTSP 620EX). (3-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Graduate student enrolled in a PhD program. Provide skills and training necessary to navigate the professional landscape of the management and entrepreneurship fields. Discussion of effective academic writing, focusing on the discipline of management (but certainly applicable beyond this field). Blend of theory, research, and practice focused on understanding one's role as a scholar, the implications of scholarly work, and successful advancement through career stages.

MICRO 265X.  Predicting the Next Epidemic: Living in a One Health World . (2-0) Cr. 2. F.S. Prereq: High School Biology or Environmental Science .  8 week course. “One Health” concept as a relatively new approach to disease control, sustainability, and the consequences of environmental disruption. Interconnectedness of human, animal, and environmental health. Importance of scientists communicating with the general public about One Health topics, such as habitat loss, agricultural practices, and the spread of antibiotic resistant organisms.

MICRO 360X. Global Health. (Cross-listed with GLOBE 360X and V MPM 360X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Biol 211. Global Health explores health and its determinants across the world with a commitment to the many disciplines and variables that influence health. The course will stress the interconnectedness of humans, animals, and the environment, with emphasis on poor countries. The course is designed to challenge the typical understanding of what impacts health and to stimulate the student to take an entrepreneurial approach to finding solutions. Current events will be a major focus of the class. Within the context of health and disease, topics will include poverty, infectious diseases, gender, social media, climate change, animal health, agriculture, and more. Each student will complete one case study on a topic related to global health. Outside reading and films will be required for each class meeting. There will be four exams. Students will also be expected to sign up for Twitter and use Black Board.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

MIS 367X. Consultative Problem Solving. (Cross-listed with MKT 367X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Sophomore and above. Consultative problem-solving approach to address complex problems in marketing and related fields. Topics include problem definition, issue tree dis-aggregation, hypotheses development and the Pyramid Principle. Development of skills such as formulating problems, structuring and prioritizing problems, synthesizing results and communicating intuition from quantitative analyses.

MIS 541X. Analytics in Finance. (Cross-listed with FIN 541X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: BUSAD 502 or an advanced undergraduate statistics course recommended . Introduction to Business Analytics (BA) in finance and the insurance industry. The concepts and tools discussed in this course, to be followed and complemented by more advanced courses in the area. Basic analytical thinking and business acumen focusing on applications from finance and insurance. Practical data analytic skills based on building real analytic applications on real data.

MIS 551X. IT Strategy & Execution. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Graduate classification or instructor permission. Explore the building blocks of IT strategy in alignment with the business strategy. Emphasis on business aspects. Evaluate the impact of technologies on IT strategy. Explore IT strategy framework, understand the latest trends and exercise critical thinking with relevant case studies and discussion. Small groups will analyze a fictitious company as assigned and develop a future state IT vision and IT strategy that supports the business goals. Guest lecturers .

MIS 620X. Overview of MIS Research. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F. (offered F19). Introduce doctoral students to the most cited research in IS, as well as to various behavioral research methods. Readings on research topics will cover categories of IS knowledge including: IS development, IT & individuals, IT & groups, IT & organizations, and IT & markets.

MIS 625X. Analytical Research in Information Systems . (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Mathematical models to capture the essence or abstractions of real-world problems and applying established techniques to derive optimal solutions or business insights. Application of theories and tools from operations research, economics, computer science, and statistics to tackle problems regarding the development, marketing, utilization, and management of information technologies and systems in organizations and the society.

MIS 630X. Empirical Research in MIS . (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Intermediate level statistical and econometric methods used in MIS research. Preparation to conduct rigorous longitudinal analyses. Statistical and econometric methods used to examine phenomena that can evolve with the passage of time. Methods used for analyzing cross-sectional data. Application of advanced empirical methods in combination with rigorous theoretical arguments.

MIS 635X. Computational Research in MIS. (3-0) Cr. 3. Introduction for doctoral students to Information Systems research methods rooted in computational thinking. Topics include: important issues in IS research that benefit from computational thinking; and computational methodologies commonly used in IS research.

MKT 362X. Digital Marketing. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: MKT 340. A survey course that explores key topics and competencies that will help formulate a digital marketing strategy and power a digital marketing campaign. Digital marketing is a broader toolkit that includes search engine marketing (SEM), search engine optimization (SEO), content marketing, mobile marketing, email marketing, landing page optimization, social media marketing, and more.

MKT 367X. Consultative Problem Solving. (Cross-listed with MIS 367X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Sophomore and above. Consultative problem-solving approach to address complex problems in marketing and related fields. Topics include problem definition, issue tree dis-aggregation, hypotheses development and the Pyramid Principle. Development of skills such as formulating problems, structuring and prioritizing problems, synthesizing results and communicating intuition from quantitative analyses.

MKT 452X. Sales Analytics. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: MKT 342. An applied study of the concepts, practice, and technical skills required to perform meaningful analytics in support of professional selling. Topics include: nature and aims of sales analytics; customer relationship management platform basics; sales data structure; data visualization; dashboard construction; predictive analytics; artificial intelligence.

MKT 454X. Entrepreneurial Marketing . (Cross-listed with ENTSP 454X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MKT 340. Basic understanding of marketing for those interested in creating or working for a start-up or an innovation-oriented company or consultancy. Relevant to marketing roles in entrepreneurial firms across both B2B and B2C markets. Integrates theory and practice, and provides insight into how entrepreneurs take both strategic and tactical marketing decisions in uncertain business environments. For hands-on perspective, incorporates projects involving real-world marketing problems confronting start-ups, and guest talks from entrepreneurs and frequent case analyses.

MKT 495X. Case Competitions in Sales and Marketing . (3-0) Repeatabe. Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: MKT 340. Practical and complex sales and marketing problems using knowledge and skills learned from previous classes. Hands-on experiences to enhance skills in critical thinking, quantitative analysis and communications through the combination of lectures, in-class exercises and various case competitions.

MKT 548X. Customer Relationship Management Strategy and Analytics. (3-0) Irr. SS. Prereq: MKT 501.  Companies are shifting their focus from products to customers in response to increased globalization and intensity of competition in most markets. New technologies and tools that capture customer data in real time are now available because of the Internet revolution. These two trends in combination have opened up a new way of addressing customers and capturing value from customers--termed "Customer Relationship Management". Focus on the adoption of CRM practices and key strategies that contribute to improved customer and firm performance. Key topics covered include CRM definition and strategy, customer satisfaction and loyalty models, social media and customer engagement, retention and churn models, campaign management and customer value metrics and drivers. Use of customer databases and analytical modeling of important CRM outcomes.

MKT 605X. Marketing Analytics: Quantitative Models and Applications. (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. F.  Survey of quantitative methods used in the field of marketing analytics. Topics include discrete choice models, unobserved heterogeneity, endogeneity, Hidden Markov models and other newly-developed techniques. Understand, develop and estimate quantitative models and understand main topics in marketing analytics.

M S E 475X. Alloy Solidification Phenomena, Mechanisms, and Microstructures . (Dual-listed with MAT E 475X). (1-0) Cr. 1. Prereq: MAT E 341 or I E 348 or graduate standing. Phenomenology of alloy solidification, its influence on multi-scale structure, and implications with respect to design and control of melt-based processes. Basic freezing behavior of pure metals and alloys, chemical partitioning and diffusional growth, nucleation, interface instability and morphological dynamics, chemical segregation, dendritic and eutectic growth, solidification defects, and the influence of process parameters. Emphasis on measurable microstructural features arising from solidification phenomena and their dependence on processing conditions. Examples related to engineering alloys and advanced solidification processes.

MTEOR 140X. Climate and Society. (Cross-listed with AGRON 140X/ENV S 140X/GEOL 140X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. The climate system of our planet. How nature and our actions alter the existing energy balance leading to climate change. Past climates on our planet. The influence of climate on society and resource availability during the Holocene (~ 11,000 years ago to present) with focus on changes post industrial revolution. Significant climate events that have altered our way of life in the past. Projected changes in future climate and potential impacts on society, environment and resources. Adaption to and mitigation of climate change.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

MTEOR 399X. Writing for Research. (1-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: ENGL 250; SP CM 212; MTEOR 311; Junior standing; Majors only. Principles of effective scientific writing and communication. Concepts covered are intended to be applied in MTEOR 499: Senior Research.

MTEOR 490GX. Independent Study: Atmosphere/Ocean Interactions. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. Prereq: 6 credits in meteorology, permission of instructor.

MTEOR 490PX. Special Topics: Atmosphere - Ocean Interaction . Cr. 1-4. Prereq: MTEOR 206. The physical interactions between the atmosphere and ocean, and their influence on weather and climate; coupled modes of climate variability and their teleconnections; air-sea feedbacks in the tropics and mid-latitudes. Applied topics include seasonal prediction; evaluation and analysis of coupled climate model data.

N

NEURO 589X. Systems Neuroscience: Brain, Behavior, and Nutrition-Related Integrative Physiology. (Cross-listed with FS HN 589X, GERON 589X, NUTRS 589X, PSYCH 589X). (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereqs: Graduate standing, or undergraduate with consent of instructor. Structural, functional, and biochemical aspects of brain and non-motor behavior across the human lifespan. Types of neuroimaging used to assess the brain. Current research is leveraged to gauge how nutrition, diseases related to nutrition, and associated physiological processes influence the brain, particularly for common developmental, psychological, and neurological disorders.

NREM 115X. Explorations in Natural Resource Ecology & Management. (1-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Animal Ecology and Forestry majors, Freshman classification. Inte ract with faculty in the Department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management through lectures, discussions, and field experiences.

NREM 455X. Stream Restoration. (Dual-listed with NREM 555X). (2-0) Cr. 2. F. Prereq: CE 372 or GEOL 402 or NREM 407 or A ECL 418 or ABE 431 or equivalent. Interdisciplinary introduction to the science and practice of stream restoration, with emphasis on restoring physical and biological integrity and ecosystem services to streams and riparian corridors. Lecture highlights philosophical, scientific, and engineering principles.

NREM 455L. Stream Restoration Lab. (Dual-listed with NREM 555LX).  (0-3) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: CE 372 or GEOL 402 or NREM 407 or A ECL 418 or ABE 431 or equivalent. Introduction to measurement and analysis of stream form and function for restoration and rehabilitation. Includes field data collection, map and image analysis, and computation for assessment of channel stability, biotic integrity, and recovery potential.

NREM 483X. Science + Design: Interpretation of Natural Resources in Montana. (Dual-listed with NREM 583X and ARTGR 583X; cross-listed with ARTGR 483X). (1-4) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: ARTGR 271 or BIOL 211 and permission of instructor. Interdisciplinary service-learning. Design and production of natural resource related interpretive signs for Montana natural areas. Field-work experience followed by on-campus studio.

NREM 555X. Stream Restoration. (Dual-listed with NREM 455X). (2-0) Cr. 2. F. Prereq: CE 372 or GEOL 402 or NREM 407 or A ECL 418 or ABE 431 or equivalent. Interdisciplinary introduction to the science and practice of stream restoration, with emphasis on restoring physical and biological integrity and ecosystem services to streams and riparian corridors. Lecture highlights philosophical, scientific, and engineering principles.

NREM 555LX. Stream Restoration Lab. (Dual-listed with NREM 455LX).  (0-3) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: CE 372 or GEOL 402 or NREM 407 or A ECL 418 or ABE 431 or equivalent. Introduction to measurement and analysis of stream form and function for restoration and rehabilitation. Includes field data collection, map and image analysis, and computation for assessment of channel stability, biotic integrity, and recovery potential.

NREM 583X. Science + Design: Interpretation of Natural Resources in Montana. (Dual-listed with NREM 483X and ARTGR 483X; cross-listed with ARTGR 583X). (1-4) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Graduate classification and permission of instructor. Interdisciplinary service-learning. Design and production of natural resource related interpretive signs for Montana natural areas. Field-work experience followed by on-campus studio.

NUTRS 553X. Molecular Physiology and Metabolism. (Cross-listed with KIN 553X). (2-0) Cr. 1. Prereq: Biochemistry, physiology, or permission of instructor . Focuses on the biochemical, cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate whole body, cell and tissue-specific fuel metabolism. An integration of mechanisms regulating metabolic signaling responses to alterations in nutritional status (e.g., starvation, obesity) or stressors such as exercise, nutrient stress, aging and disease. The contribution of metabolic derangements to disease pathogenesis (e.g., diabetes, obesity, CVD) will be discussed along with potential therapeutics. Critically read primary research papers, and gain familiarity with seminal papers in the field and state-of-the-art research techniques in nutrition, exercise, physiology and metabolism.

NUTRS 589X. Systems Neuroscience: Brain, Behavior, and Nutrition-Related Integrative Physiology. (Cross-listed with FS HN 589X, GERON 589X, NEURO 589X, PSYCH 589X). (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereqs: Graduate standing, or undergraduate with consent of instructor. Structural, functional, and biochemical aspects of brain and non-motor behavior across the human lifespan. Types of neuroimaging used to assess the brain. Current research is leveraged to gauge how nutrition, diseases related to nutrition, and associated physiological processes influence the brain, particularly for common developmental, psychological, and neurological disorders.

O