Experimental Courses 2020-2021, P-Z

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P R 323X. Strategic Communication in Agriculture and the Environment . (Cross-listed with AGEDS 323X). Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: ENGL 250; junior classification . Effective communication of agricultural and environmental issues. Analysis of attitudes, advocacy, stakeholder engagement, and impacts on individual and societal choices. Application in the domains of public relations, mass media, and popular culture.

P R 324X. Brand Storytelling. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: JL MC 201. Combining critical journalism skills with persuasive tactics of public relations and advertising to tell inspiring brand stories. Introduction to transmedia storytelling that tells compelling stories shared with and by diverse audiences.

PHYS 131X. General Physics I. (4-0) Cr. 4. F.S.SS. Prereqs: 1 1/2 years of high school algebra, 1 year of geometry, 1 semester of trigonometry. General background in physical concepts, principles, and methods for those who do not plan advanced study in physics or engineering. Mechanics, fluids, heat and thermodynamics, vibrations, waves, sound. PHYS 111 will be taught for the last time in Spring 2021; PHYS 131X and PHYS 131LX may be offered beginning Summer 2021.

PHYS 131LX. General Physics I Laboratory. (0-2) Cr. 1. F.S.SS. Prereqs: 1 1/2 years of high school algebra, 1 year of geometry, 1 semester of trigonometry. Credit or enrollment in PHYS 131X. Laboratory experiments in elementary kinematics, work and energy, conservation laws, rotational motion, waves and fluids. PHYS 111 will be taught for the last time in Spring 2021; PHYS 131X and PHYS 131LX may be offered beginning Summer 2021.

PHYS 132X. General Physics II. (4-0) Cr. 4. F.S.SS. Prereqs: PHYS 131X. General background in physical concepts, principles, and methods for those who do not plan advanced study in physics or engineering. Electricity and magnetism, ray and wave optics, topics in modern physics. PHYS 112 will be taught for the last time in Spring 2021; PHYS 132X and PHYS 132LX may be offered beginning Summer 2021.

PHYS 132LX. General Physics II Laboratory. (0-2) Cr. 1. F.S.SS. Prereqs: Credit or enrollment in PHYS 132X. Laboratory experiments in Electricity and Magnetism, Wave and Optics. PHYS 112 will be taught for the last time in Spring 2021; PHYS 132X and PHYS 132LX may be offered beginning Summer 2021.

PHYS 231X. Introduction to Classical Physics I. (4-0). Cr. 4.  F.S.SS. Prereqs: Proficiency in algebra, trigonometry, vector manipulation, and topics covered in MATH 165, and credit or enrollment in MATH 166. For engineering and science majors. 3 hours of lecture each week plus 3 recitations every two weeks. Elementary mechanics including kinematics and dynamics of particles, work and energy, linear and angular momentum, conservation laws, rotational motion, oscillations, gravitation. Heat, thermodynamics, kinetic theory of gases; waves and sound. PHYS 221 will be taught for the last time in Spring 2021; PHYS 231X, PHYS 231HX, and PHYS 231LX may be offered beginning Summer 2021.

PHYS 231HX. Introduction to Classical Physics I: Honors. (4-0). Cr. 4.  F.S.SS. Prereqs: Proficiency in algebra, trigonometry, vector manipulation, and topics covered in MATH 165, and credit or enrollment in MATH 166. For engineering and science majors. 3 hours of lecture each week plus 3 recitations every two weeks. Elementary mechanics including kinematics and dynamics of particles, work and energy, linear and angular momentum, conservation laws, rotational motion, oscillations, gravitation. Heat, thermodynamics, kinetic theory of gases; waves and sound. PHYS 221 will be taught for the last time in Spring 2021; PHYS 231X, PHYS 231HX, and PHYS 231LX may be offered beginning Summer 2021.

PHYS 231LX. Introduction to Classical Physics I Laboratory. (0-2) Cr 1. F.S.SS. Prereqs: Proficiency in algebra, trigonometry, vector manipulation, and topics covered in MATH 165, and credit or enrollment in MATH 166. Credit or enrollment in PHYS 231X. Laboratory experiments in elementary kinematics, work and energy, conservation laws, and rotational motion. PHYS 221 may be taught for the last time in Spring 2021; PHYS 231X and PHYS 231LX will be offered beginning Summer 2021.

PHYS 232HX. Introduction to Classical Physics II: Honors. (4-0) Cr. 4. F.S.SS. Prereqs: PHYS 221 OR PHYS 241, MATH 166. Fluid dynamics. Electric forces and fields. Electrical currents; DC circuits; Magnetic forces and fields; LR, LC, LCR circuits; Maxwell's equations; wave optics. PHYS 222 will be taught for the last time in Spring 2020; PHYS 232X, PHYS 232HX, and PHYS 232LX may be offered beginning Summer 2020.

PHYS 232X. Introduction to Classical Physics II. (4-0) Cr. 4. F.S.SS. Prereqs: PHYS 221 OR PHYS 241, MATH 166. Fluid dynamics. Electric forces and fields. Electrical currents; DC circuits; Magnetic forces and fields; LR, LC, LCR circuits; Maxwell's equations; wave optics. PHYS 222 will be taught for the last time in Spring 2020; PHYS 232X, PHYS 232HX, and PHYS 232LX may be offered beginning Summer 2020.

PHYS 232LX. Introduction to Classical Physics II Laboratory. (0-2) Cr. 1. F.S.SS. Prereqs: PHYS 221 OR PHYS 241, MATH 166. Credit or enrollment in PHYS 232X . Laboratory experiments in fluid dynamics, electric forces and fields, electrical currents, DC circuits, magnetic forces and fields, and wave optics. PHYS 222 will be taught for the last time in Spring 2020; PHYS 232X, PHYS 232HX, and PHYS 232LX may be offered beginning Summer 2020.

PHYS 422X. Foundations of Quantum Computing. (Dual-listed with PHYS 522X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: MATH 207 or MATH 317, or equivalent with permission of instructor. Overview of quantum computation and quantum information processing from a physics perspective. Introduction to classical computation; primer on quantum mechanics; quantum circuits and quantum algorithms; physical realizations; applications and near-term quantum algorithms.

PHYS 522X. Foundations of Quantum Computing. (Dual-listed with PHYS 422X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: MATH 207 or MATH 317, or equivalent with permission of instructor. Overview of quantum computation and quantum information processing from a physics perspective. Introduction to classical computation; primer on quantum mechanics; quantum circuits and quantum algorithms; physical realizations; applications and near-term quantum algorithms.

PL P 581X. Experience in Plant Science Extension and Outreach. (Cross-listed with AGRON 581X, ENT 581X, and HORT 581X). Cr. 1. A supervised learning experience in several extension delivery methods used in the plant sciences. Participation in Iowa State University-based extension programs that may include field crop, horticulture, or Master Gardener programming.

PL P 597X. Lab Methods for Plant Pathology Research. (0-2) Cr. 2. Alt. S (offered 2021). Prereq: PL P 408 recommended. Basic laboratory skills in plant pathology research taught through hands-on experience. A variety of phytopathogens and topics explored.

POL S 210X. Iowa Politics. (3-0) Cr. 3. Politics of the state of Iowa. Demographics, attitudes, and institutions that drive public policy in Iowa, including the governor, state legislature, and judicial system; examination of Iowa's unique role in national politics; current events in Iowa politics.

POL S 230X. Introduction to Public Law. (3-0) Cr. 3. Historical views and theories of the state and of law, including concepts such as authority, power, legitimacy, freedom, and political obligation. Constitutionalism, public law, philosophy of jurisprudence.

POL S 237X. Introduction to Political Theory. (3-0) Cr. 3. Introduction to normative theories of politics; history of thought about and major thinkers of political relations. Liberalism, conservatism, socialism, authoritarianism, and the social contract.

POL S 352X. Migration and Refugees in the 21st Century . (Cross-listed with ANTHR 352X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. The historical, economic, social, political, and environmental factors that explain human mobility in the 21st century. The definition of a “migrant” with special emphasis on refugees (people who have been forcibly displaced across national borders). Ethnographic accounts of current refugee crises and of host state policy toward refugees.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

POL S 443X. Energy Policy. (Dual-listed with POL S 543X; cross-listed with BRT 543X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Junior classification. Energy policies and related social, environmental, and political issues. Energy problems and the impact of energy policies.

POL S 444X. Comparative Public Policy . (Dual-listed with 544). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: 6 credits in political science. How, why and to what effect governments deal with substantive policy problems differently. Environmental factors, ideologies, cultures, domestic policy making processes, and interest groups.

POL S 543X. Energy Policy. (Dual-listed with POL S 443X; cross-listed with BRT 543X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Junior classification. Energy policies and related social, environmental, and political issues. Energy problems and the impact of energy policies.

PSYCH 318X. Thinking and Decision Making . (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: PSYCH 101; STAT 101 or MATH 104 or equivalent . Understanding human reasoning and decision making, including evaluating evidence, judging probabilities, emotional influences, and social dilemmas, with emphasis on the mechanisms that underlie decision making.

PSYCH 349X. Psychology of Sexual Orientation . (Cross-listed with WGS 349X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: PSYCH 101, 3 additional credits in PSYCH . Development of major human sexual orientation identities (e.g., bisexual, gay, heterosexual, and lesbian) from a research perspective. How persons navigate life contexts (e.g., family, work, relationships) in connection with their sexual identity. Factors that enhance positive sexual orientation identity development.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

PSYCH 589X. Systems Neuroscience: Brain, Behavior, and Nutrition-Related Integrative Physiology. (Cross-listed with FS HN 589X, GERON 589X, NEURO 589X, NUTRS 589X). (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereqs: Graduate standing, or undergraduate with consent of instructor. Structural, functional, and biochemical aspects of brain and non-motor behavior across the human lifespan. Types of neuroimaging used to assess the brain. Current research is leveraged to gauge how nutrition, diseases related to nutrition, and associated physiological processes influence the brain, particularly for common developmental, psychological, and neurological disorders.

PSYCH 594NX. Quantitative Behavior Methods: Generalized Linear Models . (1-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: PSYCH 501 or equivalent. Specialized quantitative methods for social and behavioral research problems.

PSYCH 595JX. Seminar in Social Psychology: Industrial Organizational Psychology . Cr. 1-3. F. Prereq: 12 credits in Psychology .

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RELIG 215X. Religion and Popular Culture. (3-0) Cr. 3. Utilize the skills of the academic study of religion (bracketing, close reading, comparison, and critical thinking) to learn about religion in popular culture and how popular culture functions as a religion in modern society. Analysis of select films.

RELIG 277X. Religion and Society. (Cross-listed with SOC 277X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: SOC 134. Religion as a human construction, institution, activity, and identity. Connections between religion and other social institutions and processes.

RELIG 349X. Cognitive Science of Religion. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Minimum of 3 credits in RELIG ST or ENGL 250 or PSYCH 101. Using case studies from the world’s religions, this course examines cross-culturally occurring forms of religious expression in light of humanistic and scientific researches in the cognitive science of religion (CSR). Topics may include beliefs in god and other supernatural beings, afterlife beliefs, morality, rituals, and religious experiences, among others.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.


RELIG 359X. Quran. (3-0) Cr. 3 S. Prereq: Recommended: RELIG 358. A study of the Quran, the sacred text of Islam, with attention to its history, its major themes, and the diverse ways it is interpreted and applied.

Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

RESEV 604X. Advanced Qualitative Inquiry in Education . Cr. 3. F. Prereq: RESEV 603. Conceptions of data and analysis in qualitative methodologies; focus on applied topics in qualitative data analysis. Combination format of reading and discussion seminars and classroom workshops focusing on individual research projects (not for thesis or dissertation).

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S E 186X. Problem Solving in Software Engineering II. (0-2) Cr. 1 Prereq: S E 185. Group projects in software engineering. Work effectively in teams to solve problems and provide technical reports and presentations. Self-directed team based projects that are representative of problems faced by software engineers.

SCM 430X. Supply Chain Analytics. (3-0) Cr. 3. S., offered irregularly. Prereq: SCM 301. Introduces key methods and tools (i.e., analytics) applied to decision making in supply chain practice. Use of data, statistical and quantitative analysis, explanatory and predictive models, and fact-based management to drive decisions and actions. Descriptive, prescriptive or predictive use activities. Use of software (e.g., R and AnyLogic) to learn key concepts and techniques in analytics and apply those concepts to examples of supply chain decision making.

SCM 473X. War and Peace and Supply Chains . (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: SCM 301. Explore how supply chains do or do not support sustainable peace and human flourishing. Topics include how supply chain operations affect peace; how supply chains can be incentivized to encourage peace; how supply chain choices affect peace and what affects these choices; how supply chain certifications affect peace; tools available to supply chain managers to evaluate their decisions with regard to peace; and what business or supply chain models encourage peace.

SCM 540X. Enterprise Supply Chain Information Systems. (3-0) Cr. 3. The role of enterprise resource planning systems (ERP) in the supply chain. Hands-on experience with a major software application in use by many corporations to manage and improve the efficiency of their supply chain. Utilization of an ERP system to help students develop a more process-centric perspective about how a supply chain operates. Students will have the opportunity to use the SAP ERP software package on key processes that most ERP systems utilize (i.e., purchasing, MRP, forecasting, order fulfillment and pricing). Understanding the tactical and operational management of supply chains. Discussion of issues related to the creation of end-user value through supply chain cost reductions, service improvements, or both.

SOC 277X. Religion and Society. (Cross-listed with RELIG 277X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: SOC 134. Religion as a human construction, institution, activity, and identity. Connections between religion and other social institutions and processes.

SPAN 302AX. Mini-Modules for Global Professionals: Tourism and Hospitality. (1-0) Cr. 1 Prereq: SPAN 202, SPAN 297, or placement by departmental exam. Introduction to professional communication within specific professional cultures with strong preparation of relevant vocabulary related to professional fields in which high degrees of Spanish are spoken. Taught in Spanish. Each topic may only be taken once for credit.

SPAN 302BX. Mini-Modules for Global Professionals: Health and Medicine. (1-0) Cr. 1 Prereq: SPAN 202, SPAN 297, or placement by departmental exam. Introduction to professional communication within specific professional cultures with strong preparation of relevant vocabulary related to professional fields in which high degrees of Spanish are spoken. Taught in Spanish. Each topic may only be taken once for credit.

SPAN 302CX. Mini-Modules for Global Professionals: Criminal Justice and the Law. (1-0) Cr. 1 Prereq: SPAN 202, SPAN 297, or placement by departmental exam. Introduction to professional communication within specific professional cultures with strong preparation of relevant vocabulary related to professional fields in which high degrees of Spanish are spoken. Taught in Spanish. Each topic may only be taken once for credit.

SPAN 302DX. Mini-Modules for Global Professionals: Agriculture. (1-0) Cr. 1 Prereq: SPAN 202, SPAN 297, or placement by departmental exam. Introduction to professional communication within specific professional cultures with strong preparation of relevant vocabulary related to professional fields in which high degrees of Spanish are spoken. Taught in Spanish. Each topic may only be taken once for credit.

SPAN 302EX. Mini-Modules for Global Professionals: Cultural Entrepreneurship. (1-0) Cr. 1 Prereq: SPAN 202, SPAN 297, or placement by departmental exam. Introduction to professional communication within specific professional cultures with strong preparation of relevant vocabulary related to professional fields in which high degrees of Spanish are spoken. Taught in Spanish. Each topic may only be taken once for credit.

SPAN 302FX. Mini-Modules for Global Professionals: Science and Technology. (1-0) Cr. 1 Prereq: SPAN 202, SPAN 297, or placement by departmental exam. Introduction to professional communication within specific professional cultures with strong preparation of relevant vocabulary related to professional fields in which high degrees of Spanish are spoken. Taught in Spanish. Each topic may only be taken once for credit.

SPAN 302GX. Mini-Modules for Global Professionals: Natural Sciences. (1-0) Cr. 1 Prereq: SPAN 202, SPAN 297, or placement by departmental exam. Introduction to professional communication within specific professional cultures with strong preparation of relevant vocabulary related to professional fields in which high degrees of Spanish are spoken. Taught in Spanish. Each topic may only be taken once for credit.

SPAN 302JX. Mini-Modules for Global Professionals: Anthropology. (1-0) Cr. 1 Prereq: SPAN 202, SPAN 297, or placement by departmental exam. Introduction to professional communication within specific professional cultures with strong preparation of relevant vocabulary related to professional fields in which high degrees of Spanish are spoken. Taught in Spanish. Each topic may only be taken once for credit.

SPAN 305X. Spanish for Spanish Speakers . (Cross-listed with US LS 305X). Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Native or Heritage Speaker or Permission of Instructor. Intensive study and application of grammar concepts in the development of writing and reading skills in a dynamic cultural context centered on Hispanics in the U.S. Designed for native or heritage Spanish speakers with oral proficiency in Spanish but with little or no formal academic training in the language. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

SPAN 325X. Culture and Community: Iowa and Midwest Latino/as. (Cross-listed with US LS 325X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: US LS 211. Analysis and discussion of interdisciplinary texts examining the local and regional Latino/a immigration experience. Exploring Latino/a culture through participation in a community project. Assessed service learning component. Laws in the US.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

SPAN 378X. Hispanic Film Studies in English. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Analysis and interpretation of cinema in the Spanish-speaking world. Topics vary and may include, but are not limited to, film directors, genres, movements, historical survey, aesthetics, and cinematography. Readings, discussions, and papers in English.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

STB 590X. Special Topics. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. Prereq: Admission to the Graduate Program in Seed Technology and Business. Guided instruction and self-study on special topics relevant to seed technology and business.

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THTRE 301X. Theatre Performance Practicum. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S. Study, rehearsal, and performance of fully produced theatrical works. Engage in staging, ensemble building, character analysis, and performance while participating in the process of mounting a fully realized theatrical production.

THTRE 311X. Citizen Artistry: Theatre for Social Change . (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Exploration of the principles and practices of Citizen Artistry and Applied Theatre. Through case studies and projects students will learn how to use the power of theatre to cultivate social change, preparing them to be more innovative, engaged, and creative citizens of the world.

THTRE 353X. Acting for the Camera. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S. (Offered 2021). Theory, practice, and exploration of acting on camera with particular focus on professional terms, techniques, and practical experience.

TOX 444X. Aquatic Toxicology. (Dual-listed with A ECL 544X and TOX 544X; cross-listed with A ECL 444X). (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereqs: Graduate student status, or undergraduate status having declared a minor in Pharmacology and Toxicology, or having completed BIOL 211 and BIOL 212. An overview of interactions between anthropogenic chemicals and aquatic ecosystems. Topics include history of aquatic toxicology, methods of toxicity testing, and species responses to toxicants. Emphasis is on aquatic pollutants of emerging concern (e.g., nanoparticles, microplastics). Offered on a satisfactory-fail grading basis only.

TOX 544X. Aquatic Toxicology. (Dual-listed with A ECL 444X and TOX 444X; cross-listed with A ECL 544X). (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereqs: Graduate student status, or undergraduate status having declared a minor in Pharmacology and Toxicology, or having completed BIOL 211 and BIOL 212. An overview of interactions between anthropogenic chemicals and aquatic ecosystems. Topics include history of aquatic toxicology, methods of toxicity testing, and species responses to toxicants. Emphasis is on aquatic pollutants of emerging concern (e.g., nanoparticles, microplastics). Offered on a satisfactory-fail grading basis only.

TOX 569X. Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology. (Cross-listed with AN S 569X). Cr. 2. F. Prereqs: BBMB 301, BIOL 258 or AN S 331. Chemical agents that target developmental and reproductive systems in animals and humans, both male and female. The influence that timeline of developmental in utero and what part of reproductive organ have on outcome of environmental exposures will be developed. The physiological changes due to exposure, and mechanistic pathways activated by xenobiotics will be defined and the consequences of these changes will be explored.

TSM 449X. Applied Nondestructive Testing and Evaluation. (Dual-listed with TSM 549X). (2-3) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: MATH 140; TSM 240 . Scientific principles and rationale for non-destructive testing and evaluation. Assessment of material condition and detection of defects in manufacturing or in service. Testing methods and their application to agriculture and industry. Research project required for graduate credit.

TSM 549X. Applied Nondestructive Testing and Evaluation. (Dual-listed with TSM 449X). (2-3) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: MATH 140; TSM 240 . Scientific principles and rationale for non-destructive testing and evaluation. Assessment of material condition and detection of defects in manufacturing or in service. Testing methods and their application to agriculture and industry. Research project required for graduate credit.

TSM 579X. Advanced Topics in Safety Program Administration. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Graduate classification. Exploration and analysis of principles, concepts, and techniques related to the administration of occupational safety programs. The focus will be on program continous improvement and enhancement in pursuit of the goal of zero workplace injuries.

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U ST 123X. Introduction to Iowa State University . (1-0) Cr. R. F.S.SS. Foundation of knowledge, skills, and expectations all students need to navigate the university. Resources for academic success, integration into ISU community and culture. Offered on a satisfactory-fail grading basis only.

U ST 275X. Integrative Undergraduate Pre-Research. (1-0) Cr. 1. F. Skills for undergraduate students to prepare them for future research experiences. Students will learn about the benefits from being engaged in research, strategies for identifying research mentors, and skills to identify and apply for national research opportunities. Students will become familiar with core facets of research including hypothesis development, method selection, data collection, visualization, and analysis. Students will learn about the ethical issues facing research, local and national research regulatory agencies, and how to responsibly conduct research. Students will learn about tools to enhance their networking capabilities, identify potential careers research skills, and opportunities to advance their professional development. Satisfactory-fail only.

U ST 316X. Leadership in Peer Education. Cr. 2. S. This course will provide emerging student leaders preparing to be peer educators or peer mentors with an understanding of peer education. Students will be introduced to foundational theories of peer education and behavior change, connect their learning to previous experiences, and apply their learning to practice various peer education skills. Students will be expected to learn and practice essential peer education skills including effective listening, responding and referral, small group facilitation & dialogue, and developing inclusive environments. Satisfactory-fail only.

US LS 305X. Spanish for Spanish Speakers . (Cross-listed with SPAN 305X). Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Native or Heritage Speaker or Permission of Instructor. Intensive study and application of grammar concepts in the development of writing and reading skills in a dynamic cultural context centered on Hispanics in the U.S. Designed for native or heritage Spanish speakers with oral proficiency in Spanish but with little or no formal academic training in the language. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

US LS 325X. Culture and Community: Iowa and Midwest Latino/as. (Cross-listed with SPAN 325X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: US LS 211. Analysis and discussion of interdisciplinary texts examining the local and regional Latino/a immigration experience. Exploring Latino/a culture through participation in a community project. Assessed service learning component. Laws in the US.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

US LS 360X. Latinas and Victimization. (Cross-listed with CJ ST 360X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Intersections of race/ethnicity, class, gender, culture, acculturation, and immigration/migration in the victimization experiences of Latina women interacting with criminal justice systems and services. Topics include: domestic/intimate partner violence, sexual assault, human trafficking among Hispanic, Latina, and Chicana women, and the impact of language barriers, abuser threats of deportation, social and institutional discrimination and racism, cultural norms, and cultural insensitivity among first responders and service providers on help-seeking, well-being, and interactions with the criminal justice system.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

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V C S 318X. Advanced Small Animal Oncology. Cr. 1. S. Prereq:  VM3 Status; V C S 444 and B M S 443. Provide advanced instruction in medical oncology, radiation oncology, and surgical oncology.
General learning objectives include demonstrating the ability to utilize information from the physical exam and historical findings to direct appropriate diagnostics and staging based on a specific cancer diagnosis. Offered on a satisfactory-fail grading basis only.

V C S 403X. Clinical Cardiology II. (1-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: V C S 444. Elective course in clinical cardiology. Emphasis on common congenital and acquired cardiac diseases of companion animals. Builds on foundation of basic clinical cardiac knowledge obtained in V C S 444; expands to cover additional diseases in greater depth (e.g. infective endocarditis, systemic and pulmonary hypertension, heartworm disease, feline arterial thromboembolism, bradyarrhythmias and cardiac pacing, congenital heart diseases and interventional correction). Satisfactory-fail only.

V C S 404X. Topics in Emergency and Critical Care. (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereq: Third year veterinary medicine program. Provide an introduction of common topics in emergency and critical care in companion animals. General learning goals for students in this course include developing the ability to utilize physical exam skills and historical findings to triage patients and assess stability.

V C S 406X. Introduction to Captive Wild Animal Medicine. (1-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Offered to Veterinary Students in their 3rd or 4th year of curriculum. Topics covering the health and welfare of non-domestic animals in captivity. Regulations specific to exotic animal ownership and exhibition will be covered. Students will discuss diseases which affect multiple taxon groups, and learn about interface diseases. Specific topics regarding the veterinary care of exotic canids, felids, ungulates, primates, Old-World Camelids, exotic equids and avian species will be discussed. Laboratories will introduce remote-delivery and restraint devices, dangerous animal handling techniques (including venomous snake handling techniques), contraception for non-domestic animals, and extra-label use of medications and vaccines in non-domestic species.

V C S 423X. Zoo Preceptorship. Cr. V. 2-12. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Prereq: Fourth-year classification in veterinary medicine. Completion of V C S 405 and/or V C S 406X, or permission of instructor. Elective course in veterinary practice under the guidance of trained zoo veterinarians in approved practice settings. Maximum of 12 credits.

V C S 484X. Clinical Practice in Diverse Communities. Cr. 2. Prereq: Fourth-year classification in Veterinary Medicine. Two week rotation for fourth year veterinary students working with equine patients both in the hospital and field settings. This rotation includes a community service component, which will include lecture time on relevant topics and a veterinary service trip to the Crow Creek Tribal Reservation in Fort Thompson, SD. Five-day trip, providing experience in preparing, setting up, and running an equine and small animal veterinary clinic to serve the tribal community.

V MPM 360X. Global Health. (Cross-listed with MICRO 360X and GLOBE 360X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Biol 211. Global Health explores health and its determinants across the world with a commitment to the many disciplines and variables that influence health. The course will stress the interconnectedness of humans, animals, and the environment, with emphasis on poor countries. The course is designed to challenge the typical understanding of what impacts health and to stimulate the student to take an entrepreneurial approach to finding solutions. Current events will be a major focus of the class. Within the context of health and disease, topics will include poverty, infectious diseases, gender, social media, climate change, animal health, agriculture, and more. Each student will complete one case study on a topic related to global health. Outside reading and films will be required for each class meeting. There will be four exams. Students will also be expected to sign up for Twitter and use Black Board.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

V PTH 403X. Inroduction to Pathology II. (Cross-listed with BIOL 403X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: V PTH 402/BIOL 402. Continuation of pathology topics begun in V PTH/BIOL VPTH 402. How specific organ systems respond to injury using principles and information covered in VPTH 402/ BIOL 402. Study of a set of prototypical diseases that affect humans and animals.

V PTH 476X. Clinical Veterinary Parasitology. Cr. 1-2. Repeatable. S.SS. Irr. Prereqs: V PTH 376, 4th year classification in Vet Med. Two week clinical rotation in clinical veterinary parasitology. Students will investigate parasitic disease with supervision of the instructors. Variable amount of travel to farm or sites will be required. Biosecurity: All students must follow current College policies regarding animal contact following foreign travel.

VDPAM 420PX. Applied Poultry Production Medicine Preceptorship. Cr. 1-6. F.S.SS. Repeatable. Prereqs: Fourth year classification in veterinary medicine required. VDPAM 408 and/or VDPAM 498 strongly recommended. Unique, highly relevant, hands-on veterinary experience for participating students. Development of poultry-specific practice skill sets. Documented experience that is highly valued by future poultry employers. Enhanced cultural and professional awareness for participating students through interaction with active poultry practitioners. Exposure to diverse poultry practice and production environments. Graduation restrictions: Up to 6 credits to count for graduation.

VDPAM 421TX. Great Plains Veterinary Educational Center: Food Animal Clinical Care and Treatment. Cr. 1. SS. Prereqs: Fourth year classification in veterinary medicine; ability to provide own transportation to each site.  This course is designed to achieve hands-on and critical thinking skills necessary to provide clinical care to cattle and sheep. Student needs will be met through structured discussions and accompanying the veterinarians in daily care of the animals at USMARC.

VDPAM 466X. Preceptorship in Animal Welfare. Cr. 1-6. F.S.SS. Repeatable. Prereq: Fourth year classification in veterinary medicine; permission of instructor. Preceptorship in animal welfare with emphasis on animal welfare assessment, policy and problem solving. Mentors include practicing veterinarians, researchers, and/or animal welfare organizations.

VDPAM 471CX. Animal Reproduction: Comparative . Cr. 2. Repeatable. Prereq: Fourth year classification in veterinary medicine. Elective comparative clinical assignment in Theriogenology with caseload management in Food Animal, Equine, Small Animal and Small Ruminants sections. Rotation through these different sections will depend on the caseload (by species)and include routine breeding management, semen collection and cryopreservation in different species, advanced laparoscopic and non-surgical procedures for insemination and embryo flushing/transfer, pregnancy diagnosis as well as management of reproductive emergencies.

VDPAM 471EX. Animal Reproduction: Equine Reproduction. Cr. 2. Repeatable. Prereq: Fourth-year classification in veterinary medicine. Elective clinical assignment in Equine Theriogenology involving both mare and stallion breeding management, cool-shipped semen preparation and semen cryopreservation, embryo transfer, foaling of high-risk pregnant mares as well as normal mares, breeding soundness exams of the mare and stallion, treatment of retained fetal membranes and neonatal care.

VDPAM 471FX. Animal Reproduction: Food Animal Theriogenology . Cr. 2. Repeatable. Prereq: Fourth year classification in veterinary medicine. Elective clinical assignment in Food Animal Theriogenology involving male and female breeding soundness exams, dystocia management, advanced diagnostic and surgical procedures, surgical and nonsurgical insemination programs in small ruminants, and semen cryopreservation. Medical and surgical correction of reproductive disorders in cattle, swine and small ruminants. Biosecurity: All students must follow current College policies regarding animal contact following foreign travel.

VDPAM 498X. Poultry Medicine. Cr. 2. SS. Prereq: VM4 students or by permission of instructor. Two-week senior elective to introduce students into poultry production medicine in the Midwest. Students will participate in routine flock monitoring, biosecurity reviews, disease investigations involving outbreaks in commercial and backyard poultry operations, and have a basic understanding of the poultry industry and poultry diseases. Involves didactic lectures in the classroom, field trips to poultry farms, and necropsies. This course requires students to do out-of-state travel and overnight stays.

VDPAM 560X. Ecology of Infectious Diseases. (3-0) Cr. 3. Topics of applied ecology of infectious diseases. Specific objectives include: a) understanding dynamics of pathogen transmission within and between population; b) how to reduce risk of pathogen introduction in populations; c) how to early detect pathogens and classify herds according to disease status; d) how to quantify pathogen transmission and impact in animal populations; e) applying and measure the effect of interventions to manipulate disease transmission dynamics within and between populations. Develop skills to prevent, detect and/or significantly control/eliminate animal health issues from animal populations. Learn how to quantify health issues and estimate the value of interventions to influence and mitigate health problems.

VDPAM 562X. Applied Diagnostic Technologies and Medicine for Infectious Disease . (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Enrolled in a graduate program. Introductory epidemiology and/or infectious disease course encouraged. Veterinary medicine background beneficial. Veterinary diagnostics and diagnostic medicine for infectious diseases in animal populations, mostly livestock, and clinical applications. Specific objectives include: understanding diagnostic process; mechanics of laboratory diagnostic methods; test development and validation; optimizing diagnostic outcomes; and applying diagnostic data to disease investigation and/or intervention. Additionally, students are expected to present a diagnostic relevant subject and participate in case review and discussion. On-line and can be asynchronous from time to time.

VDPAM 564X. Animal Welfare Science and Research . Cr. 3. S. Animal welfare is increasingly a key component of societal decisions about animal use, sustainable development and human-animal relationships. Understanding animal welfare as a scientific discipline, with primary focus on veterinary, biomedical and animal science disciplines. Explore fundamental and applied approaches to animal welfare science, including experimental design, data analysis and interpretation of results. Topics selected will reflect student interests, and may include animal welfare assessment and assurance, animal cognition, pain assessment and mitigation, and animal models used in biomedical research.

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W F S 278. Introduction to Global Film. (Cross-listed with WLC 278). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Introduction to the cinema of non-English speaking regions and cultures of the world through representative subtitled films, lectures, and readings. Topics vary according to faculty interest. Emphasis on selected national cinemas and film as a mode of cultural expression as well as on diverse cultural contexts of cinema.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

WGS 349X. Psychology of Sexual Orientation . (Cross-listed with PSYCH 349X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: PSYCH 101, 3 additional credits in PSYCH . Development of major human sexual orientation identities (e.g., bisexual, gay, heterosexual, and lesbian) from a research perspective. How persons navigate life contexts (e.g., family, work, relationships) in connection with their sexual identity. Factors that enhance positive sexual orientation identity development.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

WGS 410X. Human Trafficking. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: WGS 201 or 3 credits in WGS or W S at the 300 level or above. Issues related to human trafficking and modern-day slavery in the US and world. History of and concepts defining forms of violence experienced by trafficking victims and methods used to recruit and control victims. Students will learn how to educate others about this crime against humanity. Examines international, federal, and state legislation to prevent human trafficking.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

WLC 210X. Introduction to Asian American Studies. (Cross-listed with ANTHR 210X). (3-0) Cr. 3. An interdisciplinary and chronological examination of Asian American immigration experiences from the early 19th century to the 21st century.Focus on how these immigration histories are accompanied by changing racial constructions. Discussion of racial stereotyping, the model minority myth, identity development, and efforts for social justice.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

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