Experimental Courses 2021-2022, G-O

G H I J K L M N O

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GEN 113X. Exploring Possibilities in Life Sciences. (Cross-listed with BIOL 113X). (.5-.5) Cr. 1. Seminar focusing on introducing students to life science fields and careers. Explores interdisciplinary career paths and guidance on strategies for success in achieving career goals. Satisfactory-fail only.

GEN 114X. Experiential Learning and Explorations in Life Sciences. (Cross-listed with BIOL114X). (1-0) Cr. 1. A second year experiential learning course focused on careers in life science fields. Sections offer themed learning allowing students to choose an immersive experience in an area of interest. Sections utilize hands-on engagement, field trips to on- and off-campus locations, and small group discussions with speakers working in different life science careers. Satisfactory-fail only.

GEN 299X. Introduction to Undergraduate Research. (Cross-listed with BIOL 299X) Cr 2-6. F.S.SS. Identify a research opportunity on campus and conduct guided research under the supervision.

GEN 351X. Principles of Domestic Animal Genetics . (Cross-listed with AN S 351X) (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: BIOL 211, BIOL 212, and STAT 101 or 104.  Foundation of genetics, genomics, and statistical concepts in domestic animal populations.

GEN 466X. Molecular and Genome Evolution. (Cross-listed with BIOL 466X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: BIOL 315, BIOL 313 or GEN 313. It is now possible to sequence and study genomes with astonishing precision and depth. Every day brings new discoveries about life, about genomes, about the molecular evolution of organisms and their genomes, and how these features are shaped by the evolutionary processes of drift and selection. Explore fundamentals of gene and genome evolution, and how these processes are shaped by ecological context and organismal history.

GENET 693X. Entrepreneurship for Graduate Students in Science and Engineering. (Cross-listed with AGRON 693X, BCB 693X, E E 693X, ENGR 693X, and M E 693X). (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.  Prereq: Graduate student status and completion of at least one semester of graduate coursework. Understanding key topics of starting a technology based company, from development of technology-led idea to early-stage entrepreneurial business. Concepts discussed include: entrepreneurship basics, starting a business, funding your business, protecting your technology/business IP.Subject matter experts and successful, technology-based entrepreneurs will provide real world examples from their experience with entrepreneurship. Learn about the world class entrepreneurship ecosystem at ISU and Central Iowa. Satisfactory-fail only.

GERON 589X. Systems Neuroscience: Brain, Behavior, and Nutrition-Related Integrative Physiology. (Cross-listed with FS HN 589X, NEURO 589X, NUTRS 589X, PSYCH 589X). (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereqs: Graduate standing, or undergraduate with consent of instructor. Structural, functional, and biochemical aspects of brain and non-motor behavior across the human lifespan. Types of neuroimaging used to assess the brain. Current research is leveraged to gauge how nutrition, diseases related to nutrition, and associated physiological processes influence the brain, particularly for common developmental, psychological, and neurological disorders.

GLOBE 330X. Global Health Disparities. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Junior classification. Historical and contemporary factors contributing to disparities in health outcomes for persons disadvantaged by income, location, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and abilities. Analysis and evaluation of health promotional materials, such as campaigns, and community-based interventions focused on reducing global health disparities .
Meets U. S. Diversity Requirement.

GR ST 698X. Graduate Internship: Part-Time CPT. Cr. R. F.S.SS. Prereq: Permission required from Graduate College. Internship course for graduate students completing part-time internship. Internship is fewer than 20 hours per week or fewer than 90 days. International students must have approved part-time CPT prior to the semester of enrollment. Satisfactory-Fail.

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H S 167X. The Science of Health Behavior Change. (3-0) Cr. 3. SS. A theory- and evidence-based approach to the understanding of health behavior change.Practical approaches to promote introspection, increase self-awareness, motivation, confidence, and alignment between lifestyle and personal values.
Meets U. S. Diversity Requirement.

HCI 523X. Qualitative Research Methods in HCI . (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Introduction to qualitative research methods specific to human computer interaction and user experience research, both from an academic perspective and applied industry perspective. Conduct, write, and critique qualitative research. Examples and projects will be drawn from human computer interaction domains, e.g., mobile apps, web applications, automated vehicle, self-checkout stations, etc. Methods include focus groups, interviews, surveys, and many others.

HCI 530X. Perspectives in HCI. (3-0). Cr. 3. SS. An exploration of different perspectives in HCI that covers: inclusive and humane design; the intersection of technology and race, gender, age, and class; technology around the world; the impact of technology on democracy; social engineering and cybersecurity; and other relevant topics students would like to explore.

HCI 584X. Python Application Development in HCI. (3-0). Cr. 3. SS. Prereqs: Working knowledge of Python equivalent to HCI 574. Must be enrolled in the HCI graduate program. Completion or concurrent enrollment in the HCI Design requirement. Implement Python code and write design documents (“specs”) and complement their code with sufficiently detailed documentation in development of a large Python project of the student's choosing. Typical development process: idea, specification, prototyping and implementation (including debugging, testing, refactoring) and documentation and result in a demo-able final product. Fulfills the implementation requirement of the HCI program.

HCI 608X. Social Media and Education. (Cross-listed with EDUC 608X). Cr. 3. Prereq: 12 graduate credits. Increase understanding of how social media is changing traditional concepts of identity, literacy, citizenship and more. Develop an online social presence through active social media participation.

HCM 301X. Introduction to the US Healthcare Industry. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: Sophomore classification. Overview of the US healthcare delivery system for healthcare managers. Study of the theoretical basis for the system, its history and development, the resources that comprise it, as well as its overall planning, organization, management, evaluation, quality, professions, and its major health policy issues. Examine procedures of how healthcare policy is developed at the federal and state levels, considers the influence of all constituencies in policy formation, and compares existing policy and policy formation in other countries to the U.S. Explore how the healthcare policy environment affects the work of healthcare managers. 

HCM 302X. Economics for Healthcare Managers. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Sophomore classification. Explore the economic influences and underpinnings of the healthcare delivery system. Examine the importance of economics in health care decisions, both demand and supply-side factors, and how third-party payers and public policy influence consumption and production of healthcare. Introduction to evaluation of clinical outcomes using cost-effectiveness and other decision-analysis tools. Other topics include asymmetry of information, comparative healthcare systems, and healthcare policy. 

HCM 303X. Healthcare Quality Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Sophomore classification. The manager’s role in improving healthcare quality and outcomes, including clinical and organizational improvement, and quality improvement practices. Explore how healthcare delivery systems can better measure outcomes from both patient and organizational perspectives. Analysis of quality improvement programs and examination of their adaptability to the healthcare environment.

HCM 404X. Economic Evaluations of Healthcare Interventions. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Introduction to cost-effectiveness analysis in the healthcare context. Examination of different forms of economic evaluations for healthcare interventions or technology, and how this impacts managerial decision-making. Approaches covered include cost analysis, cost-effectiveness, cost-utility, and cost-benefit; specific methods introduced include decision analysis, Markov models, and different ways of conducting sensitivity analysis. Students will learn how to use these methods for evidence-based and ethical decisions in healthcare and other types of organizations.

HCM 504X. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Graduate status. Introduction to economic evaluations of health care interventions or technology. Examines forms of economic evaluations, including cost analysis, cost-effectiveness, cost-utility, and cost-benefit and how they apply to managerial decision-making in healthcare organizations. Focus is on cost-effectiveness analysis as a decision-oriented tool that takes both costs and consequences of actions into account in a systematic way. Methods such as decision analysis, Markov models, and different way of conducting sensitivity analysis. Ethical implications of using cost-effectiveness analysis for managerial decision-making in healthcare organizations are discussed.

HD FS 387X. Applying Evidence Based Practices in Human Services. (3-0) Cr. 3. F S. Prereq: HD FS 224, 226, 227, 234, or Psych 230. Exploration of evidence-based practices in human services. Exposure to and practice of the skills required to work with individuals and families in engagement, needs assessment, development of human services interventions, and data-based progress monitoring evaluation phases of human services. Practical strategies such as motivational interviewing and behavioral techniques will be covered.

HG ED 538X. Foundations of Engineering Education. (Cross-listed with ENGR 538X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Engineering graduate students or instructor permission required. Introduction to the field of engineering education, with an emphasis on engineering education history, existing challenges, teaching and learning pedagogies and theories, research opportunities, and research methodologies. The course goal is to develop students as scholars and to have students think critically about engineering and education. Students will apply the knowledge gained from this course to propose a research project related to their own discipline. The proposal is intended to help students learn and apply the key elements of engineering education research. This course is intended for students with a variety of interests and career goals, including those interested in learning to conduct engineering education research, exploring research discoveries about teaching and learning, and engaging with the engineering education community.

HG ED 552X. Introduction to Higher Education in the United States . (3-0) Cr. 3. Overview of higher education in the United States, including a brief history, the functions, organization, external influences, funding, and the major issues impacting postsecondary institutions today.

HG ED 572X. Resource Management in Higher Education. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. An examination of resource management in higher education. Planning, allocation, and administration of financial, human, and physical resources in colleges and universities.

HG ED 581X. Community College Partnerships. (3-0). Cr. 3. S. Overview of the community environment in which community colleges serve and the external groups with whom they partner, including environmental scanning, partner development, strategic planning, and maintaining relationships.

HG ED 663X. Community College Students. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Comprehensive understanding of students in American community colleges while enhancing research skills and a scholar-practitioner approach to working with students. Examine the curricula in place that serve a diverse student population with different educational objectives. Examine student types found in comprehensive community colleges including transfer, career & technical, adult basic education, and English language learners.

HG ED 668X. Workforce, Economic & Community Development in Community Colleges. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Admission to the Ed.D. in Education program. This course provides an overview of how community colleges influence workforce, economic, and community development through their education missions.

HIST 322X. History of Modern Imperialism. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Sophomore Designation. Introduction to the theoretical, interpretive, and chronological elements of modern imperialism during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; the relationships between the colonizing world of the Global North and the colonized world of the Global South. Topics include but are not limited to political and economic theories; historical critiques; constructions of race, gender, and sex; imperial violence and colonial genocide; and cultural effects in the colony and the metropole.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

HIST 469X. History of Racial Violence in Europe and the United States, 1865-1945. (Cross-listed with AF AM 469X). (3-0). Cr. 3. Irr. S. History of racial and genocidal violence comparing the experiences of Black, Latino/a/x, Native, and Asian peoples in the United States with Jewish people, the Romani, and people of African descent in Europe. The class focuses on the forms of individual and state-sponsored violence, culminating in the Holocaust. Field trip to Washington, D.C.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

HIST 598X. Methods of Teaching History/Social Sciences . (Dual-listed with HIST 498 and Cross-listed with EDUC 498). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Concurrent enrollment in EDUC/HIST 480A or EDUC 591; Admitted to Educator Preparation Program and 3 credits in subject-matter field.Theories and processes of teaching and learning secondary history/social sciences. Emphasis on development and enactment of current methods, assessments, and curriculum materials for providing appropriate learning experiences.

HORT 132X. Wedding and Event Floral Design (1-2) Cr. 2. F.S. Prereq: HORT 131. Principles of design and proper mechanics for ceremony flowers, reception flowers, personal flowers, bridal bouquets, and event florals. Flower and plant materials that are commonly used in the event industry. Plan, design, cost, order, and create florals for a wedding, then present as the final project for implementation.

HORT 233X. House Plants and Interiorscaping. (1-2) Cr. 2. F.S. Basic introduction to indoor houseplants and interiorscapes. Understand plant selection, identification, maintenance, and problem solving. Learn current houseplant trends, commercial interior plant design, and installation. A beneficial course for students with an interest in house plants, retail plant sales, Interiorscaping, event design, or gardening.

HSP M 358X. Economics for Senior Living Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: HSP M 248X. Overview of supply and demand, product/service development, consumption, and financials of the senior living industry from a management perspective.

HSP M 393CX. HSP M Workshop: Innovations in Chocolate I. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S. Introduction to the usage of chocolate in the food industry. Properties of chocolate and how to utilize to create chocolate-based recipes and mold chocolate shapes. Learning activities to apply theoretical concepts and gain experience in chocolate melting, tempering, and mixing techniques. Lectures are online.

HSP M 393MX. Hospitality Management Industry Workshop: Molecular Gastronomy. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.. Introduction to molecular gastronomy as a type of modern and innovative cuisine through both sweet and savory culinary applications. Develop and apply basic and advanced culinary skills. Basic principles of chemistry, biology, and physics and how they can be used in combination with culinary arts techniques to create unique culinary experiences.

HSP M 420X. Fairs, Festivals, and Events Management. (Cross-listed with EVENT 420X). (3-0) Cr. 3.  Prereq: HSP M 320 or EVENT 320. Examine current issues within fairs, festivals, and special events. Emphasis placed on the evolution of exhibitions and events to modern day fairs and festivals, along with the processes necessary for operating fairs, festivals, and special events.

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I E 420X. Engineering Problem Solving with R. (Dual-listed with I E 520X). Cr. 3. S. Prereq: An introductory statistics course: Stat 231 or equivalent. Statistical analysis and engineering problem solving using R programming language. Data manipulation. Exploratory data analysis. Statistical quality assurance. Basic statistical analysis. R Markdown. Simulation. Conditional expressions, loops, and functions. Matrices. High level data visualizations. Data extraction from text. Optimization. Logistic regression. High performance computing tools. Project required for graduate credits.

I E 422X. Design and Analysis Applications for System Improvement. (1-6) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: Credit in I E 222, I E 271, I E 305, I E 361, and credit or enrollment in I E 413; OR permission of instructor. A team-based design project that is large and open-ended drawing from previous IE courses. Application of engineering design including process improvement methods to produce solutions while considering realistic constraints . Can be used as capstone design experience or as engineering topic elective.

I E 444X. Micro/Nano Scale Additive Printing . (Dual-listed with I E 544). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: I E 348 or equivalent manufacturing engineering course. Introduction of physical theory, design, analysis, fabrication, and characterization of micro/nano scale fabrication and manufacturing systems; introduction of micro/nano scale additive manufacturing; and deep understanding of additive printing for micro/nano scale applications. Focus on the fabrication/manufacturing of important types of microstructures used in micro/nano devices using additive printing, and the techniques and tools used to characterize them. Students are expected to finish a team projected related applying additive printing experimentally or theoretically to the design of a sensor.

I E 470X. Systems Engineering and Project Management. (Dual-listed with I E 570). Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: STAT 231 or STAT 305 or equivalent; I E 305 or equivalent; Junior Classification. Systems view of projects and the processes by which they are implemented. Focuses on qualitative and quantitative tools and techniques of project management. Topics will include organizational structure types; project selection methodologies; simulation and optimization; and earned value management. Case studies will be included, and a group project required.

I E 520X. Engineering Problem Solving with R. (Dual-listed with I E 420X). Cr. 3. S. Prereq: An introductory statistics course: Stat 231 or equivalent. Statistical analysis and engineering problem solving using R programming language. Data manipulation. Exploratory data analysis. Statistical quality assurance. Basic statistical analysis. R Markdown. Simulation. Conditional expressions, loops, and functions. Matrices. High level data visualizations. Data extraction from text. Optimization. Logistic regression. High performance computing tools. Project required for graduate credits.

I E 580X. Introduction of Project Management for Thesis Research. (Cross-listed with CH E 580X and M S E 580X). (1-0) Cr. 1. F.S. Tools and skills of Project Management (PM) adapted from industry to improve efficiency in thesis research. Project charter initiation for thesis, timeline and meeting scheduling tools, expectation management, and communication with advisors. Practice of the PM skills using student’s own thesis. Presentation of a project charter. Demonstration of knowledge of related PM skills and the ability of utilizing these skills for thesis research. Sharing thesis ideas and learning experiencein the Graduate for Advancing Professional Skills (GAPS) learning community. Satisfactory-fail grading only.

I E 592X. Advanced Analytics Projects. (1-2) Cr. 3. Prereq: Graduate standing in Industrial Engineering or permission of instructor . Practical experience in data analytics and decision modeling, along with communication and teamwork, through the development and completion of an industry project. Application of descriptive and prescriptive analytics methods to formulate and solve a complex engineering analytics problem. Development of decision support skills including problem definition, model building, data visualization, and extraction of managerial insights.

I E 635X. Optimization with Decision Diagrams. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: I E 510 and I E 534. Advanced dynamic programming for optimization. Discrete and continuous state-space models. Deterministic and stochastic models. Infinite-horizon models. Recursive formulations. Decision diagrams for integer programs. Exact decision diagrams. Relaxation and restriction of decision diagrams. Specialized branch-and-bound strategies. Variable orderings. Applications of decision diagrams in various areas of optimization.

I E 645X. Laser-based Advanced Manufacturing. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: I E 545 or I E 549 or an equivalent graduate-level manufacturing engineering course. Concepts and fundamentals of laser-matter interaction. Design, optimization and analysis of laser shock processing and laser heating-based manufacturing. Advanced manufacturing simulations. Literature review, data analysis, and academic writing/presentation of laser-based advanced manufacturing research.

IA LL 334J. Topic in Ecology and Sustainability: Environmental Nonfiction. (2-0) Cr. 2. SS. Learn the ways scientists can better communicate discoveries and ideas. Learn the importance of identifying your audience and how you can adapt your writing based upon your understanding of those varying audiences.

IA LL 412X. Restoration Ecology. (2-0) Cr. 2. SS. Ecological principles for restoration of native ecosystems; establishment (site preparation, selection of seed mixes, planting techniques) and management (fire, mowing, weed control) of native vegetation; evaluation of restorations; emphasis on prairie restoration and wetland vegetation.

IA LL 423X. Prairie Ecology I. (2-0) Cr. 2. SS. Prereq: Familiarity with basic principles in biological sciences and ecology. Basic patterns and underlying physical and biotic causes of both regional and local distributions of plants and animals of North American prairies; field and laboratory analyses and projects.

IA LL 424X. Prairie Ecology II. (2-0) Cr. 2. SS. Prereq: Familiarity with basic principles in biological sciences and ecology. Basic patterns and underlying physical and biotic causes of both regional and local distributions of plants and animals of North American prairies; field and laboratory analyses and projects.

IA LL 425X. Introduction to Research and Inquiry. (2-0) Cr. 2. SS. How data transforms to information and ultimately knowledge through scientific investigations; examinations and applications include steps formulating the scientific method using 21st-century data, conditions, and related challenges; deliverables include a thoroughly documented scientific experiment beginning with research questions and hypotheses, recommended methods, and concluding with anticipated results.

IA LL 483X. Cyanobacteria and Green Algae. (2-0) Cr. 2. SS. Ecology, morphological structure, phylogeny, and taxonomy of freshwater algae based on field material collected; emphasis on genus-level identifications, biodiversity, ecology; habitat visits to lakes, fens, streams, rivers; algal ecology.

IND D 345X. Sketchnoting. (3-0) Cr. 1-3. Focus on student learning engagement and knowledge retention through visual note-taking. Introduction to sketchnoting as a creative and non-traditional visual note-taking methodology fostering active listening and synthesis. Learn to create visual libraries as they pertain to select subjects and practice visual notetaking through live lectures and study note development. Reflection sketchnotes will provide students an opportunity to discover their own learning progress and connections across courses.

IND D 402X. Industrial Design Studio VI: Designing for Social Impact. (12-0) Cr. 6 F.S.1. Prereq: IND D 301. Advanced topics focused on industrial design applications in service-learning and community engagement projects. Topics vary each time offered. Meets Industrial Design Experiential Learning Requirements.

IND D 565X. STEM Literacy, Social Justice and Critical Thinking. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: For Juniors, seniors, and graduate students. The importance and the role of Technological and Engineering Literacy in the society past, present, and the future. Definitions, history, the important role and place of social justice and why technological and engineering literacy are connected to social justice and related areas. We will be reading book chapters, leading research papers, and will connect to the ideas and development at the national and international efforts in this area.

INTST 250X. The World’s Regions in a Global Context . (3-0). Cr. 3. F.S. Comparative study of the world's regions beyond North America (Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, and the Middle East) within the context of globalization and regionalization. Framework for understanding how environmental, demographic, political and socio-cultural relationships in each region are affected by geographic connections. Exploration of how these relationships will shape future regional geographies.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

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JL MC 140X. Identity, Diversity and the Media. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Understand perspectives and biases within journalism, advertising and public relations content, including content shared through social-media platforms. Analyze content generated by others. Topics include media literacy, source evaluation, portrayals of diverse groups, identification of diverse sources and strategies for reducing bias in media work.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

JL MC 414X. Digital Newsroom. (1-4) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: Jl MC 344 or 346 or 347; C+ or better in JL MC 202 or JL MC 206.  Fundamentals of digital content creation for use in online news service. Emphasis on reporting, writing and editing skills with additional training in digitizing content. Includes production of photography, slide shows, audio production, video production and blogs.

JL MC 503X. Advanced Communication Research Methods: Quantitative. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: JL MC 502 or equivalent basic research method course; or permission of instructor. In-depth examination of quantitative research methods in journalism and mass communication, including surveys, experiments and media content analyses. Data collection, data analysis and presentation of research findings. Application of quantitative research designs to journalism and mass communication cases.

JL MC 504X. Advanced Communication Research Methods: Qualitative. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: JL MC 502 or equivalent research methods course. In-depth examination of qualitative methods in journalism and mass communication research. Social scientific and humanistic modes of inquiry. Discussions of critical-cultural theory, design and presentation of qualitative studies, and application of qualitative research methods in communication.

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KIN 294AX. Practicum in Adult Fitness Assessment: Techniques and Interpretation . Cr. 1-6. F.S. Prereq: KIN 258. Introduction to principles and techniques involved in conducting and interpreting physical fitness assessments in adults. Students interested in gaining practical experience in health coaching should enroll in the associated practicum course (KIN 294B). Satisfactory-Fail.

KIN 294BX. Practicum in Adult Fitness Assessment: Supervised Experience . Cr. 1-2. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Prereq: KIN 258; KIN 294A (or concurrent enrollment) . Conduct and interpret physical fitness assessments with adults. Protocols for assessing aerobic, muscular fitness, and flexibility, and will have opportunities to practice and refine these skills in supervised adult fitness settings. Satisfactory-Fail.

KIN 466X. Exercise for Mental Health . (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: KIN 366, or senior status in Psychology, or Instructor permission. Understand the state-of-the-knowledge of the mental health benefits of physical activity both in the prevention and in the treatment of clinical mental health and other psychological conditions. Focus on boththe neurobiological bases of mental health disorders and the effects ofexercise on these factors. Practical approach to encouraging changes inphysical activity across populations suffering from psychological disturbances as part of treatment.

KIN 474X. Music and Neuroscience. (Cross-listed with MUSIC 474X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: KIN 372 or permission by instructor. Understanding how music is processed in the brain and the implications for healthy care and education. Online discussions about how music changes all aspects of the brain from neurotransmitters to cortical reorganization.

KIN 491X. Undergraduate Teaching Experience. Cr. 1-2. F.S.SS. Prereq: Junior/Senior status and permission of instructor. Undergraduate teaching assistant opportunity in Kinesiology.

KIN 553X. Molecular Physiology and Metabolism. (Cross-listed with NUTRS 553X). (2-0) Cr. 1. Prereq: Biochemistry, physiology, or permission of instructor . Focuses on the biochemical, cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate whole body, cell and tissue-specific fuel metabolism. An integration of mechanisms regulating metabolic signaling responses to alterations in nutritional status (e.g., starvation, obesity) or stressors such as exercise, nutrient stress, aging and disease. The contribution of metabolic derangements to disease pathogenesis (e.g., diabetes, obesity, CVD) will be discussed along with potential therapeutics. Critically read primary research papers, and gain familiarity with seminal papers in the field and state-of-the-art research techniques in nutrition, exercise, physiology and metabolism.

KIN 573X. Impact of Physical Activity on Healthy Aging. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: KIN 355, KIN 358, KIN 366, KIN 372 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Issues of aging from multiple kinesiological perspectives, such as the role of physical activity on brain health, on muscle health, on bone health, and on emotional health. Presentation of research article by students, and discussion; or research articles. Guest professors will present within their area of expertise and lead the discussions. Each student will complete a major writing assignment and verbal presentation in which a review of literature on a related topic will be presented.

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LAS 345X. Innovation and Entrepreneurship I. (1-0) Cr. 1. F. Prereq: Permission of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Introduction to the entrepreneurial mindset and key concepts related to innovation and entrepreneurship. Application of principles through case studies, group work and direct mentoring. Opportunities for experiential learning with LAS mentors, entrepreneurs, and alumni.

LAS 346X. Innovation and Entrepreneurship II. (1-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Permission of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. E xploration of key concepts related to innovation and entrepreneurship. Application of principles through case studies, group work and direct mentoring. Opportunities for experiential learning with LAS mentors, entrepreneurs, and alumni.

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M E 273X. Science and Practice of Brewing. (Cross-listed with FS HN 273X). (1.5-4.5) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: CHEM 167 or CHEM 177 and PHYS 221 or PHYS 231 or BIOL 211 or BIOL 212; or permission by the instructor; 21 years of age for all students. Introduction to brewing science and technology. Understanding the role of malts, hops, water, and yeast in production of ale and lager beers. Unit operations in brewing. Health, safety, and environmental sustainability in alcohol production and consumption. Weekly laboratory in practical aspects of beer production.

M E 280X. Design and Analysis of Cyber-Physical Systems. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: ENGR 160 or equivalent; PHYS 221. Introduction to the basic concepts of cyber-physical systems (CPS); physical and cyber considerations and constraints for design, analysis, performance monitoring and control of human-engineered physical systems; basic concepts of sensing, information processing and feedback actuation. Substantial hands-on computer programming activity relevant to CPS applications.

M E 426X. Mechanical Vibration . (Dual-listed with 526X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MATH 266 or 267; E M 324; M E 345. Elementary vibration analysis; single and multiple degree of freedom systems, energy methods; response to common transient, harmonic and random excitation sources; numerical methods of solution; eigenvalues and modal analysis; introduction to testing methods, data sampling and signal processing; vibration isolation, absorption and coupling minimization.

M E 491X. Laboratory Component. Cr. 1-3. This course is designed specifically for transfer and study abroad students who need to make up a lab to fulfill course requirements.

M E 526X. Mechanical Vibration . (Dual-listed with 426X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MATH 266 or 267; E M 324; M E 345. Elementary vibration analysis; single and multiple degree of freedom systems, energy methods; response to common transient, harmonic and random excitation sources; numerical methods of solution; eigenvalues and modal analysis; introduction to testing methods, data sampling and signal processing; vibration isolation, absorption and coupling minimization.

M E 693X. Entrepreneurship for Graduate Students in Science and Engineering. (Cross-listed with AGRON 693X, BCB 693X, E E 693X, ENGR 693X, and GENET 693X). (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.  Prereq: Graduate student status and completion of at least one semester of graduate coursework. Understanding key topics of starting a technology based company, from development of technology-led idea to early-stage entrepreneurial business. Concepts discussed include: entrepreneurship basics, starting a business, funding your business, protecting your technology/business IP.Subject matter experts and successful, technology-based entrepreneurs will provide real world examples from their experience with entrepreneurship. Learn about the world class entrepreneurship ecosystem at ISU and Central Iowa. Satisfactory-fail only.

M S E 580X. Introduction of Project Management for Thesis Research. (Cross-listed with CH E 580X and I E 580X). (1-0) Cr. 1. F.S. Tools and skills of Project Management (PM) adapted from industry to improve efficiency in thesis research. Project charter initiation for thesis, timeline and meeting scheduling tools, expectation management, and communication with advisors. Practice of the PM skills using student’s own thesis. Presentation of a project charter. Demonstration of knowledge of related PM skills and the ability of utilizing these skills for thesis research. Sharing thesis ideas and learning experience in the Graduate for Advancing Professional Skills (GAPS) learning community. Satisfactory-fail grading only.

MATH 139X. College Algebra Supplement. (1-0) Cr. 1. Prereq: Satisfactory performance on placement assessment, 2 years of high school algebra, 1 year of high school geometry. Corequisite with MATH 140. Math concepts to provide supplemental assistance with course topics of MATH 140. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

MATH 149X. Discrete Mathematics for Business and Social Sciences Supplement. (1-0) Cr 1. Prereq: Satisfactory performance on placement assessment, 2 years of high school algebra, 1 year of high school geometry. Corequisite MATH 150. Math concepts to provide supplemental assistance with course topics of MATH 150. Satisfactory-fail only.

MATH 403X. Intermediate Abstract Algebra. (Dual-listed with MATH 503X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: C or better in MATH 301 or permission of department. Not open to students with credit in MATH 504 or MATH 505. Properties of groups and rings, subgroups, ideals, and quotients, homomorphisms, structure theory for finite groups. PIDs, UFDs, and Euclidean Domains. Field extensions and finite fields. Selected applications.

MATH 408X. Mathematical Methods in Data Science. (3-0). Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Math 265 or permission of the instructor. Mathematical concepts in the Data Science Process, from preprocessing, modeling, and evaluation. Topics include: sets, variables, and basics of logic; functions, graphs, and equations; calculus and optimization; basics of mathematical statistics; graphs, and discrete structures; matrix, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and applications; machine learning algorithms; and other advanced topics. Emphasis on the effective use of Python or R and applications with real data sets.

MATH 423X. Mathematical Modeling in Biology . (Dual-listed with MATH 523X and cross-listed with BCBIO 423X and BCB 523X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MATH 266 or equivalent; MATH 265 or equivalent recommended. Introduction to mathematical techniques for modeling and simulation, parameter identification, and analysis of biological systems. Applications drawn from many branches of biology and medicine. Apply differential equations, difference equations, and dynamical systems theory to a wide array of biological problems.

MATH 469X. Introduction to Discrete Mathematics . (Dual-listed with MATH 569X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: MATH 317 or MATH 207; and MATH 304 or MATH 314 . Combinatorial counting, double-counting, generating functions, graph structure, planar graphs, probabilistic proofs, points in general positions, polytopes, Farkas lemma, linear programming and duality.

MATH 503X. Intermediate Abstract Algebra. (Dual-listed with MATH 403X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: C or better in MATH 301 or permission of department. Not open to students with credit in MATH 504 or MATH 505. Properties of groups and rings, subgroups, ideals, and quotients, homomorphisms, structure theory for finite groups. PIDs, UFDs, and Euclidean Domains. Field extensions and finite fields. Selected applications.

MATH 518X. Mathematical Modeling and Differential Equations. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereqs: Math 414, MATH 415. Basic theory of ordinary differential equations, existence and uniqueness theorems, linear systems, linearization and stability, mathematical models in biology and physics, modeling with ordinary and partial differential equations, dynamical systems techniques.

MATH 523X. Mathematical Modeling in Biology . (Dual-listed with MATH 423X and cross-listed with BCBIO 423X and BCB 523X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MATH 266 or equivalent; MATH 265 or equivalent recommended. Introduction to mathematical techniques for modeling and simulation, parameter identification, and analysis of biological systems. Applications drawn from many branches of biology and medicine. Apply differential equations, difference equations, and dynamical systems theory to a wide array of biological problems.

MATH 569X. Introduction to Discrete Mathematics . (Dual-listed with MATH 469X). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: MATH 317 or MATH 207; and MATH 304 or MATH 314 . Combinatorial counting, double-counting, generating functions, graph structure, planar graphs, probabilistic proofs, points in general positions, polytopes, Farkas lemma, linear programming and duality.

MATH 603X. Mathematical Logic II. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: MATH 601. Topics in model theory, computability theory, and set theory such as infinitary logic, non-standard models of arithmetic, ultraproducts, and independence results.

MATH 619X. Commutative Algebra. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: MATH 505. Detailed study of commutative rings with applications to number theory and algebraic geometry, including prime ideals, Going Up and Going Down theorems, exact sequences, modules of fractions, primary decomposition, rings of integers, dimension theory.

MATH 620X. Lie Algebras and Their Representations. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: MATH 504; and MATH 507 or MATH 510. Nilpotent and solvable Lie algebras. Root systems and the classification of finite-dimensional complex semi-simple Lie algebras. The universal enveloping algebra. Representation theory including Weyl's theorem, Verma modules, highest weight theory.

MATH 623X. High-Dimensional Probability and Linear Algebra for Machine Learning. (Cross-listed with E E 623X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MATH 510 or MATH 507; E E 523 or STAT 542. Key topics from non-asymptotic random matrix theory: Bounds on minimum and maximum singular values of many classes of high-dimensional random matrices, and on sums of a large number of random matrices. Chaining. Other linear algebra and probability concepts commonly used in Theoretical Machine Learning research. Discussion of recent papers in this area.

MGMT 381X. Managing Family Businesses. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Sophomore classification. Introduction to the important role family businesses play in the domestic and global economies and to the complex challenges and opportunities family businesses and the family members and other people involved encounter. Explore and identify best practices for successfully managing family businesses.

MGMT 470X. Leadership and Change Management. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereqs: MGMT 370 or MGMT 371. Practical application of leadership skills required in today's evolving business environment, including the need to effectively manage change. Understand how leaders are able to inspire and lead their peers, direct reports, as well as themselves. Explore methods and activities that support leaders in creating a culture that supports and inspires change within an organization. Examine the most current thinking in the area of leadership and change management and how that thinking translates into implementing successful practices within an organization.

MGMT 474X.  Employee Compensation and Benefits. (3-0) Cr. 3 F.S. Prereq: MGMT 471. Basic strategies, structures, and decisions involving employee compensation and benefit programs, including how these can be used to optimize financial, relational, and societal returns. Prepare management and human resource professionals on this important topic and also to give other future employees a comprehensive look at this key part of the employer/employee exchange dynamic. Provide understanding for individuals to competently manage and negotiate their own compensation lifecycle - from hire, to promotion, job change, and retirement.

MGMT 475X. Employment Law for Human Resources. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereqs: ACCT 215; MGMT 471. Fundamentals of U.S. employment law necessary for human resource management. Topics include sources of employment law, classification of workers, lawful hiring practices, liability arising from harassment and discrimination, worker’s rights and duties, employment contract issues, and lawful termination of an employee.

MGMT 476X. Talent Management. (Dual-listed with MGMT 576X). (3-0) Cr. 3. SS. T alent management, similar to human resources and/or human capital management, with a more strategic and integrated flavor. Emphasis on what practicing managers need to know about managing talent. Topics include the importance of strategic and evidence-based approaches to managing and making decisions about human capital (talent); recruiting and retaining talent; selecting talent, including evaluating specific selection methods with regard to their reliability, validity for predicting both performance and potential, fairness et cetera; legal and diversity issues in managing talent; managing talent in groups and teams; evaluating or assessing talent (both performance and potential); managing the performance of, and providing feedback to, talent; developing talent and identifying and developing potential; and managing talent derailment risk. Scientific, systematic, and evidence-based perspective with appreciation for the practical demands.

MGMT 481X. Nonprofit Management . (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Junior classification or above. Executives in nonprofits are recognizing the need to incorporate contemporary management skills into their organization and connect their organizations to related business. Executives in for-profit businesses interact with the nonprofit sector in business operations or in service as a board member for a nonprofit organization. Management practices that can be applied across lines in both nonprofit organization and for-profit businesses. Focus on the strategy, governance, management and leadership of nonprofit organizations and explore how this sector fits into the business landscape.

MGMT 520X. Corporate Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Technology Management. (Cross-listed with ENTSP 520X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: Graduate classification. Management of venture creation and innovation at large and established organizations. New ideas, concepts, and techniques on how to stimulate and exploit innovative activities to make established firms not only more responsive and flexible, but also more proactive and opportunity-creating. Related approaches combine activities targeted at the individual, team, organization, industry, regional, national and global level. Introduction to how today's large and established corporations (1) identify, develop and exploit innovative opportunities, (2) manage product development processes, and (3) create, spin-in, spin-off and manage new innovative ventures. This case-based course introduces emerging, non-traditional, evidence-based approaches, such as agile product development, design-thinking, entrepreneurial leadership, entrepreneurial ecosystems, open innovation and blue-ocean strategies.

MGMT 523X. Leadership. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Enrollment in the MBA program or permission of instructor. Applied overview of organizational leadership and teamwork, with special emphasis on the ability to successfully influence in a variety of contexts. Areas of emphasis include: research to better understand the influence process; leadership, followership, and management as a process; change and how to better lead and manage change in organizations.

MGMT 560X. Leadership Development . (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Applies overview of organizational leadership leveraging a 360 leadership evaluation, with special emphasis on the ability to be successful in a variety of contexts. The 360 leadership evaluation will form the foundation to create a leadership action plan. This will great assist in increasing one’s leadership effectiveness as the students' strengths and weaknesses discovered.

MGMT 576X. Talent Management. (Dual-listed with MGMT 476X). (3-0) Cr. 3. SS. T alent management, similar to human resources and/or human capital management, with a more strategic and integrated flavor. Emphasis on what practicing managers need to know about managing talent. Topics include the importance of strategic and evidence-based approaches to managing and making decisions about human capital (talent); recruiting and retaining talent; selecting talent, including evaluating specific selection methods with regard to their reliability, validity for predicting both performance and potential, fairness et cetera; legal and diversity issues in managing talent; managing talent in groups and teams; evaluating or assessing talent (both performance and potential); managing the performance of, and providing feedback to, talent; developing talent and identifying and developing potential; and managing talent derailment risk. Scientific, systematic, and evidence-based perspective with appreciation for the practical demands.

MGMT 612X. Seminar in Micro Management Topics. (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F. Foundation in micro research including domains of organizational behavior(OB) and human resource management (HR). Discuss classic micro topics (e.g., job performance), as well as topics that exemplify recent advances within the OB/HR literatures (e.g., big data). Multiple levels of analysis and consider how micro topics complement other areas of management research (i.e., entrepreneurship and macro topics). Theory and empirical research within the applied context of the OB/HR environment. Emphasize a systematic and scientific approach to deepeningcollectiveknowledge and understanding of topics.

MGMT 620AX. Special Topics: Resources and Capabilities . (3-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Graduate student enrolled in a PhD program. Provide students with a deeper content knowledge of foundational and contemporary research on organizational resources and capabilities. Concepts (e.g., resources, capabilities, sustainable competitive advantage, knowledge, etc.), theoretical frameworks (e.g., Resource-based Theory; Dynamic Capabilities; Resource-dependency Theory; Knowledge-based view), and relevant findings in this area of research. Multiple levels of analysis and consideration of how these topics emerge across different areas of management (micro and macro) and entrepreneurship research. Theory and empirical research embedded within the applied context of the management field. Emphasis on a systematic and scientific approach to deepening our knowledge and understanding of topics.

MGMT 620BX. Special Topics: Leadership. (3-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Graduate student enrolled in a PhD program. Provide a deeper content knowledge of leadership. Review major behavioral styles of leadership, as well as leader-follower relationships and a variety of other current leadership issues. Multiple levels of analysis and consideration of how these topics emerge across different areas of management (micro and macro) and entrepreneurship research. Theory and empirical research embedded within the applied context of the management field. Emphasis on a systematic and scientific approach to deepening knowledge and understanding of topics.

MGMT 620CX. Special Topics: Groups and Teams. (3-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Graduate student enrolled in a PhD program. Provide content knowledge of research in teams within the field of management, broadly defined. Covers research on teams from the perspective of the input-mediator-output-input model, which considers teams as complex, dynamic, and adaptive systems. Discussion of questions concerning composition and structure, processes and emergent states, and multilevel as well as temporal dynamics. Consideration of teams in students’ specific area of study (e.g., entrepreneurial teams, top management teams). Blend of theory and empirical research within the applied context of the management field. Emphasis on a systematic and scientific approach to deepening knowledge and understanding of topics.

MGMT 620DX. Special Topics: Crafting Research Ideas. (Cross-listed with ENTSP 620DX). (3-0) Cr. 1. S.Prereq: Graduate student enrolled in a PhD program. Role as a scholar is more than publishing research. The purpose of scholarship is to add to usable knowledge – which means knowledge that can be used to solve real-world problems. To publish an article, students need to convince other scholars of the quality of their research. To create usable knowledge, you need to solve a problem that managers face and communicate that solution to managers. Most managers do not read academic journals, so the publication of an article does not guarantee that anyone who needs the knowledge will find it. Introduction an ideal form of scholarship that Andy Van de Ven calls “engaged scholarship.” This form of scholarship requires the rigorous theory and methods but adds the additional component of connecting research to practitioners throughout the research process.

MGMT 620EX. Special Topics: Effective Academic Writing. (Cross-listed with ENTSP 620EX). (3-0) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Graduate student enrolled in a PhD program. Provide skills and training necessary to navigate the professional landscape of the management and entrepreneurship fields. Discussion of effective academic writing, focusing on the discipline of management (but certainly applicable beyond this field). Blend of theory, research, and practice focused on understanding one's role as a scholar, the implications of scholarly work, and successful advancement through career stages.

MGMT 620FX.  Special Topics: Professional Development in Management and Entrepreneurship Research.  (Cross-listed with ENTSP 620FX). (3-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F. Prereq: Graduate student enrolled in a PhD program at ISU.  Provides skills and training necessary to navigate the professional landscape of the management/entrepreneurship fields. Includes topics such as research collaborations and networking, the peer review process, ethics, scholarly writing, presenting scholarly work, developing a research identity, understanding the research process, receiving and utilizing feedback, and navigating career milestones. Blend of theory, research, and practice focused on understanding one's role as a scholar, the implications of scholarly work, and successful advancement through career stages.

MGMT 620GX. Special Topics: Bayesian Analysis in Management and Entrepreneurship Research. (Cross-listed with ENTSP 620GX). (3-0) Cr. 1. Provides a deeper understanding of research methodology. Introduces the fundamental concepts of Bayesian statistics as an advanced methodology to empirically investigate entrepreneurship and management phenomena. Analytical topics include Bayes theorem, prior specification, likelihood functions, Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations, analysis diagnostics, and posterior distributions. Application topics include Bayesian point estimates, intervals, predictions and hypothesis tests. Contrasts Bayesian approaches with frequentist paradigms such as statistical null-hypothesis significance tests. Designed to complement knowledge of MGMT 609 Organizational Research Methods. Focus on exercises and discussions regarding how to collect, analyze and interpret empirical data to develop and advance micro and macro-level theories in management and entrepreneurship.

MGMT 620HX. Applied Social Network Perspective. (Cross-listed with ENTSP 620HX). (3-0) Cr. 1. Prereq: Graduate student enrolled in a PhD program. Provide a deeper content knowledge of social networks in organizational contexts. Cover conceptual foundations of the social network perspective, including how it fundamentally differs from other research perspectives. Explore important implications of various social network attributes and processes in the context of contemporary organizational scholarship. Discuss research design and empirical considerations associated with this perspective. Consider course topics from multiple levels of analysis and consider how these topics emerge across different areas (i.e., micro and macro) of management and entrepreneurship research. Blend of theory and empirical research within the applied context of the management field. Emphasis on a systematic and scientific approach to deepening knowledge and understanding of topics.

MGMT 620IX. Mergers and Acquisitions. (Cross-listed with ENTSP 620IX). (3-0) Cr. 1. Prereq: Graduate student enrolled in a PhD program. Provide a deeper content knowledge of mergers and acquisitions (M&As). Cover various M&A topics (premiums, deal completion, CEO characteristics, post-merger integration, acquisition performance etc.), theoretical frameworks, as well as relevant findings of M&A research. Consider course topics from multiple levels of analysis and consider how these topics emerge across different areas of management (micro and macro) and entrepreneurship research. Blend of theory and empirical research within the applied context of the management field. Emphasis on a systematic and scientific approach to deepening knowledge and understanding of topics.

MGMT 620JX. Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Big Data in Management and Entrepreneurship Research. (Cross-listed with ENTSP 620JX). (3-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. Prereq: Graduate student enrolled in a PhD program. Provide a deeper understanding of research methodology implications of artificial intelligence, machine learning and big data for management and entrepreneurship scholars. Introduce students to the fundamental concepts and emerging capabilities of artificial intelligence and machine learning and investigate their applications in the context of data collection, data analysis and communication of research findings. Explore broader implications of these technologies for the objects of management research: organizations and their members. Designed to complement knowledge students can gain in MGMT 609 Organizational Research Methods and ENTSP/MGMT 620GX Bayesian Analysis in Management and Entrepreneurship Research.

MICRO 265X.  Predicting the Next Epidemic: Living in a One Health World . (2-0) Cr. 2. F.S. Prereq: High School Biology or Environmental Science . 8 week course. “One Health” concept as a relatively new approach to disease control, sustainability, and the consequences of environmental disruption. Interconnectedness of human, animal, and environmental health. Importance of scientists communicating with the general public about One Health topics, such as habitat loss, agricultural practices, and the spread of antibiotic resistant organisms.

MICRO 419X. Foodborne Hazards. (Cross-listed with FS HN 419X and TOX 419X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MICRO 201 or MICRO 302, a course in biochemistry. Pathogenesis of human microbiological foodborne infections and intoxications, principles of toxicology, major classes of toxicants in the food supply, governmental regulation of foodborne hazards.

MIS 410X. Blockchain and Cryptocurrency. (Dual-listed with MIS 510X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MIS 207 or COM S 227. The design and application aspects of blockchain technologies, cryptocurrencies, and the key value these technologies bring - distributed consensus and trust disintermediation. Study of how blockchain technology works with consideration to its potential disruptive impact on business and society. Key concepts include mining, hashing, proof-of-work, proof-of-stake, public key cryptography, smart contracts, and the double-spend problem.

MIS 441X. Cybersecurity Analytics. (3-0). Cr. 3. S. Prereq: MIS 435, MIS 436. Introduction to information security concepts, specifically how adversaries exploit systems and data for their benefit and how organizations can use analytics to detect and respond to security incidents. Survey of existing and emerging machine learning and artificial intelligence security tools for detecting and responding to security incidents.

MIS 510X. Blockchain and Cryptocurrency. (Dual-listed with MIS 410X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MIS 207 or COM S 227. The design and application aspects of blockchain technologies, cryptocurrencies, and the key value these technologies bring - distributed consensus and trust disintermediation. Study of how blockchain technology works with consideration to its potential disruptive impact on business and society. Key concepts include mining, hashing, proof-of-work, proof-of-stake, public key cryptography, smart contracts, and the double-spend problem.

MKT 452X. Sales Analytics. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: MKT 342. An applied study of the concepts, practice, and technical skills required to perform meaningful analytics in support of professional selling. Topics include: nature and aims of sales analytics; customer relationship management platform basics; sales data structure; data visualization; dashboard construction; predictive analytics; artificial intelligence.

MKT 454X. Entrepreneurial Marketing. (Cross-listed with ENTSP 454X). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MKT 340. Basic understanding of marketing for those interested in creating or working for a start-up or an innovation-oriented company or consultancy. Relevant to marketing roles in entrepreneurial firms across both B2B and B2C markets. Integrates theory and practice, and provides insight into how entrepreneurs take both strategic and tactical marketing decisions in uncertain business environments. For hands-on perspective, incorporates projects involving real-world marketing problems confronting start-ups, and guest talks from entrepreneurs and frequent case analyses.

MKT 455X. Managing for Creativity and Innovation. (Dual-listed with MKT 555X). (3-0). Cr. 3. Prereq: MKT 340 or MKT 501. Understanding the managerial space between how people enhance their individual creativity and the deployment of human and technology resources at group and department levels. Each class session focuses on a different managerial practice (e.g., hiring, assembling teams, job assignments) and how to enhance organizational creativity through them. Psychological and social factors applicable to those practices and that impinge on creativity will be discussed, and business cases related to the practices will be used to close the gap between theory and practice.

MKT 456X. Digital Marketing Analytics. (3-0). Cr. 3. Prereq: MKT 340. Digital marketing provides marketers with a lot of consumer data. This course explores topics such as organic and paid search, social media, and email marketing to understand how they contribute to a cohesive online presence. Identification of key performance indicators to determine the performance of the digital marketing activity in each channel, as well as how to leverage these insights to formulate future strategies are key objectives.

MKT 484. Technology, Globalization and Culture. (Cross-listed with WLC 484/M E 484) (Dual listed with MKT 584).(3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Junior or senior classification. Cross-disciplinary examination of the present and future impact of globalization with a focus on preparing students for leadership roles in diverse professional, social, and cultural contexts. Facilitate an understanding of the threats and opportunities inherent in the globalization process as they are perceived by practicing professionals and articulated in debates on globalization. Use of a digital forum for presenting and analyzing globalization issues by on-campus and off-campus specialists.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

MKT 548X. Customer Relationship Management Strategy and Analytics. (3-0) Cr. 3. Irr. SS. Prereq: MKT 501.  Companies are shifting their focus from products to customers in response to increased globalization and intensity of competition in most markets. New technologies and tools that capture customer data in real time are now available because of the Internet revolution. These two trends in combination have opened up a new way of addressing customers and capturing value from customers--termed "Customer Relationship Management". Focus on the adoption of CRM practices and key strategies that contribute to improved customer and firm performance. Key topics covered include CRM definition and strategy, customer satisfaction and loyalty models, social media and customer engagement, retention and churn models, campaign management and customer value metrics and drivers. Use of customer databases and analytical modeling of important CRM outcomes.

MKT 555X. Managing for Creativity and Innovation. (Dual-listed with MKT 455X). (3-0). Cr. 3. Prereq: MKT 340 or MKT 501. Understanding the managerial space between how people enhance their individual creativity and the deployment of human and technology resources at group and department levels. Each class session focuses on a different managerial practice (e.g., hiring, assembling teams, job assignments) and how to enhance organizational creativity through them. Psychological and social factors applicable to those practices and that impinge on creativity will be discussed, and business cases related to the practices will be used to close the gap between theory and practice.

MKT 584. Technology, Globalization and Culture. (Cross-listed with WLC 484/M E 484) (Dual listed with MKT 484). Cr. 3. F. Cross-disciplinary examination of the present and future impact of globalization with a focus on preparing students for leadership roles in diverse professional, social, and cultural contexts. Facilitate an understanding of the threats and opportunities inherent in the globalization process as they are perceived by practicing professionals and articulated in debates on globalization. Use of a digital forum for presenting and analyzing globalization issues by on-campus and off-campus specialists.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

MTEOR 399X. Writing for Research. (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereq: ENGL 250; SP CM 212; MTEOR 311; Junior standing; Majors only. Principles of effective scientific writing and communication. Concepts covered are intended to be applied in MTEOR 499: Senior Research.

MTEOR 408X. Numerical Weather and Climate Prediction. (Dual-listed with MTEOR 508X). (3-0). Cr. 3. Prereq: MTEOR 227 or equivalent and MTEOR 443. Numerical solutions of the differential equations that describe weather and climate. Survey of numerical solution techniques with focus on advantages and limitations of different methods. Physical parameterizations for turbulence, clouds, and land surface processes. Forecast verification. Applications including designing and running simulations on high-performance computing systems.

MTEOR 433X. Meteorological Measurements Laboratory. (1-2) Cr. 2. S. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in MATH 266, PHYS 232. Principles of meteorological sensing and data analysis. Topics include thermometry, barometry, hygrometry, anemometry, precipitation measurements, radiometry, radar, remote sensing, visibility, and cloud height. Calibration and measurement uncertainties. Field trip to the National Weather Service. Emphasis on dataloggers and modern weather stations.

MTEOR 460X. Atmospheric Chemistry. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: CHEM 167 or CHEM 167 or CHEM 178 or CHEM 201. Fundamental concepts in atmospheric chemistry. Topics include: atmospheric gaseous and aerosol constituents, sources, and chemical reactions; impact of atmospheric gases and aerosols on global climate, climate change, air quality, and public health; transport of atmospheric constituents; and tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry.

MTEOR 508X. Numerical Weather and Climate Prediction. (Dual-listed with MTEOR 408X). (3-0). Cr. 3. Prereq: MTEOR 227 or equivalent and MTEOR 443. Numerical solutions of the differential equations that describe weather and climate. Survey of numerical solution techniques with focus on advantages and limitations of different methods. Physical parameterizations for turbulence, clouds, and land surface processes. Forecast verification. Applications including designing and running simulations on high-performance computing systems.

MUSIC 474X. Music and Neuroscience. (Cross-listed with KIN 474X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: KIN 372 or permission by instructor. Understanding how music is processed in the brain and the implications for healthy care and education. Online discussions about how music changes all aspects of the brain from neurotransmitters to cortical reorganization.

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NEURO 589X. Systems Neuroscience: Brain, Behavior, and Nutrition-Related Integrative Physiology. (Cross-listed with FS HN 589X, GERON 589X, NUTRS 589X, PSYCH 589X). (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereqs: Graduate standing, or undergraduate with consent of instructor. Structural, functional, and biochemical aspects of brain and non-motor behavior across the human lifespan. Types of neuroimaging used to assess the brain. Current research is leveraged to gauge how nutrition, diseases related to nutrition, and associated physiological processes influence the brain, particularly for common developmental, psychological, and neurological disorders.

NREM 483X. Science + Design: Interpretation of Natural Resources in Montana. (Cross-listed with ARTGR 483X). (1-4) Cr.3. F. Prereq: ARTGR 271 or BIOL 211 or graduate classification, and permission of instructor. Interdisciplinary service-learning. Design and production of natural resource related interpretive signs for Montana natural areas. Field-work experience followed by on-campus studio.

NREM 583X. Science + Design: Interpretation of Natural Resources in Montana. (Cross-listed with ARTGR 583X). (1-4) Cr.3. F. Prereq: ARTGR 271 or BIOL 211 or graduate classification, and permission of instructor. Interdisciplinary service-learning. Design and production of natural resource related interpretive signs for Montana natural areas. Field-work experience followed by on-campus studio.

NUTRS 553X. Molecular Physiology and Metabolism. (Cross-listed with KIN 553X). (2-0) Cr. 1. Prereq: Biochemistry, physiology, or permission of instructor . Focuses on the biochemical, cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate whole body, cell and tissue-specific fuel metabolism. An integration of mechanisms regulating metabolic signaling responses to alterations in nutritional status (e.g., starvation, obesity) or stressors such as exercise, nutrient stress, aging and disease. The contribution of metabolic derangements to disease pathogenesis (e.g., diabetes, obesity, CVD) will be discussed along with potential therapeutics. Critically read primary research papers, and gain familiarity with seminal papers in the field and state-of-the-art research techniques in nutrition, exercise, physiology and metabolism.

NUTRS 589X. Systems Neuroscience: Brain, Behavior, and Nutrition-Related Integrative Physiology. (Cross-listed with FS HN 589X, GERON 589X, NEURO 589X, PSYCH 589X). (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereqs: Graduate standing, or undergraduate with consent of instructor. Structural, functional, and biochemical aspects of brain and non-motor behavior across the human lifespan. Types of neuroimaging used to assess the brain. Current research is leveraged to gauge how nutrition, diseases related to nutrition, and associated physiological processes influence the brain, particularly for common developmental, psychological, and neurological disorders.

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